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I replaced voltage regulator, I was connecting the positive on the battery, it sparked and now everything is dead

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  • Motorcycles Master
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Your probably blew a fuse. always always connect the neg cable last. oh and remove it first

Posted on Sep 15, 2019

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5 Suggested Answers

s60six

  • 328 Answers

SOURCE: voltage regulator

it's in the alternator,the easiest way to fix it is to replace the alternator.

Posted on Dec 28, 2008

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rockitman187

Randy Hough

  • 2559 Answers

SOURCE: 1972 Ford F100 Alternator/Voltage Regulator wiring

Here is what you need.

09a463c.jpg

Please rate this a fixya

Posted on Feb 09, 2009

csmock132

Clint Smock

  • 4669 Answers

SOURCE: 1979 Ford Thunderbird alternator not charging

Are the connections really dirty at the voltage regulator? These tend to get corrosion on them and cause weird charging system issues. Also make sure the ground is good on the regulator.

Posted on Jul 04, 2009

Anonymous

  • 113 Answers

SOURCE: 84 ford F350 6.9 diesel charging system not

look for a fusible link out. You need to check for output on the alternator that you installed. make sure the batteries are fully charged before that, otherwise its not going to read right. start from the source. also, you can disconnect the batteries from the sys and do a continuity check on the wires in the loom, so you can see if current has a path, or if you have an open circuit. hope this helps

Posted on Jul 25, 2009

czaa

Arnie Burke

  • 6179 Answers

SOURCE: Voltage Regulator Problem?

u want to chec alternator as well-ther r test u can do so buy a clymer manual which r very detailed-iv seen hd books in library sec 629

Posted on Aug 19, 2009

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2000 chevy astro van everything dead no power tonothing is there a mainfuse somewhere all the fuses are good


Did you check for voltage, anywhere, use a test lite follow the positive battery connections check for voltage. Did you check fuse circuit for voltage? Even if the fuse is good, if no voltage at fuse circuit, the circuit is still dead. Of course voltage is no good without ground.

The battery circuits, positive and negative good?

Mar 27, 2015 | 2000 Chevrolet Astro

1 Answer

2005 Honda CBF 500 ABS battery runs dead and the engine cut's off


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
5. Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
6. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from the regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from the regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads for viewing or printing that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
HOW TO CHECK YOUR CHARGING SYSTEM and CHANGING the STATOR and REGULATOR...
Honda CB500T Manual
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda
Honda CBF500 Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e


Feb 13, 2014 | 2005 Honda CBF 500 ABS

1 Answer

Hero Honda 2nd CDI unit has blown along with a few bulbs in a month


Hi, Anonymous before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test if necessary, you may have a preliminary reading of 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage, the battery is faulty and must be replaced. AGM type batteries fall into this scenario more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator Ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
How To Fix Motorcycle Battery Charging System
Troubleshooting Motorcycle Electrical Circuits Quick Simple Methods 92...
How to Test Batteries Fuses and Relays Electrical Diagnosis 101
http://www.partsfish.com/page/oem-parts-for-honda

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e




Jun 26, 2017 | Hero Honda Motorcycles

1 Answer

Dead battery on a 2000 Yamaha road star


Hi, Masseybrett before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Dead battery
Re Parasitic Battery Drain Road Star Forum Yamaha Road Star
Yamaha XV16AL Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
YAMAHA XV1600A Owner Manual

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e

Sep 24, 2011 | 2002 Yamaha Road Star

1 Answer

2010 Yamaha Mio with 5000km has dead battery. First time - went to start in morning and it's dead. Attempted to try 3 times. Turned over very slowly. Sat for 5 minutes - suddenly started quickly - no...


Hi, Janara500 before testing any electrical component in the Charging System it is "IMPERATIVE" that you have a fully charged battery of 12.5 volts or more and be able to pass a proper "LOAD" test because your battery may have 12.5 volts or more but little or zero amperage and must be replaced AGM types more so than lead acid batteries.
1. Battery Test:
The battery needs to be a fully charged and load tested to ensure proper readings, connections need to be clean and tight. If you are not working with a fully charged and functional battery, all other voltage tests will be incorrect. Standing battery Voltage should be 12.5-13.2 DCV.
2. Charging System Voltage Test:
Start motorcycle, measure DC volts across the battery terminals you should have a reading of approximately 13.2-15 DC Volts.
3. Connections and wires:
Inspect the regulator stator plug, and check the battery terminals for connection corrosion. If everything seems to be in order, move on to number 4 below to determine if there's a failed component.
4. Stator Checks/Rotor Check: Each of the following tests isolates the Stator & Rotor. If AC output and resistance test fail and stator test passes then the rotor is at fault (Pull Primary covers and inspect rotor for damage).
5. AC Output Check:
Unplug the regulator plug from the stator start motorcycle and change Voltmeter to AC volts. Probe both stator wires with your meter lead. The motorcycle should be putting out approximately 18-20 ACV per 1,000 rpm. Reading will vary depending on system, check service manual specification
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
32 amp system produces about 16-20 VAC per 1,000 rpm
45 amp system produces about 19-26 VAC per 1,000 rpm
Stator Resistance Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale. Probe each stator wires with meter leads and check resistance on the meter.
Resistance should be in the range of 0.1-0.5 Ohms. Reading will vary depending on the system, check the service manual for specifications.
Generic Specs:
22 amp system produces about 0.2 to 0.4 ohms
32 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
45 amp system produces about 0.1 to 0.2 ohms
Stator ground Check:
Switch your multimeter to Ohm x 1 scale.
Probe each stator wire with your positive lead on the multimeter and the negative to ground.
There should be no continuity to ground on either wire.
If there is continuity your stator is shorted to ground and must be replaced.
5. Regulator Test:
Each of the following tests isolates the regulator only, so if any of these tests fail, the regulator is at fault.
Identifying Wires:
Battery Charge Lead- Wire going from regulator to battery positive.
AC output leads- Wires coming from the Stator to the regulator.
Ground- Wire from Regulator to ground or regulator may be grounded via the physical bolting to chassis.
Regulator Ground Test: Ensure the regulator body is grounded or grounding wire is fastened tightly to a good ground (you should verify this by checking continuity from regulator body to chassis ground).
Fwd/Reverse Bias Test/Diode Test:
This check is testing the Diode function to ensure it is regulating the AC current for the stator into DC Current.
Switch multimeter to Diode Scale.
Place your Multimeter positive lead on each AC output wire.
Place your multimeter negative lead on the battery Charge wire.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the AC output wires and the Positive lead on the Battery Charge Wire. The reading should be Infinite. With your meter on the same setting, place your multimeter positive lead on the regulator ground wire or to the regulator directly, and then place your meter negative lead on the AC output leads.
The meter should read voltage typically around .5 volts.
Next, switch your multimeter leads putting the negative lead on the regulator ground and the Positive lead on the AC output wires. The reading should be Infinite.
Note: Below is a table to show the readings:
Positive Lead Negative Lead Reading
AC output 1 Battery charge lead Voltage
AC output 2 Battery Charge Lead Voltage
Battery charge lead AC output 1 ?
Battery charge lead AC output 2 ?
Ground AC output 1 Voltage
Ground AC output 2 Voltage
AC output 1 Ground ?
AC output 2 Ground ?
For more information about your issue and valuable "FREE" downloads that you will need please click on the blue links below. Good luck and have a wonderful day.
Fast charge mio
http://racetechelectric.com/files/pdf/rte_troubleshooting_flow_chart.pdf
Yamaha Mio Service Manual
OEM parts for Yamaha
Yamaha Owner Manuals

Btw, I’m available to help over the phone in case u need at https://www.6ya.com/expert/gregg_c0ec1df182c7330e


May 10, 2017 | Yamaha Motorcycles

1 Answer

1992 pontaic sunbird GT 3.1L V6 when I turn the ignition key to the position just before crank, everything seems normal for about 3 seconds, battery gauge shows full charge, gauges do their little...


SOUND LIKE DEAD BATTERY.HAVE BATTERY CHECKED AND REPLACED.MAKE SURE ALTERNATOR CHARGING BATTERY.WITH ENGINE IDLING BATTERY VOLTAGE OUTPUT AT BATTERY SHOULD BE 13.5 - 14.5 VOLTS. IF NOT CHECK ALTERNATOR BATTERY FEED WIRE AND VOLTAGE REGULATOR WIRES FOR DAMAGE OR LOOSE CONNECTIONS,CHECK ALTERNATOR FUSE AND MAKE SURE ALTERNATOR DRIVE BELT NOT LOOSE SLIPPING OR BROKEN.

Jun 26, 2011 | Pontiac Sunbird Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Bike lost all power while riding. Lights, guages, and everything else. Stayed operational for a little while, then started backfiring very bad, and finally left me on the side of the road. The battery...


it is most lightly the stator or voltage regulator in your charging system not charging your battery while running, thus runs the battery dead. If your battery is completely drained, which usually is the sign when you have no lights and backfires and the battery has no juice left to support the spark plugs, and finally gives up, and thus won't take a jump. This is a common problem. Battery needs to go on a charger and fully charged before you can conduct any electrical output test from the stator or voltage regulator. Just happened to me again this week. Hope this helps.

Aug 17, 2010 | Harley Davidson XL 1200 C Sportster Custom...

2 Answers

Battery goes dead. disconnect the battery and jump the car and it is ok for about a month


Get a battery check first and have it charged. Then, switch off all lights, radio, ignition switch. Reconnect the charged battery negative ground first, then, the positive terminal. Find if there's a spark. if it does, then, you must check your electrical wiring since this is grounded. Do not connect the positive terminal. Clear the grounded connection first. If no spark, go ahead. Crank your engine, and let it run at neutral position. And check the voltage that goes out of the alternator, this must be more than 15 volts DC. Then check the voltage output of the regulator which must be 13
to 14 volts DC. However, if you cannot get the right voltage at the
alternator., you have to replace it. Then, you can check the regu-
lator output voltage, and get the right voltage. Get this done,. and
send your e-mail for the result.

Oct 04, 2009 | Cadillac DTS Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

The battery goes dead after a couple days riding and my headlight burns dim all the time


Check for loose or dirty wire connections at the parts under the seat and coming from the stator. Check fuse connections. Any wires disconnected? Any component, tail light, headlight, left "turned on"?

Put a voltmeter on the battery terminals and rev the bike to2000 rpm. The reading should be about 14 volts. If not, better have a dealer check out the stator, rectifier, voltage regulator and ignition switch.

Can I get a “very helpful” rating on this answer?

Aug 17, 2009 | Kymco Hipster 125 Motorcycles

1 Answer

1979 Ford Thunderbird alternator not charging


Are the connections really dirty at the voltage regulator? These tend to get corrosion on them and cause weird charging system issues. Also make sure the ground is good on the regulator.

Jul 04, 2009 | 1988 Ford F 150

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