Question about 1994 Ford Thunderbird

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1994 ford thunderbird 3.8 oil pan inframe removal

I need to check the rod and main bearings and want to this and change them in frame. Can this be done or do I have to pull the engine?
Thanks,
christopher

Posted by cphark on

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PULL IT...front support cross member blocks it. Engine is an easy pull. Having oil pressure problems? Mine first went out with oil pressure dropping at idle and red lights, speed up and it would be ok until the rod knocking. Then it was time to remove and have crank checked and polished or reground. Might as well overhaul engine at this point of it being out.

Posted on Aug 26, 2008

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I have a 2001 cadilac deville that has a wicked knock in the engine. it is a rod knock (from the sound) so i figure my options are to change the engine, or change the rod ect. I wanna know if the engine...


Thats going to be a tricky pull. you can actually do BOTH methods fro pulling that motor. Which ever is easier for you would be better.

As far as the rod knock. Rod knock simply means that the rod bearing has spun and is no longer a smooth surface. potentially, you could pull the motor and replace just that rod and bearing if the crankshaft was unaffected. the majority of the time, more work needs to be done. I think in this case, it may be cheaper to remove the motor and replace the crank and bearings. A replacement used motor will probably run about 1k if you can find one at a yard.

Apr 07, 2014 | 2001 Cadillac DeVille

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1995 jeep yj 4 cyl manual tran, motor noise, taping, when oil is hot.Changed lifters, still noise, 200.000 km on motor


Two items that are important here.....Did you check the rocker arms for wear and did you check the camshaft to make sure the lobes aren't worn? Also, even a new lifter will not function correctly if the oil pressure in the engine is low. An engine with 200k on it likely has some bearing wear. The oil pump can also wear but generally it won't wear enough to lower the pressure enough to cause lifter noise. If everything in the valvetrain checks out as good, I'd be looking at the bearings. If some are worn (check with plastigage, available at parts stores) replace them and also the pump.
Most times, the rod bearings wear faster than do the mains. You can do rod bearings in the car. If mains are worn, best to do a complete rebuild as cam bearings are likely close behind, and mains should be done out of the car anyhow. (doubt if you will need to go that far though).

Jun 10, 2011 | Jeep Wrangler Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I have a 2002 ford escape with a knock in the bottom end, sounds like a hollow knock, main or rod I don't know but I want to change all the bearings. Do I have to pull the engine or can I do it from...


you need to pull the engine. and a bearing will not cause a knock. if it is a base engine knock you probably have a broken push rod, but it is always good to make sure its not just your catalytic converters knocking

Mar 30, 2011 | Ford Escape Cars & Trucks

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2002 Wrangler Sport. 4.0 My oil pressure gauge hit rock bottom, the engine made soon clanking sounds and died. I pulled the valve cover but dont see any bent rods. What else should I be looking for...


The main bearings and connecting rod bearings. The cam bearings. The wrist pins. These are the first bearings that get oil from the oil pump. When you take the oil pan off to replace the pump pull one of the rod caps and check for scaring and color change.

Feb 15, 2011 | 2002 Jeep Wrangler

1 Answer

Replacing crankshaft pulley/balancer assy procedure. 1994 Merc Topaz 2.3 4cyl.


Crankshaft and Main Bearings REMOVAL & INSTALLATION NOTE: When draining coolant, keep in mind that cats and dogs are attracted by the ethylene glycol antifreeze, and are quite likely to drink any that is left in an uncovered container or in puddles on the ground. This will prove fatal in sufficient quantity. Always drain the coolant into a sealable container. Coolant should be reused unless it is contaminated or several years old. CAUTION
The EPA warns that prolonged contact with used engine oil may cause a number of skin disorders, including cancer! You should make every effort to minimize your exposure to used engine oil. Protective gloves should be worn when changing the oil. Wash your and and any other exposed skin areas as soon as possible after exposure to used engine oil. Soap and water, or waterless hand cleaner should be used. 2.3L Engine
  1. Disconnect the negative battery cable.
  2. Drain the cooling system and engine crankcase.
  3. Remove the engine from the vehicle.
  4. Remove the crankshaft front pulley, front cover, timing chain and sprockets, cylinder head, oil pan, oil pump and intermediate driveshaft.
  5. Remove the rear oil seal cover bolts and remove the cover.
  6. Remove the piston assemblies. NOTE: Mark the connecting rods and bearing caps so they can be installed in the proper cylinders.
  7. Remove the main bearing caps and bearing.
  8. Carefully lift the crankshaft out of the crankcase, so No. 3 thrust bearing surfaces are not damaged.
  9. Remove the main bearing inserts from the engine block and bearing caps. NOTE: For cleaning purposes, the oil gallery and coolant drain plugs can be removed. To install:
  10. Wash the cylinder block thoroughly to remove all foreign material and dry before assembling other components. Check to ensure all oil holes are fully open and clean. Check to ensure the bearing inserts and bearing bores are clean. Clean the mating surfaces of the crankcase and each main bearing cap.
  11. Install the main bearings in the cylinder block. Note that the center front bearing is a thrust bearing and the front upper bearing has a small "V'' notch on the parting line face.
  12. Lubricate the bearings with clean engine oil.
  13. Carefully lower the crankshaft into place. Be careful not to damage the bearing surfaces.
  14. Check the clearance of each main bearing as outlined in this section.
  15. After the bearing has been fitted, apply a light coat of engine oil to the journal and bearings. Install the bearing cap in their original locations . (refer to numbers on caps). The caps must be installed with the arrows pointing to ward the front of the engine. Oil the bolts and tighten to specifications. Repeat the procedure for the remaining bearings. NOTE: Turn the crankshaft to check for turning torque. The turning torque should not exceed 4.5 ft. lbs. (6 Nm).
  16. Install the pistons and connecting rod caps. Check clearance of each bearing, as out lined in this section.
  17. After the connecting rod bearings have been fitted, apply a light coat of engine oil to the journal and bearings.
  18. Turn the crankshaft throw to the bottom of its stroke. Pull the piston all the way down until the rod bearing seats on the crankshaft journal. NOTE: Guide the rod to prevent crankshaft journal and oil cooling jet damage.
  19. Install the connecting rod cap. Align the marks on the rods with the marks on the cap, and tighten the nut.
  20. After the piston and connecting rod assemblies have been installed, check the side clearance between the connecting rods on each connecting rod crankshaft journal.
  21. Install the rear crankshaft seal and cover. Tighten the bolts to 5–7 ft. lbs. (7–10 Nm).
  22. Installation of the remaining components is in the reverse order of removal.

Jul 26, 2010 | 1994 Mercury Topaz

2 Answers

I have a 2002 ram 1500 with 4.7 magnum truck


There are several reasons why you would hear a loud knock from the engine, and the knock will usually be either in the top end or in the lower or bottom end of the engine.

The first thing that should be done is to drain the engine oil, and then pour the oil filter into a pan where you can see it, and if there is a lot of metal flakes, or a fine cloud of brass floating in the engine oil, you will not want to waste the time or the money trying to repair that engine by dropping the oil pan and replacing the piston rod bearings, it will only be a very temporary patch at best, that is if the patch even lasts for a day.

If you do find metal flakes in the engine oil and oil filter, the piston rod bearings will not be the only bearings in the engine that will need to be replaced, and the crankshaft main bearings can only be replaced by removing the engine and placing it upside-down on a good engine stand. The biggest problem would be that even if you did successfully replace the piston rod and crankshaft main bearings, it would only take one piece of metal flake that was left over in the engine block to find its way to one of your new bearings and then it will take no time at all before that engine will be right back where you started, and that is how important just the cleaning process is in repairing or replacing internal engine components.

If you do not find any metal in the engine oil or oil filter, then you should attempt to find the actual cause of the knock before you decide how to repair the engine, and you will have to remove the engine oil pan to inspect the rod bearings, and if you do remove the engine oil pan make sure that when you inspect the rod bearings that you only do so one at a time because you can not mix up the rod caps, and be very sure that when you remove a rod cap that you do replace it the same way that it came off, and if you turn around the rod cap and install it the wrong way or scratch the crankshaft bearing surface the rod bearing will fail.

If you can hear the knocking louder from under the vehicle then the most likely causes for a lower end engine knock are a damaged piston, worn out piston rod bearings, a broken piston rod, a broken flex-plate, and sometimes loose torque converter to flex-plate bolts, and the only parts that you can really check out without opening up the engine would be a broken flex-plate, or for any loose torque converter to flex-plate bolts.

If you can hear the knocking more from the top of the engine, then the most likely causes for an upper engine knock would be a faulty lifter, or broken rocker arm, or a broken valve spring allowing the valve to contact the piston, and it will require the removal of the valve covers and possibly the intake manifold to inspect for the problem.

If you have any doubts then it would be a good idea to consider a good used engine that you can hear run before you buy it, or a rebuilt engine for that vehicle.

I hope that this information will help you out and save you some time and a lot of money.

Jun 07, 2010 | 2001 Dodge Ram 1500 Truck 2WD

1 Answer

I HAVE A MK2 MR2 WITH A BIG END BEARING NOISE,I HAVE BEEN TOLD ITS A SIMPLE REPAIR, AND CAN BE DONE WITHOUT INVOLVING ENGINE REMOVAL, CAN ANYONE CONFIRM?


Yes and no... The most common problem in the bottom end is with cylinder number 1. It gets oil starved. This is in the 3sgte. Not sure what motor you have. You can change the bearing without taking out the engine....But you will have to drop the sub frame and oil pan. Problem is, is that you dont know if the crank needs reground and or resized. Or if the rod is bad and ovaled. The bearings wont fit.... you can replace the bad bearings.YES! But how long will it last since it wasnt done correctly? Best case. If there is no damage to the crank and rod? Sure it can last a long time with the rite size bearings. But chances are the rod is bad, the crank needs reground/ or its bent it will need machined. good luck

Dec 27, 2009 | 1991 Toyota MR2

1 Answer

Jeep cherokee with a 4.0 6 cyl when a start the motor cold it sounds like a diesel engine, lots of clanking. last a couple of seconds then goes away. replaced oil pump. no help there.


Lots of clanking when first started sounds like a worn rod bearing. Check the engine compartment and rev engine to listen for knocking. It will get progressively worse as time goes by. Nothing to do except buy/install new crankshaft kit from autozone, about $300+.

In the mean time, just change oil and put in some oil additive to lessen the knocking. High speeds will accelerate the wear of the rod bearing. The rod bearing is installed inside of the piston rod. This bearing goes around the crankshaft. It has very tight tolerances down to the thousands of an inch. When it gets worn, metal will flake off of the soft bearing material and contaminate your oil more. If you catch it early enough, you can replace the bearing without too much trouble. Here is what you need to do.

Find the bad bearing. If you hear the knocking with the engine on and under the hood, disconnect a sparkplug. If the knocking goes away, that is the bad bearing. Do this disconnecting/reconnecting until you identify the bad bearings. Now disconnect battery. Next loosen drive belt- done from steering pump. Loosen 2-13mm bolts on back, one on top and one on bracket on bottom. On bottom right-hand side of pump will be a long adjusting bolt. Loosen turn this bolt counter clockwise to loosen drive belt. Now jack vehicle from the frame, vehicle will raise but tires will remain on ground. keep going as high as your jack will go. Install jack stands on frame. This extends your suspension and keep body raised. Drain oil, remove steering damper. It's the shock absorber looking thing connected to your tie rods/center link. The easiest way to remove the oil pan is to get a 3/8 inch socket adapter for a cordless drill. The bolts will come out in a hurry if you do this. Keep track of where the double sided bolts are, they secure the fuel line brackets. After all are removed, wiggle, tug, and pull pan out. Now you will see the large main caps and the rod caps. The mains are bolted to the block and the rods will rotate up and down with the spinning of the crankshaft. Spin the crankshaft to see. Each bearing cap needs to be marked. Use a center punch and hammer to mark from front to rear. 1 mark for rod cap 1 and so forth. You should end up with 6 marks on rod cap #6. Do the marking on the front side of the cap so you know how it fits back. Remove the rod caps that corresponded to the bad bearing identified earlier. Remove nut on cap. Wiggle cap back and forth until it comes loose. It will eventually come out. Inside the cap, you will see the bearing. It is basically a liner for the cap that rides on the crankshaft. there is one on the top of the rod too. Remove it by pushing rod up into cylinder and pulling it out with your hand. Ensure you remember the orientation of the bearings. One side has a notch, the other has a key that fits into a hole on the rod. Now you have the bearing in hand, check for scoring, or wearing on the face. Check the web for a nice color picture. Feel the crankshaft bearing area with your finger nail. It should be smooth and not ridged. Purchase some plastigage along with a standard .000 bearing. Clean rod surface, install new bearing and plastigage. Tighten to torque. Remove cap and measure plastigage for your oil clearance. Now you can purchase the correct bearing to match your oil clearance. If you don't have a repair manual, now's a good time to get it. It has bearing tolerances for you to get the correct bearing. After you have the correct bearings, use oil additive to grease up the new bearing/crank surfaces. Put everything back together, put some quality magnets inside of your oil pan near the drain hole and cross your fingers.

Nov 20, 2008 | Jeep Cherokee Cars & Trucks

3 Answers

Crank - Piston Rod Bearing Replacement - Queston


You will have to have the crankshaft machined if the rod bearing is the cause of the noise, so you will have to pull the engine, if u don't do the crank the bearing will fail in a few miles.

Oct 02, 2008 | 1999 Isuzu Rodeo

1 Answer

Changing rod bearings


Yes you will have to raise engine to pull pan, but more importantly is why do you need to change rod bearings? If they need replacing you will probably have to change the mains as well as rings and so on. If you have run it knocking, you could have damaged the crankshaft and new bearings won't stay. Suggest you check a little deeper before going to all this expense.

Aug 02, 2008 | 2000 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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