20 Most Recent Samsung LN-S2641D 26 in. LCD HDTV Questions & Answers


Samsung

Samsung... | Answered on Jul 16, 2013


I'm afraid that while their intention was good, that most the posted solutions miss the mark. Let me guide you thru the diagnosis and possible cure. This is detailed and lengthy, since these points appear often in LCD TV/Monitor repair. You may wish to warm up your soldering iron and skip to Step (11) for the repair procedure.

(1) We know that much of the Main Power Supply is working since many of the audio, video and digital processing sections appear to be working (sound, remote control, tuner, and video out).

(2) We know that the Backlight Inverter is working. Even thought the screen appears to be dark, light from the backlight tubes can clearly be observed. Further, even thought the screen is dark, you *can* observe a small amount of the backlight thru the screen.

(3) When working on LCD TVs and Monitors, the typical problem is backlight failure. (Fortunately this is NOT the case here.) Backlight failure is most often due to Backlight Inverter failure, or Main Power Supply failure. Rarely do the bulbs fail outright (although occasionally thru abuse a CCFL tube is cracked or shattered).

(4) The typical failure mechanism on LCD TV/Monitors that have many in-service hours on them is CCFL tube aging. As the CCFL tubes get older they require increasingly higher voltages to maintain the proper regulated current thru them which in turn creates the correct light output. The higher voltage is often beyond the design limit of the Backlight Inverter leading to component failure. Typically discharge breakdown arcing on the output transformers (that drive the CCFL lamps), or drive transistor failure in the Backlight Inverter power supply. Alternatively, the Main Power Supply may fail. Typically the Main Power Supply supplies +12V, or +15V, or a higher voltage (+24V?) to the Backlight Inverter subsystem. Once again, as the lamps age, more current is drawn, and if the Backlight Inverter doesn't fail outright, it draws excessive current from the Main Power Supply leading to either Main Power Supply failure. Alternatively, the Main Power Supply protects itself by shutting down once the excessive current is detected. This can often be seen as "monitor cycling" where by a LCD Monitor will initially power up, but subsequently cycles every few seconds as the Backlight Inverter draws too much current causing the Main Power Supply to shut down. Then, after a brief recovery period, the cycle repeats.

(5) Another failure mechanism, that should not be overlooked, is Electrolytic Capacitor failure. The Internet has many sites documenting either manufacturing defects in Electrolytic Capacitors used in any of the subsystems (Backlight Inverter, Main Power Supply, Digital Signal Processor, etc.). However, more often than not, Capacitor failure is due to component stress-due to the high ripple currents present in inadequately designed switching power supply subsystems. Additionally, many inferior Electrolytic Capacitors of Chinese origin are inadequately designed-they lack trace chemicals in the Electrolyte necessary to assure long service life.

(6) If you suspect any of the mechanisms described which cause an absence of CCFL backlight, you can often use a small pocket flashlight, and observe the screen image *is* in fact present on the LCD panel, but in the absence of sufficient backlight, you mistakenly believed the LCD panel to be dead.

(7) This is not the case here. We can clearly see that the CCFL backlight *is* lit, but we also do *not* observe any image on the LCD panel, even with an external flashlight.

(8) Thru this diagnosis of exclusion we assume that either the LCD panel itself is defective, or that the LCD panel is not receiving the correct drive signals from the Digital Signal Processor subsystem.

(9) A cursory examination reveals that the Digital Signal Processor board is producing output activity, which-even if malfunctioning-would likely produce some sort of LCD display activity.

(10) The LCD panel is totally dark (backlight is on, but no image at all). This failure is so absolute, it leads one to suspect power related problems as opposed to logic or drive problems.

Samsung... | Answered on Nov 12, 2012


If you have sound on the stations this is a problem in the display. Take bright flashlight and hold it against the screen. Look for an image around the edge of the flashlight. If you see an image then it's one of three problems;
1) The inverter board is bad.
2) The CCFT (cold cathode fluoresent light) are bad.
3) The power supply to the inverter board is bad.
Someone knowledgeable in electronics can replace the bad part(s).

Samsung... | Answered on Sep 27, 2012


hello,
Clicking problem on LCD tv's mostly from capacitors on power board. Read my tip here.
Good luck.

Samsung... | Answered on Apr 20, 2011


go thought this url http://www.samsung.com/in/support/howtoguide/supportHowToGuidePopup.do?howto_guide_seq=10&prd_ia_cd=02010100&map_seq=591&udt_dt=Oct%2012,%202007&page_gb=D&model_name=&type_ia_cd=02010000

Samsung... | Answered on Oct 13, 2010


Hi


Thanks for using FixYa. First of all please switch off the TV and pull off all the connections from/to the TV connected with any other source. Switch it on at least after 1 hour to drain off the current from all the components especially capacitors before you perform any test or repair. I believe the issue is with the Backlight Inverter Board as the sound is working fine. It could also be due to swollen/bulged capacitors on the power supply board which makes the unit to shut down. Also note that the TV consists of very high voltages even when it is in OFF condition. Please check that all the cable wires are fine and connected properly with the TV and cable box or any other device. Also please check that the inverter and back light are fine. If the issue is not resolved then this might have happened due to over-voltage. Please check the power supply unit for swollen/bulged capacitors and burnt wires/components of your TV.

Please do accept the solution if the issue is resolved or else revert for further assistance.


Thanks
Rylee

Samsung... | Answered on Jan 19, 2010


the input board will cause that

Samsung... | Answered on Sep 29, 2009


Go into settings menu on your screen setting and change the PAL/NTSC settings Aust uses a different format to the US. Try "Auto" first if you have that option.

Samsung... | Answered on Aug 30, 2009


this could be a loose LVDS cable, or the T-con board

Samsung... | Answered on Mar 20, 2009


Lay the TV face down on a flat surface covered with a cloth. Back out all the screws holding the base stand. Hold the back and front against the base shank while tightening all the screws through the base. Make sure they are tight.

Samsung... | Answered on Mar 14, 2009


This sound like you are having problems with the power supply board. Since you are getting a momentary picture and sound the fuses are good but TVs today have "shorts" and "overvoltage" circuitry build in that will shut it down on errors. Someone knowledgeable in electronics will have to isolate the exact cause.

Samsung... | Answered on Mar 10, 2009


Bring it back IMMEDIATELY!~

Samsung... | Answered on Dec 23, 2008


Broken screen , replace it with new TV as the repair will cost at least 75% as much.

Samsung... | Answered on Dec 23, 2008


you could a pinch in the wire going to button assy

Samsung... | Answered on Nov 27, 2008


First you might call LG support it could be a simple software upgrade It depends with have some initial measurments you could have one of two problems a Bad main board or a bad TFT controller board

Samsung... | Answered on Nov 19, 2008


forthe cost of the unit vs. the cost of having it serviced , ive decided to work on it myself. I have it narrowed down to the flourescent backlight or the backlight power curcuit.

Samsung... | Answered on Sep 17, 2008


If you lay the TV down on something soft but firm (towel on the floor or counter) put the screen face down on the back you should see 4 screw holes with the an (S) next to them. They are located at the center near the bottom. If you remove these screws the stand should then slide out of the bottom of the TV. Good Luck

Samsung... | Answered on Jul 13, 2008

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