Question about 1993 Mazda Protege

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Throttle sensor How to install throttle sensor on 1993 1.8 portege

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Marvin

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It is located on the throttle body, it has a 3 wire connector, it is held on with tamper resistant screws, 2 of them.

Posted on Sep 05, 2008

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1993. What would cause the car to not accelerate but still remain running?


How to Test the 4.6L, 5.4L Ford Throttle Position Sensor

easyautodiagnostics.com > Ford > 4.6L, 5.4L
Dec 21, 2010 - Testing and troubleshooting the throttle position sensor (TPS) on your Ford ... No power as you accelerate the vehicle. ... Grand Marquis 4.6L,. 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004.

Aug 12, 2015 | Mercury Grand Marquis Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

1993 s10 codes 21 22 45


if its a ob1 than 21 is throttle position sensor error to high 22 is throttle body posistion sensor to low and 45 is o2 sensor error to rich hope this helps

Jun 26, 2012 | 1993 Chevrolet S-10

1 Answer

1993 chevy lumina-tps


"TPS" stands for Throttle Position Sensor. It is located in the same place that all TPS sensors are located - on the throttle body.

Apr 14, 2012 | 1993 Chevrolet Lumina APV

1 Answer

Where is the throttle positions sensor located


The Throttle Position Sensor, or TPS is connected to the throttle shaft on the throttle body.

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Fig. 2: Disengage the Throttle Position Sensor (TPS) wiring harness connector

According with the Grand Cherokee Repair Manual, check this removal & installation procedure...
(see Figures 5 and 6)
  1. Remove the air intake tube at the throttle body.
  2. Disengage the TPS wiring connector and remove the two mounting screws.
  3. Carefully remove the TPS from the throttle body.
To install:
  1. The throttle shaft end has a tang that can be fitted into the TPS two different ways. Only one of the installed positions is correct. When correctly positioned, the TPS can be rotated a few degrees. To determine correct positioning, place the TPS onto the throttle body with the throttle shaft tang on one side of the TPS socket. Verify that the TPS can be rotated. If the TPS cannot be rotated, place the TPS on the throttle body with the throttle shaft tang on the other side.
  2. Tighten the two TPS mounting bolts to 60 inch lbs. (7 Nm) and engage the wiring connector.
  3. Manually operate the throttle and check for any binding.
  4. Install the air intake tube.
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Fig. 5: Remove the throttle position sensor retainers...

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Fig. 6: ...then, remove the throttle position sensor

Additionally, its possible that you are interesting in some section about this repair manual: Jeep Grand Cherokee 1993-1998 (ZJ Series).

Hope this helps; just keep in mind that your feedback is important and I'll appreciate your time and consideration if you leave some testimonial comment. Thank you for using FixYa.

Jose.

Oct 20, 2011 | 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee

1 Answer

Where s the throttle sensor located on 1993 gmc sonoma


The TPS (Throttle Position Sensor) is located out on the engine, on the side of the throttle body. Here is what it looks like.


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Jun 05, 2010 | 1993 GMC Sonoma Club

2 Answers

Throttle position switch. how much for the part? is it easy to repllace?


This sensor sends the ECU an output signal which corresponds to the opening of the throttle valve. Using this output signal, the ECU precisely controls the air/fuel ratio during acceleration, deceleration and idling. The TP sensor and the throttle switch are combined as part of an assembly. The switch signal turns ON only when the throttle is opened to the idle position or at Wide Open Throttle (WOT) acceleration.

REMOVAL & INSTALLATION
( see Figures 2, 3, 4 and 5 )


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Fig. 2: Disconnect the wire harness from the throttle position sensor-Legacy

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Fig. 3: Paint a matchmark on the sensor and throttle body for ease of installation and adjustment

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Fig. 4: Remove the sensor retainer screws

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Fig. 5: Lift off the throttle position sensor
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Disconnect the throttle sensor electrical harness.
  3. Place a matchmark on the throttle position sensor and throttle body mounting surface, so that during installation, the sensor can be properly aligned.
  4. Remove the 2 screws securing the throttle sensor to the throttle body assembly.
  5. Remove the throttle sensor by pulling it in the axial direction of the throttle shaft.
  6. Remove the throttle sensor O-ring and discard.
To install:
  1. Using a new throttle O-ring, install the throttle sensor, aligning the matchmarks. Install and hand-tighten the retainer screw.
  2. Connect the throttle sensor electrical harness.
  3. Connect the negative battery cable.

Hope this help (remember rated and comment this). Good luck.

Mar 19, 2010 | 1993 Subaru Legacy

1 Answer

My 1993 jeep 4.0 runs bad when it gets warmed up


It is either your throttle positioning sensor (most likely) or your pre-cat o-2 sensor. But most likely your throttle body which only costs like 50-60 dollars i think.

Apr 11, 2009 | 1993 Jeep Cherokee Country

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