Cars & Trucks - Popular Questions, Answers, Tips & Manuals


no pun intended........ You need specific tools,They are tough on some cars . Maybe a shop can do it for u.

Cars & Trucks | 5,735 views | 0 helpful votes


Certainly there is a connection between the brake and the cruise control as applying the footbrake would cancel or pause the cruise control. I am not sure about the speedo though.

Your description suggests there is something deeper going on due to the lurching and you should take the vehicle back to the repairer that replaced the booster and complain bitterly.

Cars & Trucks | 284 views | 2 helpful votes


You just need 12 volts from a charger to somewhere, red lead on the starter motor, negative to earth accessed from underneath. Also the cigarette lighter, or the dome light. Wait 15 minutes to get some charge in the battery.

Cars & Trucks | 297 views | 3 helpful votes


CALL YOUR DEALER

Cars & Trucks | 240 views | 1 helpful votes

Tip

Peugeot 308 SW (2008) LH & RH brake lights not working


Was told by a colleague at work following me in that my brake lights were not working. Both side brake lights didn't work but the high level brake light strip at top of rear hatch did. I checked the bulbs but made the mistake in thinking the top most bulbs were the rear lights then next ones down were the rear & brake - as both locations are same dual element bulbs. Based on some forums I thought it might be the brake switch. My mistake...hence this post. The brake & rear light bulbs are the top most bulbs in the clusters, the next bulbs down are the additional rear light only (as the brake element is unused as there is no contact strip in the cluster).

If the LH & RH brake lights don't work but the high level lights do - then it will be the cruel coincidence that both bulbs gone, and unlikely to be the brake switch (which is a dual switch with press to break press to break contacts).

The clue is if all the brake lights don't work, as in the LH & RH and the top strip high level lights then it is most likely the brake switch (which is located in the passenger side below the glove box behind a piece of trim that can be removed by taking out 3 studs. The switch has a green end and the rod of the switch is pushed by a rotating shaft connected to the brake pedal {plenty of info on youtube about this}. The brake switch is available from euro carparts at about £10.

Oh - the LH & RH light clusters locate in to the car's bodywork with 2 pins, and are held in with T30 (torx 30) bolts.

on May 07, 2020 | 2008 Peugeot 308 1.6

Tip

9 3 Convertible Driver door lock siezed, key wont turn



Driver door lock had been siezed for a year or so through lack of use after I had repaired the central locking. The moral of course, is that I should have used the key manually every now and then to keep the lock cylinder freed up.
I had an issue a while back trying to get into the car when the car battery died, so I decided to make sure that I didn't get caught out like that again.
I tried penetrating oil etc, but the lock was stuck fast and I didnt want to chance breaking my key.
The trunk lock on my other Saab (9-5) was also siezed, so as the lock on it is very easy to access, I had a go at trying to free it off.
Over 2 days, I left it soaking in diesel, drowned it in penetrating oil but it still wouldn't free off.
Taking a close look at the cylinder, I saw there's a small machined slot in the end of it (see picture). The slot is not connected to any linkage.
Rather than trying to force it using my key, I gave it a helping hand by using a screwdriver in the slot and working it gently but firmly back and forth. It worked a treat. A bit more penetrating oil and exercise and soon the lock worked like new.
Used brake cleaner to flush out the penetrating oil and blew it out with an air line. (A can of compressed air would do just as well).
Puffed in some proprietary graphite lock lube and exercised the lock to make sure the innards were properly lubed - Like wise, the outer cylinder, as that's where the problem originated. Refitted it to the 9-5 and turned my attention to the driver door lock on my 9-3.

Refer to the picture below before you start

Tools/ materials required: Nitrile gloves, Torx driver set, Small and large flat bladed screwdriver, trim removal tool, craft knife, penetrating oil, brake cleaner, can of compressed air or garage compressor, graphite powder lock lubricant, ruler, pencil, 2.5 mm and 9 mm drill, thin panel wire, masking tape and some plastic sheeting, touch-up paint, Fir tree type panel fixing clip suitable for 9 mm hole, small amount of sealer (Tiger seal or silicone), small torch, patience, beer and/or whisky.

First thing is that accessing the 9-3's door lock is a whole different ball game, whether it's to remove the cylinder or getting a screwdriver into the slot.
Very awkward tight space to work in, window glass / mechanism etc gets in the way of everything. Not impossible to do , but a right pig, especially with arthritis getting worse as I get older. So here's how I solved my problem....

- Mask off the area on the outer door directly below the lock to protect the paintwork when you start spraying penetrating oil
- Apply penetrating oil to the cylinder innards via key slot and especially to the gap that surrounds the lock barrel. Small amounts and often are better than drowning it. Leave it to do its thing and reapply as required. The longer it gets, the better it works. Clean any excess as you go. Wear good quality nitrile gloves (they also help avoid scratching when you start poking around inside the door panel)
- With the window closed (Up), fully open the door
- Prise off the outer plastic cover on the interior pull handle and remove 2 x Torx Screws
- Remove 3 x Torx screws along bottom edge of panel
- Prise off plastic cover in the centre of the metal door handle and remove 1 x Torx screw, then CAREFULLY remove the handle by pulling forwards and outwards - there's a small hook that attaches to a metal pull rod which runs through a couple of guide clips towards the door mounted lock mechanism. (Important to treat these clips gently as, if broken, the rod slips out of its guide and its effective length changes. As the interior metal handle has limited physical movement, this results in failure to physically operate the latching mechanism)
- Remove 2 x trim clips from the plastic trim on which the electric mirror switches are mounted (A dental pick is ideal to pop the centre pins). This part is optional if you have removed this trim before and you are confident and careful.
- Removing the panel from the door: Starting from the bottom, pull the panel outwards until you feel resistance. There are 2 trim clips on either vertical side, which are best popped using a trim tool or a wide bladed screwdiver padded at the end.
- With the fixings now removed, the panel can be taken off by pulling outwards and upwards over the door tab. Kinda rotational movement if you get what I mean.
- Carefully peel off the inner skin. Gentle heat with a hairdryer helps soften the adhesive, and a sharp craft knife comes in handy too.
- Use a small torch to see what's going on inside the panel. There are 2 short pull rods connecting the door latch mechanism to 1) The actual door handle and 2) The lock cylinder
- Identify the short pull rod connecting the lock cylinder. It's the one nearest the front of the car and it's the also the more accessible of the two.
- Disconnect this rod from the door latch mechanism. It's held in place by a small plastic rivet that is easily broken. The trick is to first rotate the rivet by 1/4 turn so that the rod disengages from the rivet and then will simply pull out from the rivet.
- As per the picture, you will see a small machined slot in the end of the lock cylinder. That's where you can insert a screwdriver to provide more leverage instead of forcing / snapping your key when trying to free off the siezed-up cylinder - IF you can get to it (which is where my arthritis kinda got in the way)

My solution: Drill an access hole directly in front of the slot. Detail as per the attached composite picture.
With the screwdriver in the slot, gently tap the end of the screwdriver using a small hammer to help initially break the built-up corrosion.
Turn the driver back and forth, little bit at a time. Apply more penetrating oil to the outer barrel as required when freeing the lock.

Cleanup now required....I used brake cleaner / compressed air as per above and then applied graphite lube.
- Reattached the pull rod, turned the rivet back in place to lock it
- Checked that the long horizontal pull rod attaching the inner door handle to the latch mechanism was correctly running through its guide clips
- Reattached the inner membrane and refitted the panel. The original adhesive was still good to re-use
Refitting the inner door handle correctly can be a bit tricky. I used an open-ended loop of thin panel wire threaded through the end of the pull rod to firstly pull the rod towards the front of the car (frontwards rather than outwards to avoid disengaging the pull rod from its guide clips). Slipped the handle back in the recess, making sure that the "tongue" of the handle was engaged in the loop at the end of the pull rod, and refitted its Torx screw.
I treated and plugged the newly drilled hole using a fir-tree panel clip as per the attached picture.
Job done....and it all happened because I had failed to use my key every now and then.

Normally, I'd now *** off to the village pub and smugly quaff a beer or three and a few drams in celebration, but with all this COVID lockdown thing putting the kybosh on that, I parked my **** on a garden chair and sat amazed at the fact that the soft top is actually down, courtesy of the uncharacteristically fine Scottish weather. With a bottle of malt at hand, of course...

PS: as regards COVID, I haven't yet come up with a solution to the problem of how to down a few drams while wearing a mask. So needless to say, I got pleasantly hammered in self-isolation.

PPS: I hope that this "short" guide will be of some use to someone, and that more importantly, everyone will take their hats off and raise their glasses in respect to the dedicated sacrifice that our health service workers are making in combating this vicious and indiscriminate pandemic. Slainte !!
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on May 03, 2020 | Saab 9 3 Cars & Trucks


Remove front cover on timing belt cover. Clean it. It could be the cam shaft seals leaking or crankshaft seal that could be damaged and throwing out oil.

Toyota Cars &... | 284 views | 2 helpful votes


Hi, 15nm,30nm,90 degrease,then another 90 degrease, start from middle to outer and tighten bolts clockwise, hope this was some help.

Cars & Trucks | 87 views | 1 helpful votes


Your best bet , take your vehicle to a qualified repair shop that has a professional scan tool an service repair info . So it can be diagnosed correctly . The Stop lamp switch is not a old school conventional type . Has three wires , five volt ref. voltage from the BCM ,
Stop Lamps
The brake pedal position sensor is used to sense the action of the driver application of the brake pedal. The brake pedal position sensor provides an analog voltage signal that will increase as the brake pedal is applied. The body control module (BCM) provides a low reference signal and a 5-volt reference voltage to the brake pedal position sensor. When the variable signal reaches a voltage threshold indicating the brakes have been applied, the BCM will apply battery positive voltage to the stop lamps, center high mounted stop lamp (CHMSL), transmission control module (TCM), and engine control module (ECM). Ground for the right rear stop lamp and CHMSL is applied at G402. Ground for the left rear stop lamp is applied at G400. The stop lamps on this vehicle will not illuminate unless the ignition is in the accessory, run, or crank positions. When the ignition is in the OFF position the stop lamps will not illuminate when the brake pedal is applied.

Checking for DTC's - diagnostic trouble code's in the BCM would be my first diagnostic step , not guessing an replacing parts .

DTC B3903 02: Stop Lamp Relay Circuit Short to Ground
DTC B3903 05: Stop Lamp Relay Circuit Open or Short to Voltage

DTC C0277 06: Brake Pedal Position Sensor Circuit Short to Ground or Open
DTC C0277 07 : Brake Pedal Position Sensor Circuit Voltage Above Threshold
DTC C0277 09 : Brake Pedal Position Sensor Circuit Rate of Change Above Threshold

DTC C0278 00: Brake Pedal Position Sensor Not Calibrated

DTC C0870 03 : Device Voltage Reference Output 1 Circuit Voltage Below Threshold
DTC C0870 07 : Device Voltage Reference Output 1 Circuit Voltage Above Threshold
As you can see a number of DTC'S can be set , so do yourself a favor an let a qualified technician check it

Circuit/System Description
The brake pedal position sensor is used to sense the action of the driver application of the brake pedal. The brake pedal position sensor provides an analog voltage signal that will increase as the brake pedal is applied. The body control module (BCM) provides a low reference signal and a 5-volt reference voltage to the brake pedal position sensor. When the variable signal reaches a voltage threshold indicating the brakes have been applied, the BCM will apply battery positive voltage to the stop lamps, center high mounted stop lamp (CHMSL), transmission control module (TCM), and engine control module (ECM). The stop lamps will not operate unless the ignition is in the ON position.

DTC P0572 : Brake Switch Circuit 1 Low Voltage
DTC P0573 : Brake Switch Circuit 1 High Voltage

It's hard to fix something when you don't have a clue how it works . The CC is also a controlled function of the BCM .
The BCM monitors the signal circuit of the cruise control switches. The BCM relays the cruise control switch status to the ECM via the GMLAN serial data circuit. The ECM uses the status of the cruise control switch to determine when to capture and maintain the vehicle speed. The ECM monitors the vehicle speed signal circuit in order to determine and the desired vehicle speed. The ECM uses the TAC motor in order to maintain the vehicle speed. For further review of the TAC system, refer to Throttle Actuator Control (TAC) System Description for the 2.0L engine or to Throttle Actuator Control (TAC) System Description for the 2.4L engine. Ignition voltage is supplied to the cruise control switch from the 2-amp CRUISE fuse located in the integrated BCM fuse block. The cruise control switches are located on the steering wheel. The cruise control function switches are arranged in a resistive ladder design, with each cruise control function switch having a different resistance value. The BCM detects a specific voltage value that is associated with any cruise control function switch being activated. When the normally open cruise control on/off switch is turned ON, the switch closes and the BCM detects a predetermined voltage signal on the cruise control set/coast and resume/accel switch signal circuit. The BCM sends a GMLAN serial data message to the ECM indicating that the On/Off switch is active. Similarly, when the + RES switch or the - SET switch are pressed, the BCM detects the predetermined voltage signal on the cruise control set/coast and resume/accel switch signal circuit. To engage the cruise control system, ensure that the vehicle speed is above 40.2 km/h (25 mph), turn the cruise On/Off switch ON and momentarily press the - SET switch. The ECM will engage the cruise control system and record the vehicle speed. The ECM sends a GMLAN serial data message via the BCM to the driver information center (DIC) in order to display the CRUISE ENGAGED message. The - SET switch or the + RES switch will remain inactive when the BCM has not received the predetermined voltage signal from the On/Off switch. Pressing the accelerator pedal, while the cruise control system is engaged, will allow the driver to override the cruise control system in order to accelerate the vehicle beyond the current set vehicle speed. When the accelerator pedal is released, the vehicle will decelerate and resume the current set vehicle speed. The driver can also override the current set vehicle speed via the - SET switch and the + RES switch. When the cruise control system is engaged, pressing and holding the - SET switch will allow the vehicle to decelerate from the current set vehicle speed without deactivating the cruise control system. When the - SET switch is released, the ECM will record the vehicle speed and maintain the vehicle speed as the new set vehicle speed. When the cruise control system is engaged, momentarily pressing the - SET switch will allow the vehicle to decelerate at 1.6 km/h (1 mph) increments for each time that the - SET is momentarily pressed, with a minimum vehicle speed of 37 km/h (23 mph). Pressing and holding the + RES switch, when the cruise control system is engaged, will allow the vehicle to accelerate to a greater vehicle speed than the current set vehicle speed. When the + RES switch is released, the ECM will record the vehicle speed and maintain the vehicle speed as the new set vehicle speed. When the cruise control system is engaged, momentarily pressing the + RES switch will allow the vehicle to accelerate at 1.6 km/h (1 mph) increments for each time that the + RES switch is momentarily pressed, with the maximum acceleration total of 16 km/h (10 mph) over the current set vehicle speed. Momentarily pressing the + RES switch after the cruise control system has been disengaged by pressing the brake pedal, will recall the previous set vehicle speed that is recorded in the ECM.

Saturn Cars &... | 263 views | 1 helpful votes


CHECK BACK WHEN THAT YEAR GETS HERE

Cars & Trucks | 116 views | 1 helpful votes


Make sure that the arm rests are in the up position and the headrest floded down. Check to be sure that there is not an obstruction in the folding compartment. Possible floor damage. Is the front seat in the most forward position?

Chrysler Cars &... | 74 views | 0 helpful votes


USUALLY IN THE TANK .

Nissan Cars &... | 84 views | 1 helpful votes

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