Question about 1981 Honda GL 1100 Innerstate Gold Wing

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Valve train noise

I have 1981 Honda Goldwing and the mechanical valve lifters and rocker arms make a ticking noise after the oil warms up.I have set the valves to specs and have set them a couple of thousands tighter and either way they still tick. Any solutionws would be helpful.

Posted by rtrudie on

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The ticking sound is most likely caused by uneven wear on the cam lobes. The next time you've got the valve covers off, take a look at the cams and you will likely see scuff marks on one or more of the high-points of the camshaft lobes. This can cause a ticking sound each time that part of the lobe comes in contact with the rocker arm. The only cure for this would be to replace the cam and rocker arms - which is not worth the many $$ it will cost. The noise may be annoying, but isn't anything to worry about. My Goldwing started making a ticking sound at about 90,000 miles - and continues to this day, now with more than 169,000 miles on the engine.
Uneven cam lobe wear can also cause lateral movement of the rocker arms - and a ticking sound as the rockers move slightly sideways on their shafts (note the springs on the shafts that hold the rockers lightly to one side).
I should also mention that pitted valve stem tips can also cause a ticking noise. In any event, do not run the engine with less than the specified .004" valve tappet clearance as this can cause valve damage and compression loss.

Posted on May 28, 2010

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How to instal valv lifters


Pull intake off pull off valve covers,loosin rocker arm bolts and remove ,, pull push rods out, after you have the push rods out you can pull the lifters out,,,,,,i suggest taking to a mechanic shop,,, if all you have is a ticking sound try this,,, buy a can of chemtol spray,,,chemtol only,,, with the little red straw for spraying,,,remove valve cover,,try to see if you can hear which lift or lifts is ticking,,,turn off car,,,loosen not remove that rocker arm,,,slid to the side,,count your turns,,,move rocker to the side,,, take chemtol spray and insert little spray straw and spray it down the hole in the center of the push rod ,, it will clean the lifter of the debris that is not letting it prime up,, repeat if nessary,, it works,,, see YOU TUBE,,, dirty oil causes this,,, put in clean oil and some lucas oil treatment to help prevent in future,,, keep oil changed ,,if it starts ticking again change oil and add more lucas,,, it might fix itself

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Ticking noise in my engine


Hi there:
First I sugest to check this information about "engine noses"...
ENGINE CLICKING NOISES
A clicking or tapping noise that gets louder when you rev the engine is probably "tappet" or upper valvetrain noise caused by one of several things: low oil pressure, excessive valve lash, or worn or damaged parts.

First, check the engine dipstick to see if the oil level is low. If low, add oil to bring it back up to the full mark. Is the engine still noisy? Check your oil pressure. A low gauge reading (or oil warning light) would indicate a serious internal engine problem that is preventing normal oil pressure from reaching the upper valvetrain components. The cause might be a worn or damaged oil pump, a clogged oil pump pickup screen or a plugged up oil filter. Using too thick a viscosity of motor oil during cold weather can also slow down the flow of oil to the upper valvetrain, causing noise and wear.

COLLAPSED LIFTER NOISE
Worn, leaky or dirty lifters can also cause valvetrain noise. If oil delivery is restricted to the lifters (plugged oil galley or low oil pressure), the lifters won't "pump up" to take up the normal slack in the valvetrain. A "collapsed" lifter will then allow excessive valve lash and noise.

VALVE LASH NOISE
If you can rule out lubrication-related problems as a cause, the next step would be to remove the valve cover(s) and check valve lash. On older import engines, mechanical lifters require periodic valve lash adjustments (typically every 30,000 miles). Too much space between the tips of the rocker arms and valve stems can make the valvetrain noisy -- and possibly cause accelerated wear of both parts.

To measure (and adjust) valve lash, you need a feeler gauge. The gauge is slid between the tip of the valve stem and rocker arm (or the cam follower or the cam itself on overhead cam engines) when the piston is at top dead center (valve fully closed). Refer to a manual for the specified lash and adjustment procedure. Also, note whether the lash spec is for a hot or cold engine (this makes a big difference!).

On engines with hydraulic lifters, oil pressure pumps up the lifters when the engine is running to maintain zero lash in the valvetrain. This results in quiet operation. So if the rocker arms are clattering, it tells you something is amiss (bad lifter or worn or damaged parts) or the rocker arms need adjusting.

DAMAGED ENGINE PARTS NOISE
Inspect the valvetrain components. Excessive wear on the ends of the rocker arms, cam followers (overhead cam engines) and/or valve stems can open up the valve lash and cause noise. So too can a bent pushrod or a broken valve spring.

RAPPING OR DEEP KNOCKING ENGINE SOUND
Usually bad news. A deep rapping noise from the engine is usually "rod knock," a condition brought on by extreme bearing wear or damage. If the rod bearings are worn or loose enough to make a dull, hammering noise, you're driving on borrowed time. Sooner or later one of the bearings will fail, and when it does one of two things will happen: the bearing will seize and lock up the engine, or it will attempt to seize and break a rod. Either way your engine will suffer major damage and have to be rebuilt or replaced.

Bearing noise is not unusual in high mileage engines as well as those that have been neglected and have not had the oil and filter changed regularly. It can also be caused by low oil pressure, using too light a viscosity oil, oil breakdown, dirty oil or dirt in the crankcase, excessive blowby from worn rings and/or cylinders (gasoline dilutes and thins the oil), incorrect engine assembly (bearings too loose), loose or broken connecting rod bolts, or abusive driving.

Bearing wear can be checked by dropping the oil pan and inspecting the rod and main bearings. If the bearings are badly worn, damaged or loose, replacing the bearings may buy you some time. But if the bearings are badly worn or damaged, the crankshaft will probably have to be resurfaced - which means a complete engine overhaul or replacing the engine is the vehicle is worth the expense.

ENGINE PINGS OR KNOCKS WHEN ACCELERATING
The cause here may be Spark Knock (Detonation) caused by an inoperative EGR valve, overadvanced ignition timing, engine overheating, carbon buildup in the combustion chambers, or low octane fuel.

Hope this helps; also keep in mind that your feedback is important and I`ll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment about this answer.

Thank you for using FixYa, have a nice day.

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TAPPING IN VALVES


ENGINE CLICKING NOISES
A clicking or tapping noise that gets louder when you rev the engine is probably "tappet" or upper valvetrain noise caused by one of several things: low oil pressure, excessive valve lash, or worn or damaged parts.
First, check the engine dipstick to see if the oil level is low. If low, add oil to bring it back up to the full mark. Is the engine still noisy? Check your oil pressure. A low gauge reading (or oil warning light) would indicate a serious internal engine problem that is preventing normal oil pressure from reaching the upper valvetrain components. The cause might be a worn or damaged oil pump, a clogged oil pump pickup screen or a plugged up oil filter. Using too thick a viscosity of motor oil during cold weather can also slow down the flow of oil to the upper valvetrain, causing noise and wear.
COLLAPSED LIFTER NOISE
Worn, leaky or dirty lifters can also cause valvetrain noise. If oil delivery is restricted to the lifters (plugged oil galley or low oil pressure), the lifters won't "pump up" to take up the normal slack in the valvetrain. A "collapsed" lifter will then allow excessive valve lash and noise.
VALVE LASH NOISE
If you can rule out lubrication-related problems as a cause, the next step would be to remove the valve cover(s) and check valve lash. On older import engines, mechanical lifters require periodic valve lash adjustments (typically every 30,000 miles). Too much space between the tips of the rocker arms and valve stems can make the valvetrain noisy -- and possibly cause accelerated wear of both parts.
To measure (and adjust) valve lash, you need a feeler gauge. The gauge is slid between the tip of the valve stem and rocker arm (or the cam follower or the cam itself on overhead cam engines) when the piston is at top dead center (valve fully closed). Refer to a manual for the specified lash and adjustment procedure. Also, note whether the lash spec is for a hot or cold engine (this makes a big difference!).
On engines with hydraulic lifters, oil pressure pumps up the lifters when the engine is running to maintain zero lash in the valvetrain. This results in quiet operation. So if the rocker arms are clattering, it tells you something is amiss (bad lifter or worn or damaged parts) or the rocker arms need adjusting.

Let me know if you have any other questions.  Thanks for rating my response and for using FixYa!

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