Question about 1989 Suzuki GSX 550 EF

1 Answer

Bleeding front brakes

I just got some work done on my bike and had the forks changed....so the front calipers were removed and reintalled. After that, I changed the entire right clip-on with master cylinder. I'm tring to bleed the front brakes but not getting anywhere with it. I bought a $7 bleeder from autozone and started by bleeding the calipers first one side at a time. I slightly loosened the nut, insert the bleeder tip, pressed in the lever, loosen the nut more and fluid starts to go through the bleeder, then tighten the nut and pump the brake lever once...repeated this until fluid is clearly through the bleeder line with no bubbles. I did this for both caliper and then the nipple next to the master cylinder. If the bike is standing still, I can pump the lever and start to feel tension after a couple of pumps, but once I start moving, it just dies, and there is no tension. I tried pumping the lever while going abt 5mhp and I could feel it starting to work, but after a while, it goes back to the same problem... This is my first time bleeding any brakes, any help would be appreciate. thanks,

Posted by zizi tripo on

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Anonymous

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  • Master
  • 2,336 Answers

Bleed the master first, make sure that there is plenty of fluid going through there and all the air is out. Then, once the master is fully bled, the fluid will pull through the lines quickly. Just do one line at a time, and once you do them both and get good pressure you want to zip tie the lever to the bar overnight to make sure you get all the little bubbles out. Hope that helps.

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

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Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: bleeding front brakes

Your $7 bleeder kit typically has a near useless one valve in it. Forget the kits such as these, they usually make things confusing for you.
Firts, make sure all teh brake lines are tightly connected and in good condition. If the flexible lines are over 5 years old, conside getting new ones made/fitted. Stainless/braided lines look good but are NOT necessary for any road bike.

All you need is a long piece of clear hose line (fish tank air line tubing usually works well) that fits the top of the bleed nipples very firmly. The hose should be long enough to hang over your handle bars, or be suspended by a wire or string so that the open end is higher than the master cylinder. You can use two such hoses and do both front calipers at the same time if you wish.

First, manouver the handle bars so that the top of the master cylinder is as level as possible, even to the point of undoing the grip clamp and rotating the whole assembly around the handle bars a bit. Then fit the clear hoses to the caliper bleed nipples.
Remove the top of the master cylinder reseviour and make sure the fluid is topped up. Watch this level the whole time, it is important that the fluid level never get below half full or you risk reintroducing air into the brake lines again. Never reuse old fluid, and always filter any new fluid that has been in the brake system before (run it through a new fuel filter if you are that hard up for money) you reuse it.
Then crack open the bleed nipples on the calipers so that you see fluid start to rise up the hoses ( which is why you want clear hoses). You can pump the lever a few times to get things happening quicker, just watch the master fluid level!
Keep pumping the lever and topping up the fluid level until the level in the tubes is at the same level as the master cylinder. Leave the bleeder nipples open and leave the bike alone for an hour.
After an hour, close the bleeder nipples and top up and refit the master cylinder reserviour cover.
Use a jar under each hose to catch the fluid, remove each hose from its bleeder and let the fluid drain out into the jar. Ditch the used fluid.
Reset the grip to its proper position if it was moved and test the brakes. Pump the lever two times and then release the lever for a few minutes ( at least 1 minute) If the brakes are still soft or wont hold pressure ( if you still have to pump the lever to get pressure, dont ride the bike!) then suspect worn master cylinder or buggered seals.

Posted on Jan 17, 2009

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Anonymous

  • 2336 Answers

SOURCE: bleeding front brakes

Bleed the master first, make sure that there is plenty of fluid going through there and all the air is out. Then, once the master is fully bled, the fluid will pull through the lines quickly. Just do one line at a time, and once you do them both and get good pressure you want to zip tie the lever to the bar overnight to make sure you get all the little bubbles out. Hope that helps.

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

Anonymous

  • 2336 Answers

SOURCE: bleeding front brakes

Bleed the master first, make sure that there is plenty of fluid going through there and all the air is out. Then, once the master is fully bled, the fluid will pull through the lines quickly. Just do one line at a time, and once you do them both and get good pressure you want to zip tie the lever to the bar overnight to make sure you get all the little bubbles out. Hope that helps.

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

Anonymous

  • 2336 Answers

SOURCE: bleeding front brakes

Bleed the master first, make sure that there is plenty of fluid going through there and all the air is out. Then, once the master is fully bled, the fluid will pull through the lines quickly. Just do one line at a time, and once you do them both and get good pressure you want to zip tie the lever to the bar overnight to make sure you get all the little bubbles out. Hope that helps.

Posted on Nov 10, 2008

Anonymous

  • 1 Answer

SOURCE: bleeding front brakes

To add some advice to anna14. Just use small slow strokes no more than a few milimeters and watch the air bubbles come to the surface with patience.You will feel the actuation point of the master cylinder piston through the lever. Also make sure you have removed any plastic cover out of the master cylinder reservoir.

Posted on Apr 02, 2009

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