20 Most Recent Aeris Snorkeling Bag Questions & Answers


Purge valves are fairly generic. If you can't easily locate a Aeris dealer, go into any SCUBA shop and ask if they have replacement
purge valves. They do come in several valve and nipple sizes, but you might get lucky. Any dive store worth it's salt will have spares of that sort as a customer service. Failing that, just call the company, talk to customer service and they will likely send you one for free.

Aeris Snorkeling... | Answered on Aug 20, 2010


Or more to the point: Snorkels don't work under water. They work on the surface by allowing the wearer to have his/her face in the water so that one can look at what is going on and the top of the snorkel is several inches above the surface allowing the user to breath through the tube. If, as often happens, the snorkel gets water in it, there is a trap at the bottom that catches it so you don't **** it into your lungs and on the next exhale you do so forcefully and this expels all the water from the tube and allows you to continue breathing.

Aeris Snorkeling... | Answered on Aug 09, 2009


"A snorkel must fit comfortably in your mouth, allow you to purge water out of the mouthpiece and hose quickly and help you to swim efficiently. But, the most important characteristics to remember when choosing a snorkel are its length and the diameter of its barrel. Snorkels must not be too long or too short. If a snorkel is too long it will be difficult to breathe because the barrel will fill up with carbon dioxide. Every time you breathe out carbon dioxide through your snorkel your breath must travel up and out of the barrel of your snorkel to allow you to draw oxygen back down the barrel and into your lungs. If your snorkel is too long you will only push a percentage of the carbon dioxide up and out of the barrel during your exhale. You will need to inhale oxygen before all the carbon dioxide has been pushed out; leaving the percentage of carbon dioxide entering your bloodstream higher each time you take a breath. This cycle could lead to suffocation. If a snorkel is too short it will constantly fill with water, requiring you to constantly force the water out of your snorkel which can be very exhausting. The inside diameter of your snorkel must be approximately three quarters of an inch or 1.9 cm. If the snorkel is thinner than .75 inches it will be difficult to breathe because there will not be enough room in the barrel for you to draw enough air into your lungs. This will cause you to breathe harder and rapidly, which could cause hyperventilation. If the barrel is thicker than .75 inches it will be too large and will be uncomfortable to use and attach to your mask. Learning to attach your snorkel to your scuba mask to make sure it is easy to grab and use is an important part of safe scuba diving practices. Snorkels are attached to the left side of your mask with a snorkel keeper. Snorkel keepers are either plastic or rubber and most use a post-hole closure. Each snorkel keeper is different and attaching your snorkel to your mask with a snorkel keeper requires practice. If you will detach your snorkel from your mask after each dive you should practice attaching your snorkel, as it can be a little tricky. Alternately, you can leave your snorkel attached to your mask if you are diving more than once in a day. "

Aeris Snorkeling... | Answered on Mar 30, 2009


No need to use soap or fancy cleaners for snorkel or dive gear. The important thing is just to get the salt off, and plain old fresh water will do the trick. The best way to clean your gear, is to fill a bucket or a tub with warm water, and then dunk your gear several times to rinse it out thoroughly. In some cases I like to swish it around underwater, and maybe rub the rubber parts to ensure a thorough rinsing. After that, let it drip dry and store it in a cool, dry, *dark* place. Salt and sunlight are the two things that'll kill your gear in no time at all, keep it safe from that and it should provide good use for a long time.

Aeris Snorkeling... | Answered on Dec 01, 2008


Step1 Make sure you are gripping the mouthpiece of the snorkel securely with your teeth. Step2 Exhale forcefully through your mouth. The majority of the water should be expelled from the tube. This method is commonly called "blasting" or "popping." Step3 Inhale gently at first in case there is any residual water. Blast a second time if needed. Step4 Continue blasting whenever water enters the snorkel.

Aeris Snorkeling... | Answered on Dec 01, 2008


Every scuba diver spends time on the surface while preparing to descend for a dive. A snorkel allows you to conserve energy by letting you keep your head in the water while swimming and enjoying the pre-dive sights without ever having to remove your head from the water.

Aeris Snorkeling... | Answered on Dec 01, 2008


Try to spray the commercial available mist to lower surface tension in order to avoid build-up of condensed water

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Nov 02, 2018


get that from <a> here </a>masskarafestivals.com/masks/

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Nov 11, 2017


Hey Candy,
I am sorry to tell you that NO ONE on fixya can help you,, we have NO WAY to find out any information of that type,, PLEASE contact the carrier AND the company that sent you the package... and your credit card company..(if that's how you paid for it!) ..and from now on - ALWAYS get something sent with SIGNATURE REQUIRED!!

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Sep 17, 2017


the law of buoyancy is the principle that describes why some objects float over water and some others sink: when you put something in water, it receives an upword force equal to the weight of the water it displaces.
this is important in diving in many ways.. and in particular, in diving, you always want to have a neutral buoyancy: this means that if you are standing still in water and you have a neutral buyoancy, you don't sink nor come back to surface

you have a neutral buoyancy if you "displace" always the correct volume of water.. in other words, you always need to occupy about the same volume: if you go in deep water, the water pressure will "reduce" your volume, so to mantain a neutral buoyancy you have to inflate air in your buoyancy compensator jacket to expand its volume.
otherway, if you're coming back to surface, pressure reduces and your body occupies more volume, so you have to deflate your jacket.

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Jul 30, 2017


it depends on the quality of the mask and it depends on how you stored it (if you leaved it at sunlight, if you washed it thoroughly after using it in the sea...)
i have a mid quality mask Mares mask, i have been using about 20 times for snorkeling, then i used it to take diving certifications in pool, then i used it for about other 20 dives in the sea... i always stored it in a dark bag (the mask is now about 8 years old)
you can check if you mask is still in good shape, and the silicone has not worn out, in this simple way: just put the mask on your face without straps.. remove all the air inside the mask by inhaling with your nose.. then look at your feet (keep inhaling): if the mask remains on your face you can keep using it

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Jul 29, 2017


The two main types of dive computers are wrist dive computers and console dive computers. Wrist dive computers are actually just like wrist-watches (a little bigger) and are worn on the diver's wrist. Right now, they are smallest dive computers available.

Console dive computers are attached to the diver's equipment by a hose. Main difference between console dive and wrist dive computers is that console dive computers include pressure devices in them.

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Nov 29, 2016


how to make schools project's jaws of life

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Mar 03, 2016


You need to consult with a factory technician. Your life depends on these devices. I am certified in USD Survivair and no one can set those after a rebuild kit without special tools and measuring devices.

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Jul 26, 2015


Yes...the octopus does exist.

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Mar 02, 2015


I would say no. The water in the pipe that is above sea level will drop back in the pipe until it reaches sea level. Provided neither end of the pipe whether above or below the sea is blocked the level in the pipe will always find natural sea level so it wont be higher or lower than sea level. So in answer to your question No it wont pour out.

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Jun 18, 2014


Most scuba stores can provide you with the glue.

Scuba Diving &... | Answered on Jan 10, 2014

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exactly snorkels work when under water

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