Question about 2008 Dodge Durango

4 Answers

I replaced caliper on 2008 dodge durango and bled calipar no more air was coming out of bleeder but i still cant get a firm brake pedal please help

Posted by cjbolelli on

Ad

4 Answers

yoursuneekly

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 20 times.

    New Friend:

    An expert that has 1 follower.

  • Expert
  • 71 Answers

Did you bleed just at the calipar? You may have more places to bleed going back to the master? How did you do the bleeding? If you just let it open and run, this may not have been enough. To bleed a break line without a bleeder tool, you need to open the bleeder at the caliper , depress the break peddle slowly untill it reaches the floor-hold it there- close the bleeder on the caliper then release the break peddle. repeat this until no air comes out for 3 tries.

Posted on Nov 27, 2010

Ad

Anonymous

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    New Friend:

    An expert that has 1 follower.

    Hot-Shot:

    An expert who has answered 20 questions.

  • Expert
  • 77 Answers

Was the bleeder screw at the top of the caliper cause if they gave ya one for the wrong side and the bleeders at the bottom of the caliper you ll never get the air out of it

Posted on Nov 27, 2010

Ad

Anonymous

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    New Friend:

    An expert that has 1 follower.

    Corporal:

    An expert that has over 10 points.

    Mayor:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 2 times.

  • Contributor
  • 17 Answers

You may have to bleed entire system.start with RR then LF then LR then RF

Posted on Nov 27, 2010

Anonymous

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    New Friend:

    An expert that has 1 follower.

  • Contributor
  • 2 Answers

Try opening right & left bleeder valve and let it bleed itself keep resavor full

Posted on Nov 27, 2010

Add Your Answer

×

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

1 Answer

Rear caliper on 2005 Ford F150 not releasing, replaced both rear calipers, now pedal goes to the floor - no brakes at all. What can/should i do?


Sounds like it still has some air in the system or a bad master cylinder. First try bleeding all air, there is definitely some air left in the lines and this is most probably causing the problem. Bled the lines at the bleeder screws on the calipers. ---------- There is air left in the brake line.Any time the brake system is opened to replace brake lines, caliper, pads etc etc.Mostly the air enters the system, and that air has to be completely bleed.Otherwise the same symptoms , what you are getting will be noticed.-------- Brakes can be bled manually, with a power bleeder, injector tool or vacuum bleeder.IIt does not make any difference which method you use as long as all the lines and components are flushed with enough fluid to remove any trapped air bubbles or air pockets.----
The most common bleeding procedure is to bleed the brake furthest from the master cylinder first, then bleed the other brake that shares the same hydraulic circuit (which may be the other rear brake on a rear-wheel drive car or truck, or the opposite front brake on a front-wheel drive car or minivan). After these have been bled, you then bleed the other brake circuit starting with the furthest brake from the master cylinder.--------- When the complete air is bleed from the line, the brake should be firm when car is on.In your case brake brake pedal is loose and goes almost to the floor when car is ON.This is due to Air in the line.Get the complete air bleed from brake line.------- This will help.Thanks.Helpmech

Sep 07, 2011 | 1998 Ford F150 Regular Cab

1 Answer

Need to know procedure for bleeding brakes on1987 gmc s15 2.8 litre 4x4 front disc w/abs


MANUAL BLEEDING

For those of us who are not fortunate enough to have access to a power bleeding tool, the manual brake bleeding procedure will quite adequately remove air from the hydraulic system. The major difference between the pressure and manual bleeding procedures is that the manual method takes more time and will require help from an assistant. One person must depress the brake pedal, while another opens and closes the bleeder screws.

In addition to a length of clear neoprene bleeder hose, bleeder wrenches and a clear bleeder bottle (old plastic jar or drink bottle will suffice), bleeding late-model ABS systems may also require the use of one or more relatively inexpensive combination valve pressure bleeding tools (which are used to depress one or more valves in order to allow component/system bleeding). To fully bleed the late model ABS systems, a scan tool should also be used to run the system through functional tests.
  1. Clean the top of the master cylinder, remove the cover and fill the reservoirs with clean fluid. To prevent squirting fluid, and possibly damaging painted surfaces, install the cover during the procedure, but be sure to frequently check and top off the reservoirs with fresh fluid.
CAUTION Never reuse brake fluid which has been bled from the system.
  1. The master cylinder must be bled first if it is suspected to contain air. If the master cylinder was removed and bench bled before installation it must still be bled, but it should take less time and effort. Bleed the master cylinder as follows:
    1. Position a container under the master cylinder to catch the brake fluid.
WARNING Do not allow brake fluid to spill on or come in contact with the vehicle's finish as it will remove the paint. In case of a spill, immediately flush the area with water.
    1. Loosen the front brake line at the master cylinder and allow the fluid to flow from the front port.
    2. Have a friend depress the brake pedal slowly and hold (air and/or fluid should be expelled from the loose fitting). Tighten the line, then release the brake pedal and wait 15 seconds. Loosen the fitting and repeat until all air is removed from the master cylinder bore.
    3. When finished, tighten the line fitting to 20 ft. lbs. (5 Nm).
    4. Repeat the sequence at the master cylinder rear pipe fitting.
During the bleeding procedure, make sure your assistant does NOT release the brake pedal while a fitting is loosened or while a bleeder screw is opening. Air will be drawn back into the system.
  1. Check and refill the master cylinder reservoir.
Remember, if the reservoir is allowed to empty of fluid during the procedure, air will be drawn into the system and the bleeding procedure must be restarted at the master cylinder assembly.
  1. On late model ABS equipped vehicles, perform the special ABS procedures as described later in this section. On 4 wheel ABS systems the Brake Pressure Modulator Valve (BPMV) must be bled (if it has been replaced or if it is suspected to contain air) and on most Rear Wheel Anti-Lock (RWAL) systems the combination valve must be held open. In both cases, special combination valve depressor tools should be used during bleeding and a scan tool must be used for ABS function tests.
  1. If a single line or fitting was the only hydraulic line disconnected, then only the caliper(s) or wheel cylinder(s) affected by that line must be bled. If the master cylinder required bleeding, then all calipers and wheel cylinders must be bled in the proper sequence:
    1. Right rear
    2. Left rear
    3. Right front
    4. Left front
  2. Bleed the individual calipers or wheel cylinders as follows:
    1. Place a suitable wrench over the bleeder screw and attach a clear plastic hose over the screw end. Be sure the hose is seated snugly on the screw or you may be squirted with brake fluid.
Be very careful when bleeding wheel cylinders and brake calipers. The bleeder screws often rust in position and may easily break off if forced. Installing a new bleeder screw will often require removal of the component and may include overhaul or replacement of the wheel cylinder/caliper. To help prevent the possibility of breaking a bleeder screw, spray it with some penetrating oil before attempting to loosen it.
    1. Submerge the other end of the tube in a transparent container of clean brake fluid.
    2. Loosen the bleed screw, then have a friend apply the brake pedal slowly and hold. Tighten the bleed screw to 62 inch lbs. (7 Nm), release the brake pedal and wait 15 seconds. Repeat the sequence (including the 15 second pause) until all air is expelled from the caliper or cylinder.
    3. Tighten the bleeder screw to 62 inch lbs. (7 Nm) when finished.
  1. Check the pedal for a hard feeling with the engine not running. If the pedal is soft, repeat the bleeding procedure until a firm pedal is obtained.
  2. If the brake warning light is on, depress the brake pedal firmly. If there is no air in the system, the light will go out.
  3. After bleeding, make sure that a firm pedal is achieved before attempting to move the vehicle.

Hope helps (remember to rate this answer).

Apr 13, 2011 | 1987 GMC Jimmy

2 Answers

I HAVE A 1996 SATURN SL 1 I HAVE NO BRAKE PEDAL SO REPLACED MASTER CYLINDER 2 TIMES GET FLUID BLEED OUT WITH CAR NOT RUNNING HAVE GOOD PEDAL GO TO START CAR LOSE ALL PEDAL HAVE NO BRAKES FLUIDNOT COMING...


MASTER CYLINDER SHOULD BE BENCH BLED BEFORE INSTALATION.PUT MASTER CYL. IN VISE-SHOULD HAVE COME W/RUBBER TUBES & ADAPTERS TO CURCULATE FLUID FULL STROKE OF CYL. TILL ALL AIR BUBBLES ARE GONE.THEN INSTALL MSTR CYL./GETT SOMEONE TO PUMP BRAKES THEN HOLD PEDAL FIRMLY WHILE YOU RELEASE BLEEDER VALVES ONE AT THE TIME FARTHEREST FROM THE MSTR CYL. TILL ALL AIR IS PURGED. REPEAT STEPS TO EACH BLEEDER TILL ALL HAVE BEEN DONE.GOOD LUCK W/THAT!

Mar 30, 2011 | 1996 Saturn SL

1 Answer

I replaced the whole back break line,as i try to bleed them i get fluid out of the front passenger side and the back driver side,but nothing out of the other two.whats the problem?


Hi, your proportioning valve is stuck. Take the caps off and recenter the one stuck valve. Then rebleed the system using the procedure below. Thanks for using fixya.

jturcotte_1047.gif
For those of us who are not fortunate enough to have access to a power bleeding tool, the manual brake bleeding procedure will quite adequately remove air from the hydraulic system. The major difference between the pressure and manual bleeding procedures is that the manual method takes more time and will require help from an assistant. One person must depress the brake pedal, while another opens and closes the bleeder screws.
  1. Deplete the vacuum reserve by applying the brakes several times with the ignition OFF .
  2. Clean the top of the master cylinder, remove the cover and fill the reservoirs with clean fluid.
  3. The master cylinder must be bled first if it is suspected to contain air. If the master cylinder was removed and bench bled before installation it must still be bled, but it should take less time and effort. Bleed the master cylinder as follows:
    1. Position a container under the master cylinder to catch the brake fluid.
    2. Loosen the front brake line(s) at the master cylinder and allow the fluid to flow from the front port.




WARNING Do not allow brake fluid to spill on or come in contact with the vehicle's finish as it will remove the paint. In case of a spill, immediately flush the area with water.

  1. Tighten the line connection(s).
  2. Have an assistant depress and hold the brake pedal.
  3. Loosen the line connection(s) again, allowing air to escape from the master cylinder.
  4. Tighten the line(s), then have the assistant release the brake pedal and wait for 15 seconds.
  5. Repeat steps D through F until the line(s) are free of air.
  6. When finished bleeding the air from the master cylinder, tighten the line connections to 20 ft. lbs. (27 Nm).
  7. Repeat steps B through H, only with the master cylinder rear pipe fitting(s).

  1. Refill the master cylinder with fresh brake fluid.



WARNING Never reuse brake fluid that has been bled from the system.

  1. If a single line or fitting was the only hydraulic line disconnected, then only the caliper(s) or wheel cylinder(s) affected by that line must be bled. If the master cylinder required bleeding, then all calipers and wheel cylinders must be bled in the proper sequence:
    1. Right rear
    2. Left rear
    3. Right front
    4. Left front

  2. Bleed the individual calipers or wheel cylinders as follows:
    1. Place a suitable wrench over the bleeder screw and attach a clear plastic hose over the screw end. Be sure the hose is seated snugly on the screw or you may be squirted with brake fluid.
    2. Submerge the other end of the tube in a transparent container of clean brake fluid.
    3. With the help of an assistant, apply the brake pedal slowly and hold.


During the bleeding procedure, make sure your assistant does NOT release the brake pedal while a fitting is loosened or while a bleeder screw is opening. Air will be drawn back into the system.
  1. While the assistant continues to apply pressure to the brake pedal, loosen the bleeder screw, and watch for air bubbles in the container.

Be very careful when loosening the wheel cylinder and brake caliper bleeding screws. The bleeder screws often rust in position and may easily break off if forced. To help prevent the possibility of breaking a bleeder screw, spray it with some penetrating oil before attempting to loosen it. Installing a new bleeder screw will often require removal of the component and may include overhaul or replacement of the wheel cylinder/caliper.
  1. Tighten the bleeder screw.
  2. Instruct the assistant to release the brake pedal.
  3. Wait approximately 15 seconds, and instruct the assistant to depress the brake pedal again.

Remember, if the reservoir is allowed to empty of fluid during the procedure, air will be drawn into the system and the bleeding procedure must be restarted at the master cylinder assembly.
  1. Repeat steps C through F until there are no air bubbles present in the container.

  1. Check the pedal for a hard feeling with the engine not running. If the pedal is soft, repeat the bleeding procedure until a firm pedal is obtained.
  2. If the brake warning light is on, depress the brake pedal firmly. If there is no air in the system, the light will go out.
  3. Once all the air is bled from the system, install the bleeder screw caps.
  4. After bleeding, make sure that a firm pedal is achieved before attempting to move the vehicle.

Feb 14, 2011 | 1994 Pontiac Grand Am

1 Answer

Need to know how to get the air out of the brake lines.


You will need to bleed the brakes. The easiest way to do this is to have a second person if you don't have a power bleeder.
You should have the vehicle on a level surface, then starting at the farthest wheel from the master cylinder (right rear) have your helper pump the brakes several times until the pedal is firm. Then have your helper keep constant pressure on the brake pedal while you loosen the bleeder (a small nut with a hole in it located towards the top of the brake backing plate on the rear). If this vehicle has 4 wheel disc brakes the bleeder will be located at the top or highest portion of the caliper. You should check that you have a full master cylinder of Dot 3 brake fluid and make sure the cap is on securely after you have bled each wheel. Running the master cylinder out of fluid will only cause you to have more bleeding.Only crack the bleeder open far enough till you see, feel or hear air come out but make sure to tighten it before you helper reports the pedal is on the floor.
You will need to be quick. Repeat this on this wheel till you get a solid stream of brake fluid coming out. Then move to the left rear and repeat.
Once done on the rear you will need to remove the tires from the front to have access to the bleeders on the caliper.Again starting on the left front repeat the procedure then move to the right front.
By the time you are finished your pedal should be firm and towards the top. If its not you may need to replace the brake pads and shoes and have the rotors turn or replaced. If you have rear drum brakes you should make sure these are properly adjusted up also. This too can cause a spongy pedal.

Aug 07, 2010 | 2002 Chevrolet Tracker

1 Answer

We have bled the brakes at least 4 times and they are still spongy. It is a 1938 ford with a frame mounted master cylinder and discs front and back. GM Calipers on Front, Speedway Ford on Rear. Used a...


If no fluid is "leaking" from the brake lines (inspect visually) then the brakes should be bled with this method: Use 1/8 inch 2 foot long hose from parts store and attach the hose from bleeder valve ball on the brake caliper to a bottle partially filled with brake fluid. The end of the hose in the bottle must be submerged in some clean brake fluid in the bottle. With a second person holding the brake pedal to the floor, slowly turn bleeder valve counter clockwise (loosen tiny bit) with wrench and watch for dirty brake fluid to create bubbles in the bottle. When bubbles start, quickly tighten bleeder valve back to tight. Second person should lift foot, pump and then while valve is still tight should push the pedal to the floor again and THEN you again open bleeder valve slowly turning counter clockwise and watch for bubbles. Repeat until no more bubbles can be created in the bottle where the hose is submerged. Move to next caliper and repeat. For a firm brake pedal you will need to repeat this on all four calipers.

Jul 25, 2010 | 1995 Chevrolet Blazer

1 Answer

Changed brake pads on my 94 dodge stealth and now i can't get the brakes bled


If you have a soft brake pedal and have to push hard to slow down or pump the brakes to slow down then you probably have air in the brake lines from the last brake pad replacement. The brakes need to be bled with this method: Use 1/8 inch 2 foot long hose from parts store and attach the hose from bleeder valve ball on the brake caliper to a bottle partially filled with brake fluid. The end of the hose in the bottle must be submerged in the fluid in the bottle. With a second person holding the brake pedal to the floor, slowly turn bleeder valve counter clockwise (loosen tiny bit) with wrench and watch for dirty brake fluid to create bubbles in the bottle. When bubbles start, quickly tighten bleeder valve back to tight. Second person should lift foot, pump and then while valve is still tight should push the pedal to the floor again and THEN you again open bleeder valve slowly turning counter clockwise and watch for bubbles. Repeat until no more bubbles can be created in the bottle where the hose is submerged. Move to next caliper and repeat. For a firm brake pedal you will need to repeat this on all four calipers.

Jul 24, 2010 | 1994 Dodge Stealth

2 Answers

I have a 92 chrsy. 5th ave with no antilock brakes. just base brakes with rear drums. replaced master cly. due to leaking and replaced all the brake lines and hoses. i have good streams of fluid from all 4...


When you bleed the brakes are you starting with brake furthest from the master cylinder? Also was the master cylinder bench bled? If everything there is okay and you are not getting any air in fluid stream, you could try bleeding the brakes by having some one slowly pump the pedal till it is firm. Then have them let off open first bleeder valve and slowly depress to floor and hold there untol the valve is closed. repeat this at all bleeders. You may want to have car running to do this. Try this and let me know.

Jul 02, 2009 | Chrysler New Yorker Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Bleeding abs brakes


Try using a pressure bleeder. It will force the air out. Works every time.

Nov 08, 2008 | 2001 Ford Mustang

Not finding what you are looking for?
Cars & Trucks Logo

173 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Dodge Experts

Marvin
Marvin

Level 3 Expert

85239 Answers

Thomas Perkins
Thomas Perkins

Level 3 Expert

14852 Answers

Mike

Level 3 Expert

4372 Answers

Are you a Dodge Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...