20 Most Recent Nikon F100 35mm SLR Camera Questions & Answers


It depends where the dirt is. Following the light path, look at the rear surface of the lens. A dirty rear lens surface will have the most affect on picture quality or what you see in the viewfinder of any position in the light path. Like all optical cleaning procedures, hold the lens with the rear lens surface facing the ground so gravity will work with you. Start by blowing clean air on it using canned air or a blower such as a Rocket blower or ear syringe. If that is sufficient, do not continue the sequence. This holds true at the conclusion of each step because the more aggressive your cleaning becomes, the more risk there is of damage. If it is still dirty, gently brush it with a sable or camel hair brush. If that is not sufficient, gently wipe it with a dry lens photograph lens tissue (do not use coated tissues) or a microfiber cloth. Finally, as a last resort, dampen a corner of a lens tissue or microfiber cloth (do not put the wet solution directly on the lens) and gently wipe with a circular motion. Finish by wiping with a dry section of the tissue or cloth. Although the front surface of the lens is not as important, repeat the process for the front surface.
If you still see the dirt in the viewfinder, are two possible remaining locations; the bottom surface of the prism located above the mirror or the mirror.
Clean the prism first and avoid cleaning the mirror if possible, or any contact with the mirror. The prism can be cleaned following the sequence outlined above. If that doesn't work, the problem is the mirror.
CAUTION! The mirror is front surfaced and is very susceptible to scratches and other damage unlike a conventional mirror which is rear surfaced with the glass protecting the coating. Aggressive cleaning should be avoided.
Carefully follow step 1 of the lens cleaning procedure (air) and step 2 (brushing) if necessary. As far as the third and fourth steps, I would not use them myself because of the risk of mirror coating damage. It would be better to take your camera to a qualified repairman.


remove the lens and look above the mirror at the bottom of the viewfinder prism. If it is dirty, clean it as you would clean a lens surface. The next place to look is the mirror.
CAUTION! The mirror, unlike the mirror over your bathroom sink, is front surfaced and there is no glass between you and the delicate and easily damaged coating. Hold the camera with the mirror facing down so that gravity will work in your favor. If that does not work, I would stop and take it to a camera repairman because you do not want to risk scratching the surface by using lens tissue or cleaner.

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on Sep 05, 2014


Hi David,
Are you talking about the dial on the right side of the pentaprism? If so I believe that entire top can be removed then replaced with a new/used. Check with Nikon for the part number then have your fingers do the walking.

Cordially,

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on May 26, 2014


Here are two links the first is to the main page of Tom Hagan who is a service writer for Nikon cameras to me he's the Godfather of Nikon the man in the know who writes understandable user manuals.
http://www.bythom.com/index.htm
The second is from Tom's site as well I just found the specific camera you were asking about and am supplying you the link
http://www.bythom.com/f100guide.htm
I've had several of Tom Hogan's ebooks and let them go with the cameras when it was time to update. The books are better then the Magic Lantern Guides that are on the market as well.
Another place to purchase manual/guides is Amazon. Hope this was a help.
Happy Holidays from Robert in Canada

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on Feb 05, 2013


Take a look at
http://uscamera.com/1b991-327.htm
and
http://uscamera.com/1K467-197.htm

I think one of those is what you're looking for. If not, you can see what else they have for the F100 at
http://uscamera.com/f100_1.htm

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on Aug 25, 2011


I have the same problem with mine. Although I can't say for sure I think it only becomes aproblem if the camera sits a few days without use. I would love to know if nikon would put this right, it is pretty common complaint.

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on Jan 22, 2011


If like most film cameras this one has been sitting for a while unused the batteries are most likely dead AND there might be a considerable amount of corrosion in the battery compartment. All that corrosion needs to be removed before your F100 will work again.

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on Dec 29, 2010


The camera may be set to do a multiple exposure and you must take the camera off this setting back to normal mode to remedy this.
1. Look at the top of the camera from the back - on the far left is the knob with the BKT, FLASH, and ISO buttons. On the bottom of the outside of this knob there is a small ring and also a small black unlabeled button to the top left of the knob.
2. Press and hold the small button
3. Turn the ring until it shows the "S" setting

Then fire the shutter - the camera should operate as normal and advance the film after the shutter firing and also increment the frame counter. If it still does not, then your film advance motor may be bad and need to be replaced or repaired or your sensor in the back that detects the frames may be faulty.

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on Nov 26, 2010


Your battery casing contacts may be corroded. Check them for any signs of rust, corrosion, or battery acid. If there are, then gently scrape it off using a small knife or screwdriver other utensil.
Also, are you using re-chargeable batteries? If so, the meter may read low even if they are fresh. The F100 meter has to be reset when it is showing low power by getting enough voltage. So you can try putting in Alkaline or lithium batteries to reset the meter, and then use your rechargeables after it has reset (should be instantly after you turn it on).
The F100 is quite a battery hog and is picky about what is used in it. You may just need to try a different set of batteries to get it to stop showing the low battery.

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on Nov 26, 2010


The camera may be set to do a multiple exposure and you must take the camera off this setting back to normal mode to remedy this.
1. Look at the top of the camera from the back - on the far left is the knob with the BKT, FLASH, and ISO buttons. On the bottom of the outside of this knob there is a small ring and also a small black unlabeled button to the top left of the knob.
2. Press and hold the small button
3. Turn the ring until it shows the "S" setting

Then fire the shutter - the camera should operate as normal and advance the film after the shutter firing. If it still does not, then your film advance motor may be bad and need to be replaced or repaired.

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on Nov 26, 2010


http://uscamera.com/f100_1.htm

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on Sep 24, 2010


Check the selector in the front lower right of the camera. Move it to M then S, then C, then back to S. Next: you need to adjust the setting from self timer back to normal, press the mode button and check the icon select from self timer to normal shooting mode.

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on Sep 14, 2010


We will assume you know how to load the film to the red mark. If the film is not advancing a couple of things could be happening. When you close the back door it is not engaging the film to hold it against the take-up spool. If so then that needs to be fixed. The other thing to check is the left side where the film cartridge goes in, does it turn. If not it is binding the film cartridge. Nikon Film 1-800-645-6687

Nikon F100 35mm... | Answered on Sep 14, 2010

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