Question about 2011 Harley Davidson FLHTCUTG Tri Glide Ultra Classic

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Changing rear brake pads on a 2011 tri glide ultra classic

Do i need to do anything to the parking brake in order to change right rear brake pads - piston seem to be stuck

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Doug Stante

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A TriGlide's rear brakes are quite different from a two-wheeled Ultra, which seems to be what everyone has been talking about. In order to change the pads:
While the bike is on the ground, break the lug nuts loose on both sides. Release the parking brake. Then lift the bike so that the rear tires are far enough off the ground that you can take a rear tire off and get it out from under the fender.
Start with the left rear tire, as it is the furthest away from the master cylinder. With the tire out of the way, you can see the caliper. You'll see a lever on the caliper for the parking brake on the inboard side of the caliper. There is n Ny-Lock type nut on the lever shaft. Remove the nut and lever, and back the bolt out. The bolt is what applies pressure to the caliper piston when you set the parking brake, and if it isn't backed out enough, it will prevent you from pushing the piston sufficiently to put the new pads in.
There are two bolts in the caliper that capture the pads. Remove the bolts and pads. You can use one of the pads and a C-clamp to now push the piston in. Or, you may be able to push the piston in by hand.
While you have the caliper off, there is a bushing on the top and bottom that allows the caliper to self-center as the pads wear. They should move in and out of the caliper housing with a little resistance. It's a good idea to check them, and take them out and clean and lubricate them with a thin coat of anti-sieze and reinstall. If they have a lot of corrosion on them, you may want to replace.
It's also recommended that you bleed the brakes, as the brake fluid has a tendency to absorb moisture over time. As the fluid gets hot, the water will cause bubbles to form, and you'll loose stopping power. (Don't try to bleed the brakes until the pads and caliper have been reinstalled and bolted in over the rotor)
Install the new pads, and reinstall the caliper. The pad kit you bought from H-D should have new bolts to put in the caliper for the parking brake, so replace the bolt, running it in far enough so you feel it contacting the piston. Put the lever back on so that it is resting against the stop on the caliper in the fully released position, and put a new Ny-Lock nut on that should have come in the kit.
Now bleed the brake line. Keep bleeding until clear fluid flows, being sure you don't introduce air into the line.
When everything has been tightened to the proper torque, put the tire and lug nuts back on. Repeat for the right side.
Once you've got everything back together, back off the adjustment on the parking brake lever, and then set the brake. If the brakes don't hold when you push the bike, release the lever and tighten the adjustment. Repeat until the brakes hold the bike. Make sure you tighten the set screw the holds the lever adjustment in position.
You should then be good to go. Be sure to wash down any brake fluid that may have dripped, as it will ruin paint finishes.

Posted on Jul 14, 2013

  • Doug Stante Jul 14, 2013

    A TriGlide's rear brakes are quite different from a two-wheeled Ultra, which seems to be what everyone has been talking about. In order to change the pads:
    While the bike is on the ground, break the lug nuts loose on both sides. Release the parking brake. Then lift the bike so that the rear tires are far enough off the ground that you can take a rear tire off and get it out from under the fender.
    Start with the left rear tire, as it is the furthest away from the master cylinder. With the tire out of the way, you can see the caliper. You'll see a lever on the caliper for the parking brake on the inboard side of the caliper. There is n Ny-Lock type nut on the lever shaft. Remove the nut and lever, and back the bolt out. The bolt is what applies pressure to the caliper piston when you set the parking brake, and if it isn't backed out enough, it will prevent you from pushing the piston sufficiently to put the new pads in.
    There are two bolts in the caliper that capture the pads. Remove the bolts and pads. You can use one of the pads and a C-clamp to now push the piston in. Or, you may be able to push the piston in by hand.
    While you have the caliper off, there is a bushing on the top and bottom that allows the caliper to self-center as the pads wear. They should move in and out of the caliper housing with a little resistance. It's a good idea to check them, and take them out and clean and lubricate them with a thin coat of anti-sieze and reinstall. If they have a lot of corrosion on them, you may want to replace.
    It's also recommended that you bleed the brakes, as the brake fluid has a tendency to absorb moisture over time. As the fluid gets hot, the water will cause bubbles to form, and you'll loose stopping power. (Don't try to bleed the brakes until the pads and caliper have been reinstalled and bolted in over the rotor)
    Install the new pads, and reinstall the caliper. The pad kit you bought from H-D should have new bolts to put in the caliper for the parking brake, so replace the bolt, running it in far enough so you feel it contacting the piston. Put the lever back on so that it is resting against the stop on the caliper in the fully released position, and put a new Ny-Lock nut on that should have come in the kit.
    Now bleed the brake line. Keep bleeding until clear fluid flows, being sure you don't introduce air into the line.
    When everything has been tightened to the proper torque, put the tire and lug nuts back on. Repeat for the right side.
    Once you've got everything back together, back off the adjustment on the parking brake lever, and then set the brake. If the brakes don't hold when you push the bike, release the lever and tighten the adjustment. Repeat until the brakes hold the bike. Make sure you tighten the set screw the holds the lever adjustment in position.
    You should then be good to go. Be sure to wash down any brake fluid that may have dripped, as it will ruin paint finishes.

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5 Related Answers

Anonymous

  • 69 Answers

SOURCE: How do I change the front and rear brakes on a

Not too hard - Undo the two bolts on the caliper and then seperate the caliper and pull the old ones out. Insert the new ones and put the bolts back in to hold the caliper back together and then install them back on the bike with the two retaining bolts. Use a bit of lock tight (Blue) on the threads. Warning do not let anyone apply pressure on the brakes while you have them off the bike or you will have a mess and/or a problem.

Posted on Jun 21, 2009

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Anonymous

  • 2336 Answers

SOURCE: replace rear brake pads

Remove right saddlebag, pull the two caliper mounting bolts and remove the caliper. Do not open bleeder or disconnect line. You will need to push a large screwdriver between the old pads before removing them in order to push the pucks back into the caliper or the new pads will not spread enough to reinstall. Then pull the two smaller bolts from the caliper and the pads will fall out. The pads are different for inside and outside, so pay attention, and remember, after reinstalling, before riding, be sure to pump brake pedal, and it may take a few stops before brakes stop as effectively as before.

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

Anonymous

  • 12 Answers

SOURCE: I have a 2007 Electra glide Ultra Classic. The cruise will not e

You may need a new ECM module .

Posted on Oct 26, 2009

wd4ity

wd4ity

  • 4565 Answers

SOURCE: i need to change the rear brake pads on my hd

To change the pads on your bike, look at the caliper and you'll see two bolts that hold it into the caliper bracket. Remove these two bolts. Rock the caliper in towards the wheel and back out a few times to loosen everything up and carefully remove the caliper from the bracket without disturning the pads or the anti-rattle hardware.

Take special note of how the anti-rattle hardware is positioned in the caliper bracket. Now, replace the pads and hardware with new parts. Make sure you install the inside pad with the fiber side towards the rotor. Don't laugh, you'd be surprised at how many I've seen installed backwards.

Now, next you must get the piston pressed back into it's bore. I use either a large C-clamp or a large pair of slip joint pliers to press the piston back into it's bore. Use rags or thin pieces of wood to protect the finish on your caliper. Once you get the piston all the way back down in the bore, carefully slide it back down over the pads without disturbing them. Replace the two screws and torque them to 35-40 foot pounds.

Slowly depress the rear brake pedal until you get a nice firm brake pedal. Make sure you test the brakes before you ride the bike at any high speeds. Failure to test the brakes for proper operation can cause severe injury or death.

Good Luck.
Steve

Posted on Aug 16, 2010

wd4ity

wd4ity

  • 4565 Answers

SOURCE: How to change the front

Take the two bolts out that hold the front caliper onto the fork slider. Lift the caliper off and take the pads out. You must compress the brake caliper piston back into the caliper body. I usually use a large C-clamp or a large slip joint pliers to compress the piston back into the caliper. Protect the finish on your caliper with rags or thin pieces of wood. Once you get the piston back into the caliper, replace the pads with the new ones making certain that the fiber side of the pad is facing towards the rotor. Put the caliper back into position and reinstall the two bolts. Torque them to 25 foot pounds of torque. Work the front brake lever until you have a full firm brake.

Good Luck
Steve

Posted on May 02, 2011

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