20 Most Recent Pioneer PRO-710HD 64" Rear Projection Television Questions & Answers


You MUST have the remote to perform service operations on the Elites. Look on ebay or do a google search for Pioneer 710 remote.
There is no way to manually do convergence without a remote, and no way to call up the convergence menu.

Pioneer... | Answered on Jan 08, 2015


It is most likely the power supply. Do not try to fix this yourself. There are LETHAL voltages inside such a TV, which can persist for WEEKS after it has been turned off.

Pioneer... | Answered on Aug 06, 2013


Send your email address to me by Fixya, and get back a copy of it by return mail. Send the email address by 'Fixya'; not by the comment to this reply.

Pioneer... | Answered on Jan 29, 2013


Nope there is not.

Pioneer... | Answered on Dec 22, 2012


I doubt it, we have in our shop about five of their remotes and each only works on one or two models--bite the bullet to get another or if you have the original but it does not work, most shops can fix that for a reasonable price.

Pioneer... | Answered on Dec 15, 2012


The most common problem this group of sets had was bad solder connections all over the power board that develop after some years of use----most of them I have repaired a total resolder of most or all connections on that board fixes the problem.

Pioneer... | Answered on Dec 07, 2012


If using a box of some sort unplug it first and then later plug it back (do same with set) .

This will allow both units to reboot and may or may not cure your issues.

The pop at turn off suggests either a audio problem or a power supply issue.

Due to the age of the set the only common issue here is these sets develop bad solder connections from age----mostly on the power supply board inside the set.

Pioneer... | Answered on May 17, 2012


This has been successfully answered, but here's some more information:
Your Pioneer 710HD has the classic cold solder joint problem endemic to all of this series of Elite CRT RPTV. The power supply - PS - board needs to be resoldered virtually completely. It's a time consuming, tedious job that if you get wrong, who knows what could happen when you turn it on again? So don't even think about resoldering it if you are an amateur at the soldering process.
I do this job every day then run it out in my test 610HD - same series - and then equip your board with a lifetime warranty on the resoldering work I have done. Please contact me directly, google Mr Bob and calibrations and Image Perfection.
Unless you do resoldering every day as a professional assembler or are an experienced repair tech, I cannot in good conscience advise you to do this yourself. Far too much is riding on it.
However, if you are highly experienced at soldering, resolder everything but the heat sinks, the test points, and whatever has already been resoldered and is still glossy and gleaming, like fresh resoldering is. The solder used in the original assembly of that board was far too thin, which results in these cold solder joints.
And don't do it part way! Many joints that are not bad now will be soon, trust me, and if you have only resoldered just the ones that are bad now - the early ones to go out - and continue to use it, you make your board that much more susceptible to the far more dangerous ones that happen later on, which can damage boards downline from the power supply board.
I am the only repair person I know of offering a lifetime warranty. Even Pioneer does not do that. In fact I have permanently corrected many rebuilt Pioneer boards when they've gone out later. Pix are available at www.avsforum.com.
In your case chances are you have not heeded the warning signs of cold solder joints: intermittent ops, blue flashes, fluctuations in the brightness of your pic and other instabilities.
In the case where one of these units turns on then turns off again - LED in front goes green, then immediately back to red before a picture has a chance to appear - it's "going into protection". Chances are something downline has now been damaged because of the instability of the PS board, which is responsible for powering up the entire unit.
What I would recommend if it's "gone too far" and the unit will not stay on anymore, is a troubleshooting session with me on the phone, which is something I require before allowing a PS board to be sent to me for resoldering if the set's not staying on. Luckily, these sets were designed with on board diagnostics that can be read by technicians from far away.
If it goes green then stays green but no pic appears - even graphics like the Menu - then one of the cold solder joints that powers up the section that powers up your picture has opened up and is now staying open. This has always been remedied 100% by the resoldering process.
If it powers up correctly upon turnon from dead cold, DON'T PUSH IT! If it still has intemittencies, it's in a very precarious, dangerous condition. Many sets have been run past their warning signs, and by the time I get notified and can lend a hand, they are considered totalled and are abandoned. Don't let that happen to you. RUN IT FOR NO MORE THAN 40 SECONDS, and power it down again and unplug it.
DO NOT ALLOW IT UP TO NORMAL OPERATING TEMP AGAIN - EVEN ONCE - UNTIL FIXED PROPERLY.
If it turns on from dead cold and works properly even tho intermittencies have happened in the past, this is the best case scenario. It means it can be resoldered properly and you'll be home free. Or sent to me for resoldering if you are not a highly experienced repair tech or assembler, in which case you'll get my lifetime warranty on the resoldering work..
Mr [email protected]

Pioneer... | Answered on Apr 26, 2012


You could get the old one and have them match it up. If not try www.pioneerservice.com

Pioneer... | Answered on Apr 26, 2012


Your Pioneer 710HD has the classic cold solder joint problem endemic
to all of this series of Elite CRT RPTV. The power supply - PS -
board needs to be resoldered virtually completely. It's a time
consuming, tedious job that if you get wrong, who knows what could
happen when you turn it on again? So don't even think about
resoldering it if you are an amateur at the soldering process.
I do this job every day then run it out in my test 610HD - same
series - and then equip your board with a lifetime warranty on the
resoldering work I have done. Please contact me directly, google Mr
Bob and calibrations and Image Perfection. Unless you do resoldering
every day as a professional assembler or are an experienced repair
tech, I cannot in good conscience advise you to do this yourself.
Far too much is riding on it.
However, if you are highly experienced at soldering, resolder
everything but the heat sinks, the test points, and whatever has
already been resoldered and is still glossy and gleaming, like fresh
resoldering is. The solder used in the original assembly of that
board was far too thin, which results in these cold solder joints.
And don't do it part way! Many joints that are not bad now will be
soon, trust me, and if you have only resoldered just the ones that
are bad now - the early ones to go out - and continue to use it, you
make your board that much more susceptible to the far more dangerous
ones that happen later on, which can damage boards downline from the
power supply board.
I am the only repair person I know of offering a lifetime warranty.
Even Pioneer does not do that. In fact I have permanently corrected
many rebuilt Pioneer boards when they've gone out later. Pix are
available at www.avsforum.com
In your case chances are you have not heeded the warning signs of
cold solder joints: intermittent ops, blue flashes, fluctuations in
the brightness of your pic and other instabilities.
In the case where one of these units turns on then turns off again -
LED in front goes green, then immediately back to red before a
picture has a chance to appear - it's "going into protection".
Chances are something downline has now been damaged because of the
instability of the PS board, which is responsible for powering up the
entire unit.
What I would recommend if it's "gone too far" and the unit will not
stay on anymore, is a troubleshooting session with me on the phone,
which is something I require before allowing a PS board to be sent to
me for resoldering if the set's not staying on. Luckily, these sets
were designed with on board diagnostics that can be read by
technicians from far away.
If it goes green then stays green but no pic appears - even graphics
like the Menu - then one of the cold solder joints that powers up the
section that powers up your picture has opened up and is now staying
open. This has always been remedied 100% by the resoldering process.
If it powers up correctly upon turnon from dead cold, DON'T PUSH IT!
If it still has intemittencies, it's in a very precarious, dangerous
condition. Many sets have been run past their warning signs, and by
the time I get notified and can lend a hand, they are considered
totalled and are abandoned. Don't let that happen to you. RUN IT
FOR NO MORE THAN 40 SECONDS, and power it down again and unplug it.
DO NOT ALLOW IT UP TO NORMAL OPERATING TEMP AGAIN - EVEN ONCE - UNTIL
FIXED PROPERLY.
If it turns on from dead cold and works properly even tho
intermittencies have happened in the past, this is the best case
scenario. It means it can be resoldered properly and you'll be home
free. Or sent to me for resoldering if you are not a highly
experienced repair tech or assembler, in which case you'll get my
lifetime warranty on the resoldering work.

Mr [email protected]

Pioneer... | Answered on Apr 26, 2012


If the pic on your CRT RPTV is bleary, its front viewscreen is not the problem, and no, your set is not worn out even tho it really looks that way.
The solution is that the internal optics need to be cleaned, due to the high voltage inherent in CRT use. Remember how your old, thick computer monitor would get incredibly dusty on its face? That's because of the HV ionizing all nearby particulates and charging them with static cling. They then drift to and deposit themselves directly upon the closest smooth surface - in the case of CRT computer monitors, the face of the monitor. In the case of CRT RPTVs, the mirror and lenses. In other words, at certain very critical points on your 28 surface optical chain that comprises the CRT RPTV's projection light path.
Optics cleaning should happen once a year without fail, otherwise you're really not getting your money's worth out of your multi-thousand dollar set. And CRT HD ready RPTVs are classics, with 20 year service lives.
On some units only 4 surfaces need to be cleaned, like Mit. On others, like Pioneer, 10 of the 28 surfaces need to be cleaned.
But be very careful, these lens surfaces are made of very soft, vulnerable plastic, and are very easily scratched or - even worse - scuffed, which is thousands to tiny scratches at once. The mirrors in HDready sets are front surface or mylar - you are not cleaning glass at any point, with these sets.
As such you need to be painfully careful, as damage is immediate and permanent. I recommend contacting me directly before doing any optics cleaning on any projection set, esp. CRT RPTVs.
But oh, what a difference a day makes! This can all be done in a day, after which your CRT RPTV will look like a new TV again!
Mr [email protected]
As such them 4_26_2012_8_26_17_pm.jpg4_26_2012_8_26_33_pm.jpg

Pioneer... | Answered on Apr 26, 2012


Your Pioneer 710HD has the classic cold solder joint problem endemic to all of this series of Elite CRT RPTV. The power supply - PS - board needs to be resoldered virtually completely. It's a time consuming, tedious job that if you get wrong, who knows what could happen when you turn it on again? So don't even think about resoldering it if you are an amateur at the soldering process.
I do this job every day then run it out in my test 610HD - same series - and then equip your board with a lifetime warranty on the resoldering work I have done. Please contact me directly, google Mr Bob and calibrations and Image Perfection. Unless you do resoldering every day as a professional assembler or are an experienced repair tech, I cannot in good conscience advise you to do this yourself. Far too much is riding on it.
However, if you are highly experienced at soldering, resolder everything but the heat sinks, the test points, and whatever has already been resoldered and is still glossy and gleaming, like fresh resoldering is. The solder used in the original assembly of that board was far too thin, which results in these cold solder joints.
And don't do it part way! Many joints that are not bad now will be soon, trust me, and if you have only resoldered just the ones that are bad now - the early ones to go out - and continue to use it, you make your board that much more susceptible to the far more dangerous ones that happen later on, which can damage boards downline from the power supply board.
I am the only repair person I know of offering a lifetime warranty. Even Pioneer does not do that. In fact I have permanently corrected many rebuilt Pioneer boards when they've gone out later. Pix are available at www.avsforum.com
In your case chances are you have not heeded the warning signs of cold solder joints: intermittent ops, blue flashes, fluctuations in the brightness of your pic and other instabilities.
In the case where one of these units turns on then turns off again - LED in front goes green, then immediately back to red before a picture has a chance to appear - it's "going into protection". Chances are something downline has now been damaged because of the instability of the PS board, which is responsible for powering up the entire unit.
What I would recommend if it's "gone too far" and the unit will not stay on anymore, is a troubleshooting session with me on the phone, which is something I require before allowing a PS board to be sent to me for resoldering if the set's not staying on. Luckily, these sets were designed with on board diagnostics that can be read by technicians from far away.

If it goes green then stays green but no pic appears - even graphics like the Menu - then one of the cold solder joints that powers up the section that powers up your picture has opened up and is now staying open. This has always been remedied 100% by the resoldering process.
If it powers up correctly upon turnon from dead cold, DON'T PUSH IT! If it still has intemittencies, it's in a very precarious, dangerous condition. Many sets have been run past their warning signs, and by the time I get notified and can lend a hand, they are considered totalled and are abandoned. Don't let that happen to you. RUN IT FOR NO MORE THAN 40 SECONDS, and power it down again and unplug it. DO NOT ALLOW IT UP TO NORMAL OPERATING TEMP AGAIN - EVEN ONCE - UNTIL FIXED PROPERLY.
If it turns on from dead cold and works properly even tho intermittencies have happened in the past, this is the best case scenario. It means it can be resoldered properly and you'll be home free. Or sent to me for resoldering if you are not a highly experienced repair tech or assembler, in which case you'll get my lifetime warranty on the resoldering work..

Mr [email protected]

Pioneer... | Answered on Apr 26, 2012


dying bulb and clogged with dust cooling fans.

Pioneer... | Answered on Apr 26, 2012


www.tvrepairworld.com should be able to assist with the convergence ICs and they do ship to other countries.

Pioneer... | Answered on May 20, 2011


hi,
Its shipping wieght is 368 lb, arround 166.92 kg
ok

Pioneer... | Answered on Apr 29, 2011


hello,
Yes you still have to get digital to analog converter. Although you can feed a hd signal through the component inputs, the tv is still set up to only receive analog signals through the coaxial input
hope this helps

Pioneer... | Answered on Jan 14, 2011


Bright flashes in a CRT tv means that you get high tension discharges in the video final board which in turn trigger a power surge that cause the tv to shut down.
You didn't said which colour is the flash so i 'm supposing that is white. This mean that the discharge is affecting all 3 tubes at the same time, which means that you must verify the high tension leads, the flyback transformer and all the groundings on the tubes. Also verify the static dischargers on the video board.

Pioneer... | Answered on Nov 20, 2010

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