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I cleaned the bottom bowls of the carb on my 78 650 and the first carb on the right hand side the gas is running out of the bottom nipple.

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Zuma 49cc overflow line leaking gas


floats sticking keeping it from stopping fuel fill in carb bowl. Result over flow and out ..try opening bottom screw on bottom of carb let fuel flow out than close screw.{located on bottom of carb bowl usually next to a nipple or fuel line} If that don't work tap on side of bowl with something. If that don't work your going to have to remove carb and investigate..good luck..

Dec 25, 2013 | 2005 Yamaha Zuma

1 Answer

Motorbike runs too rich


There are many reasons that an engine can run too rich, and the place to start is to be sure that running rich really is your problem. Running rich means that the fuel:air ration in your cylinders is too high. That means that there is too much gas and not enough air getting to the cylinder. The easiest way to verify that your bike is running rich is to run the bike for a little while, then pull out the spark plugs and take a look. If they are covered with dark black carbon build up, then your bike is in fact running rich. Be sure to check all four plugs to see if all your cylinders are rich or just a few of them.

If you are running rich, then you almost certainly have something improperly adjusted in your carburetors. If you are not the kind of person who likes to work with small parts, and keep your workbench organized, then working with carbs is probably not for you. But if you do like to tear things apart and get to the heart of them, then press on and we'll have your bike running right in no time.

The most likely cause of running rich is that your bowls are flooded. the bowl is the bottom part of the carb where the gas sits, and your bike has four of them. each one has a flat-head screw on the bottom side, and a nearby nipple where you can connect a piece of clear hose. Connect a clear plastic hose to the nipple, and then use a flat screw driver to loosen (but not remove) that screw. When you loosen the screw, gas will flow from the bowl into the hose. Hold the hose up to the side, and the gas level should be about even with the seam where your bowl connects to the body of the carb. If the gas level is any higher than that, then your bowls are flooded. That means that your float needle seats are not sealing correctly inside the carbs. This can be caused by having pieces of debris or rust clogging the float needle seat, or by having old worn out float needles. you can remove the carbs from the bike and check each float needle individually. The rubber tips should be cone-shaped, and come to a nice point. The brass seats should be clean and free of debris. Clean everything out with carburetor cleaner from your local napa or auto zone, and put it back together. Be sure not to get carb cleaner on your float needles or other rubber parts though as it will dissolve the float needles. If your float needles are worn, then they will need to be replaced. If the inside of the carbs are just dirty or gummy, then clean them out until they are nice and clean.

If your bowls were not flooded, then you may have a problem with the fuel jets. A lot of people take carburetors apart to clean them, and get the little brass jets in the wrong place when they put it back together. Each jet has a tiny number inscribed on its top surface. The bottom side of the carburetor (inside the bowl) has two jets that look similar and have identical threads, but the holes that go through them are not identical. The main jet is the one that goes right in the middle of the carb and screws into the brass needle jet. It's size is around 120. The pilot jet goes off to the side and its size is around 35. The threads on these jets are identical, but if you get them in the wrong place, then your bike will always run rich -- especially at idle. Check all four carbs to be sure that the jets are correct. Another good indication that you have the jets switched is if you can easily start the bike without choke even if it is dead cold.

If both the jets and the fuels levels look good, then you may have more serious problems. But those two are the most likely cause. Those are things that are easily overlooked by first-time mechanics, and they are pretty easy to fix if you have patience and are willing to deal with the small parts that go inside of carburetors.

Good Luck,
-Josh

Nov 14, 2010 | 1985 Yamaha XJ 700 X Maxim

2 Answers

Poulan snowblower with tecumseh engine runs briefly when carb cleaner sprayed on carb, then dies. Replaced the gas with 93 octane. Has only been used one season...seems like it can't get its gas...


Hi
This is a common problem with snow blowers becuase they set around more then they get used and the gas gets stale and cloggs up the carb. First thing to try is remove the bolt that holds the carb bowl on and clean it. It should have 1 or 2 holes through the side close to the bottem and 1 hole about half way up. If this doesn't do the trick you need to remove the whole carb disassemble and soak it in carb cleaner.
Sam

Jan 06, 2010 | Poulan Pro 22" Self Propelled High Wheel...

1 Answer

How do I clean the carburetor?


ALWAYS have a fire extinguisher on hand when working on carburetors.
Remove the water trap bowl at the bottom of the petcock, (gas valve). Is there any water or trash in the bowl? Drain a cup of gas from the tank. Is there any water or trash in the cup? Dump it, clean it and re-mount it, ( not all bikes have a water trap bowl ).

Drain the carburetor. There should be a screw on the lower side or bottom of the carb float bowl. Remove the screw then replace it after the fuel drains. Install a new stock NGK spark plug and clean the air filter. If the bike still doesn't start and run properly then shut off the gas and remove the carburetor from the engine.

Remove the float bowl and clean the entire carb with a spray carb cleaner from the auto parts store. Wear protective goggles to avoid getting spray in your eyes. Spray into all the little airways and fittings in the carb. Remove the idle screw and the air screw on the outside throat of the
carb and spray into the screw holes as well.
< < READ CLOSELY > >
Be sure to put these two screws back in the same hole they came out of. IMPORTANT > do not tighten these two adjusters down. Only screw these in until they LIGHTLY seat. Now turn each adjuster one and one half turns outward. Re-
install the carb. Let the float bowl fill then start the engine.

Please rate this solution. Thanks!

Aug 18, 2009 | 2005 Qianjiang QJ125T-4A

2 Answers

Fuel line issues on Yamaha Timber Wolf ATV


That was an atmospheric vent you found that should not have gas in it. If it does, the carb has over flowed. It probably needs to be cleaned with special attention paid to the needle valve and float assemblies.It is routed up high to prevent water and debris from entering it and clogging it up. It should have holes for it to pass through on the snorkel coming out of the air box behind the gas tank under the seat.

Jun 28, 2009 | 2000 Yamaha YZF-R1

3 Answers

Yamaha blaster runs but wont rev


ALWAYS have a fire extinguisher on hand when working on carburetors.
Remove the water trap bowl at the bottom of the petcock, (gas valve). Is there any water or trash in the bowl? Drain a cup of gas from the tank. Is there any water or trash in the cup? Dump it, clean it and re-mount it, ( not all bikes have a water trap bowl ).

Drain the carburetor. There should be a screw on the lower side of the carb float bowl. Remove the screw then replace it after the fuel drains. Turn the gas back on and wait a minute for the carb to fill with gas. Install a new stock NGK spark plug and try to start the engine. If the bike doesn't start and run properly then shut off the gas and remove the carburetor from the engine.

Remove the float bowl and clean the entire carb with a spray carb cleaner from the auto parts store. Wear protective goggles to avoid getting spray in your eyes. Spray into all the little airways and fittings in the carb.
Before putting the slide back in the throat of the carb, move the clip on the jet needle one notch lower. Put the rest of the carb back together, clean the air filter and install the carb. Let the float bowl fill then start the engine. This process should get you back on the road.

849880b.gif Please rate this solution. Thanks!

Jun 21, 2009 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250

1 Answer

Can you help me?


It sounds like condensation in the gas tank has reached a point where water in the gas is a problem.

Drain the carburetors. There should be a screw on the lower side or bottom of each carb float bowl. Remove the screw then replace it after the fuel drains. Remove the water trap bowl at the bottom of the petcock, (gas valve). Is there any water or trash in the bowl? Drain a cup of gas from the tank. Is there any water or trash in the cup? Dump it, clean it and re-mount it, (not all bikes have a water trap bowl). Turn the gas back on and wait a minute for the carbs to fill with gas. If the bike doesn't start and run properly then shut off the gas and remove the carburetors from the engine.

FOR EACH carb > Remove the float bowl and clean the entire carb with a spray carb cleaner from the auto parts store. Wear protective goggles to avoid getting spray in your eyes. Spray into all the little airways and fittings in the carb. Put the carb back together and install. Clean or replace the air filter and install an in-line fuel filter. Let the float bowl fill then start the engine. This process should get you back on the road. ALWAYS have a fire extinguisher at hand when working on carburetors.


A “very helpful” rating for this answer? Thanks!

Jun 19, 2009 | 1997 Honda VT 1100 C2 Shadow Sabre

1 Answer

Went to reserve fuel - then motor backfiring and loss of power -


Condensation in the gas tank collects at the fuel petcock. Get enough water in there and it gets into the carbs. ALWAYS have a fire extinguisher on hand when working on carburetors.
Remove the water trap bowl at the bottom of the petcock, (gas valve). Is there any water or trash in the bowl? Drain a cup of gas from the tank. Is there any water or trash in the cup? Dump it, clean it and re-mount it, ( not all bikes have a water trap bowl ).

Drain the carburetors. There should be a screw on the lower side or bottom of the carb float bowl. Remove the screw then replace it after the fuel drains. Turn the gas back on and wait a minute for the carb to fill with gas. If the bike doesn't start and run properly then shut off the gas and remove the carburetor from the engine.

Remove the float bowl and clean the entire carb with a spray carb cleaner from the auto parts store. Wear protective goggles to avoid getting spray in your eyes. Spray into all the little airways and fittings in the carb.
Put the carb back together and install the carb. Let the float bowl fill then start the engine. This process should get you back on the road.

Jun 18, 2009 | 2004 Honda Shadow 400

2 Answers

Dirt bike turn over but wont stay running


ALWAYS have a fire extinguisher on hand when working on carburetors.
Remove the water trap bowl at the bottom of the petcock, (gas valve). Is there any water or trash in the bowl? Drain a cup of gas from the tank. Is there any water or trash in the cup? Dump it, clean it and re-mount it, ( not all bikes have a water trap bowl ). Fill the tank and use only premium gas.

Drain the carburetor. There should be a screw on the lower side or bottom of the carb float bowl. Remove the screw then replace it after the fuel drains. Turn the gas back on and wait a minute for the carb to fill with gas. Install a new stock NGK spark plug and try to start the engine. If the bike doesn't start and run properly then shut off the gas and remove the carburetor from the engine.

Remove the float bowl and clean the entire carb with a spray carb cleaner from the auto parts store. Wear protective goggles to avoid getting spray in your eyes. Spray into all the little airways and fittings in the carb. Remove the idle screw and the air screw on the outside throat of the
carb and spray into the screw holes as well.
< < READ CLOSELY > >
Be sure to put these two screws back in the same hole they came out of. IMPORTANT > do not tighten these two adjusters down. Only screw these in until they LIGHTLY seat. Now turn each adjuster one and one half turns outward. Put the rest of the
carb back together, clean the air filter and install the carb. Let the float bowl fill then start the engine. This process should get you back on the road.

A “very helpful” rating for this answer? Thanks!

Jun 14, 2009 | 2003 Yamaha YZ 250

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