Question about 2004 Mercury Mountaineer

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2004 Mountaineer no start no crank? Battery, starter, fuses, relays all good. No code errors. PATS problem. Original keys&fobs all good even reset manually and good. All dash lights functions ok.

Mileage shows so doesn't appeAr PCM issue. Can it be PATS transceiver if I was able to manually reset keys&fobs by turning keys on off 8 times etc. Even though that worked, PATS went back to quick flashing and no start no crank.

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Jeff Armer

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. quick flashing when ? when trying to start the vehicle ? If yes you need to have it checked for codes . Do you know what DTC'S - diagnostic trouble codes are . If that light is flashing while trying to start the vehicle codes are present in the module that controls PATS . Instead of guessing have towed to a qualified repair shop . Because you have no idea how to diagnose this system .

Posted on Dec 28, 2016

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Where is the PATS module on 2008 Ford F350?


Passive Anti-Theft System (PATS) Transceiver Is behind the steering column shroud . It's around where the ignition lock cylinder is ! There is no PATS module ! The PATS function is controlled by the instrument cluster. The PATS uses the instrument cluster to carry out all of the PATS functions such as receiving the identification code from the PATS key, issuing a signal to the PCM to control the starter and fuel injectors enable, and initiates the key interrogation sequence when the ignition key is turned to the ON or START position. Because of the interaction between the instrument cluster and the PCM, there are parameters that must be reset if the instrument cluster or the PCM (or both) is replaced. For additional information, refer to Passive Anti-Theft System (PATS) Parameter Reset in this section. If the instrument cluster must be replaced for any reason (PATS concerns or instrument cluster concerns), the PATS keys also must be programmed into the new instrument cluster. For additional information, refer to Key Programming Using Diagnostic Equipment in this section. All elements of PATS must be functional before the vehicle will start. If any of the components are not working correctly, the vehicle will not start. Your best bet , take it to the dealer !

May 27, 2017 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

How do I reset anti theft on2000 ford explorer


The passive vehicle protection system will be activated and will disable the vehicle from starting if there is a:
  • damaged encoded key.
  • unprogrammed key.
  • non-encoded key (key has no electronics).
  • wiring concern.
  • transceiver concern.
  • PCM concern.
  • module communications network concern.
Reset ? IF your anti-theft system light is flashing when trying to start your vehicle , an the engine doesn't crank , turn , or nothing happens when you turn key , then your anti theft system is at fault ! An trying to reset will not work ,you need to have it checked DTC'S - diagnostic trouble codes ,then fixed ! I suggest you have it towed to the dealer or a ASE certified repair shop !
PATS uses the powertrain control module (PCM) to enable or disable the engine. The PATS module communicates with the PCM over the SCP communication network in order to enable engine operation. The PATS module and the PCM use sophisticated messages in order to prevent a theft. The PATS and the PCM share security data when first installed together, making them a matched pair. After this security data sharing, these modules will not function in other vehicles. The PCM shared security ID is remembered even if the battery is disconnected. The PATS module also stores the vehicle's key identification code, even if the battery is disconnected. There are special diagnostic repair procedures outlined in this workshop manual that may be carried out if either the PATS module or the PCM needs replacement.

Jan 20, 2016 | Ford Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My f-450 2008 diesel has a continued problem.. signal work with out key and flasher unit stay on continuous while key off.


PATS Transceiver
The PATS transceiver is located under the steering column shroud and communicates with the PATS ignition key. During each vehicle start sequence, the PATS transceiver reads the PATS ignition key identification code and sends data to the IC. The IC validates the code, and if it is the correct code, will send a message to the PCM to ground the starter relay solenoid coil and to also allow the fuel injectors to operate.
PATS Operation
NOTE: If the IC or the PCM is being replaced (or both), the parameters must be reset in both modules or the vehicle will experience a PATS no-start. This will occur even if the vehicle is not equipped with PATS. PATS vehicles and non-PATS vehicles have parameters in the IC and the PCM and they must be reset whenever either (or both) module(s) is (are) replaced. Refer to Passive Anti-Theft System (PATS) Parameter Reset in this section.
The PATS function is controlled by the IC. When the PATS key is turned to the ON or START position, the IC initiates the key interrogation sequence by sending a voltage signal to the PATS transceiver. The transceiver then uses its antenna to bounce a signal off the transponder in the PATS key. This process "reads" the PATS key identification code and sends the key identification code back to the IC, which interprets it and determines if it matches one of the stored key codes. If it does match one of the stored key codes, the IC will send a message to the PCM to ground the starter relay solenoid coil and to also allow the fuel injectors to operate. If it does not match one of the stored key codes, or it is only a partial key read or no key read, the IC will send a message to the PCM to not ground the starter relay solenoid coil and not allow fuel injector operation. The anti-theft indicator in the IC will flash (or may glow steadily) and the IC will store one or more DTCs. All elements of PATS must be functional before the vehicle will start. If any of the components are not working correctly, the vehicle will not start. If the IC must be replaced for any reason (PATS concerns or IC concerns), the PATS keys must also be programmed into the new IC. Refer to Key Programming Using Diagnostic Equipment in this section.
PATS disables the vehicle from starting if there is:
  • a damaged PATS key.
  • a non-programmed PATS key.
  • a non-PATS key (key has no electronics).
  • damaged wiring.
  • a damaged transceiver.
  • a damaged IC.
  • failed parameters between the IC and the PCM.
PATS Parameter Identification (PIDs)
Monitoring the PATS PIDs in the IC can be very useful in determining which diagnostic steps to follow. Viewing the MASTERKEY (verifies if the key is programmed) PID (with both keys) will determine if the key is a programmed key and will also prove out the transceiver, circuitry and the IC. A master key is any key that is programmed into the IC (the MASTERKEY PID must display PRESNT). If the MASTERKEY PID reads NOTPREST, it may mean the key in the ignition lock cylinder is not programmed, is not a PATS key, is damaged or the transceiver, circuitry or IC may be at fault.
Viewing the MIN_KEY (minimum number of keys) PID (this PID does not change) indicates the minimum number of keys that must be programmed into the IC. There must be at least 2 keys programmed into the IC in this type of PATS before the vehicle will start.
Viewing the N_KEYCODE (number of keys programmed) PID will determines if the minimum number of keys have been programmed into the IC. If the N_KEYCODE PID reads 0 or 1, additional key(s) will need to be programmed into the IC in order to meet the minimum of 2 keys. If the N_KEYCODE PID reads 0 or 1, and the MASTERKEY PID reads NOTPREST, that particular key must be programmed into the IC. If the N_KEYCODE PID reads 1, and the MASTERKEY PID reads PRESNT, that particular key is already programmed into the IC.
If the IC was replaced, the parameters in the IC, then the parameters in the PCM will need to be reset. When the parameters in the IC are reset, that clears (erases) the PCM ID from the IC. A parameter reset of the PCM will send a PCM ID to the IC that is necessary for the system to operate. Make sure to make 3-5 attempts to start the vehicle for 3-5 seconds each before attempting more procedures. The extra key cycles are necessary for the PCM ID to be sent (by the PCM) and then stored by the IC. If only a PCM parameter reset occurs, the IC may encounter 2 PCM IDs (the original one and the new one) and may cause a PATS-related no-start. If a PCM parameter reset occurs first, then the IC parameter reset occurs, there will be no PCM ID stored in the IC, and a PATS-related no-start may occur. Carry out the IC parameter reset first, then the PCM parameter reset next. If the PCMID PID reads STORED, the IC has a PCM ID stored. If it reads NOTSTRD, a parameter reset of the PCM may resolve this issue. If the PCMID PID reads STORED, the PCMVER (the PCM ID has been verified) PID will read YES.
If the PATSENABL PID reads DISABLE, and the N_KEYCODE PID reads 2 or more and the MASTERKEY PID reads PRESNT, the IC and the PCM will need to have their parameters reset.
If the PATSENABL PID reads DISABLE, and the N_KEYCODE PID reads 1 and the MASTERKEY PID reads PRESNT, or if the N_KEYCODE PID reads 0 and the MASTERKEY PID reads NOTPRESNT, a minimum of 2 keys will need to be programmed into the IC. Refer to Key Programming Using Diagnostic Equipment in this section.
If the MASTERKEY continues to read NOTPRESNT after programming, this may indicate a defective key. The SPAREKEY (spare key) PID is defaulted to ENABLE. With the SPAREKEY PID displaying ENABLE, the IC will accept more than 2 keys (up to a maximum of 8) being programmed into the IC. Refer to Key Programming Using Two Programmed Keys in this section. It can be toggled to DISABL if the customer does not want any more than 2 keys programmed into the IC. Refer to Key Programming Switch State Control in this section. This switch state control does not affect the Key Programming Using Diagnostic Equipment procedure.
In summary for the IC PATS PIDs and their correct state in order for the vehicle to start:
  • N_KEYCODE must read 2 or more
  • MASTERKEY must read PRESNT
  • PCMID must read STORED
  • PATSENABL must read ENABLE
  • PCMVER must read YES

Aug 24, 2011 | 2008 Ford F 450 Super Duty

1 Answer

P1260


P1260 indicates that the Passive Anti Theft system (PATS) detected a "theft condition". This basically means an incorrect signal, or no signal at all was received from the chipped key. Brief overview: your ignition key has a chip in it called a transponder that is read by the PATS transceiver (mounted around the ignition cylinder housing behind the column shroud). The signal is then sent to the PATS control module, which communicates with the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) and enables the vehicle to start. Sorry for all the acronyms! When an incorrect signal is received, the PATS module then sends this message to the PCM which triggers the P1260 trouble code, resulting in a no start condition. Possible causes are: an incorrect key being used, faulty key chip (transponder), wiring concerns between the transceiver module and PATS module, the transceiver module itself or internal PATS or PCM module concerns. The first thing to do in this instance is retrieve codes from the PATS module and diagnose these. Once the PATS issues have been resolved you can reset the P1260. Communication with the PATS module will likely need to be done at a Ford dealer. A few things to check first: make sure the correct key is being used, and if you have a second key, try that one as well. If one key starts it but not the other, you may have a faulty key. If both keys do not work, then it is not likely a key problem. Honestly, we see very few problems with the keys themselves. Make sure no one has tampered with the steering column shroud as the transceiver module located behind it is fairly fragile. Lastly check for an aftermarket remote start system. These are a common cause of no start problems with PATS equipped vehicles. Some installers will remove the chip from your key and tape it to the column (under the shroud). This basically bypasses the system and allows it to be started without a chipped key. The problem is that the transponder removed from the key is not designed to be used in this way and can fail due to extreme temperature changes and, depending on mounting condition, excessive vibration and shock. Other installers use a "key box" installed under the dash, and these have been known to cause issues as well. If you suspect the concern to be related to a remote start it may not be a bad idea to have it checked or removed to complete diagnosis

May 17, 2011 | Ford Explorer Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

P1260 , on 2001 ford f150, with a 4.6


P1260 = Theft Detected - Engine Disabled

This OBD Code indicates that the Passive Anti Theft system (PATS) detected a "theft condition". This basically means an incorrect signal, or no signal at all was received from the chipped key. Brief overview: your ignition key has a chip in it called a transponder that is read by the PATS transceiver (mounted around the ignition cylinder housing behind the column shroud). The signal is then sent to the PATS control module, which communicates with the Powertrain Control Module (PCM) and enables the vehicle to start.

When an incorrect signal is received, the PATS module then sends this message to the PCM which triggers the P1260 trouble code, resulting in a no start condition. Possible causes are: an incorrect key being used, faulty key chip (transponder), wiring concerns between the transceiver module and PATS module, the transceiver module itself or internal PATS or PCM module concerns. The first thing to do in this instance is retrieve codes from the PATS module and diagnose these. Once the PATS issues have been resolved you can reset the P1260.

Communication with the PATS module will likely need to be done at a Ford dealer. A few things to check first: make sure the correct key is being used, and if you have a second key, try that one as well. If one key starts it but not the other, you may have a faulty key. If both keys do not work, then it is not likely a key problem. Honestly, we see very few problems with the keys themselves. Make sure no one has tampered with the steering column shroud as the transceiver module located behind it is fairly fragile. Lastly check for an aftermarket remote start system. These are a common cause of no start problems with PATS equipped vehicles. Some installers will remove the chip from your key and tape it to the column (under the shroud). This basically bypasses the system and allows it to be started without a chipped key. The problem is that the transponder removed from the key is not designed to be used in this way and can fail due to extreme temperature changes and, depending on mounting condition, excessive vibration and shock. Other installers use a "key box" installed under the dash, and these have been known to cause issues as well. If you suspect the concern to be related to a remote start it may not be a bad idea to have it checked or removed to complete diagnosis.

Also, its possible that you are interesting in check the Ford F-150 - Owners Manual (page 94)

I hope this information has been helpful (remember comment and rated it)



May 28, 2010 | 2001 Ford F150 Styleside SuperCrew

1 Answer

I HAVE REPLACED THE PCM COMPUTER, ACTUALLY, I SENT MINE IN FOR REPAIR. THEY "FLASHED" IT, I PROVIDED VIN, AND ALL OTHER INFO REQUESTED. I REINSTALLED IT, CALLED LOCKSMITH TO "MATE" THE KEY AFTER IT...


SECTION 419-01: Anti-Theft — PATS 2000 F-150 Workshop Manual
DESCRIPTION AND OPERATION Anti-Theft —PATS The passive anti-theft system (PATS) contains the following components:
  • theft indicator
  • encoded ignition key
  • transceiver module
  • instrument cluster
  • powertrain control module (PCM)
  • standard corporate protocol (SCP) communication network
The PATS uses radio frequency identification technology to deter a driveaway theft. Passive means that it does not require any activity from the user. This system is known as SecuriLock® in North America, Safeguard® in the U.K. and PATS in continental Europe. This information can be found in owners literature.
The PATS uses a specially encoded ignition key. Each encoded ignition key contains a permanently installed electronic device called a transponder. Each transponder contains a unique electronic identification code, with over 72 million billion combinations.
Each encoded ignition key must be programmed into the vehicle's instrument cluster (the instrument cluster is also known as a hybrid electronic cluster [HEC]), before it can be used to start the engine. There are special diagnostic procedures outlined in the workshop manual that must be carried out if new encoded ignition keys are to be installed.
The encoded key is larger than a traditional ignition key. The key does not require batteries and should last the life of the vehicle.
The transceiver module communicates with the encoded ignition key. This module is located behind the steering column shroud and contains an antenna connected to a small electronics module. During each vehicle start sequence, the transceiver module reads the encoded ignition key identification code and sends the data to the instrument cluster.
The control functions are contained in the instrument cluster. This module carries out all of the PATS functions such as receiving the identification code from the encoded ignition key and controlling engine enable. The instrument cluster initiates the key interrogation sequence when the vehicle ignition switch is turned to RUN or START.
The PATS uses the PCM to enable or disable the engine. The instrument cluster communicates with the PCM over the SCP network in order to enable engine operation. The instrument cluster and the PCM use sophisticated messages in order to prevent a theft. The instrument cluster and the PCM share security data (when first installed together) that makes them a matched pair. After this security data sharing, these modules will not function in other vehicles. The shared PCM ID is remembered even if the battery is disconnected. The instrument cluster also stores the vehicle's key identification code even if the battery is disconnected. There are special diagnostic procedures outlined in this workshop manual that may be carried out if either a new instrument cluster or PCM needs to be installed.
All elements of PATS must be functional before the engine is allowed to start. If any of the components are not working correctly, the vehicle will not start.
PATS uses a visual theft indicator. This indicator will prove out for three seconds when the ignition switch is turned to RUN or START under normal operation. If there is a PATS problem, this indicator will either flash rapidly or glow steadily (for more than three seconds) when the ignition switch is turned to RUN or START. PATS also "blips" the theft indicator every two seconds at ignition OFF to act as a visual theft deterrent.
The PATS is not compatible with aftermarket remote start systems, which allow the vehicle to be started from outside the vehicle. These systems may reduce the vehicle security level, and also may cause no-start issues. Remote start systems must be removed before investigation of PATS-related no-start issues.


-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Visual Inspection Chart Mechanical Electrical
  • Ignition lock cylinder
  • Encoded ignition key (PATS key)
  • Use of non-encoded ignition key (key without the molded plastic head, non-PAT key)
  • Use of a non-programmed encoded ignition key
  • Central junction box:
    • Fuse 2 (5A)
    • Fuse 6 (5A)
    • Fuse 30 (30A)
  • PATS transceiver
  • Connectors
  • Ignition switch

Mar 11, 2010 | Ford F-150 Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Is there a kill switch for an alarm on a 1998 mountaineer that will help the car start


The passive anti-theft system (PATS) contains the following components:
  • theft indicator
  • encoded ignition key
  • transceiver module
  • PATS control module (located behind the passenger side air bag module)
  • powertrain control module (PCM)
  • standard corporate protocol (SCP) communication network
The passive anti-theft system (PATS) uses radio frequency identification technology to deter a driveaway theft. Passive means that it does not require any activity from the user. This system is known as SecuriLock® in North America, Safeguard® in the U.K., and PATS in continental Europe. This information can be found in customer literature such as the Owners Guide.
The PATS uses a specially-encoded ignition key. Each encoded ignition key contains a permanently installed electronic device called a transponder. Each transponder contains a unique electronic identification code out of over 72 million billion combinations.
Each encoded ignition key must be programmed into a vehicle's PATS module before it can be used to start the engine. There are special diagnostic repair procedures outlined in this manual that must be performed if the encoded ignition keys need to be replaced.
The encoded key is larger than a traditional ignition key. The key does not require batteries and should last the life of the vehicle.
The transceiver module communicates with the encoded ignition key. This module is located behind the steering column shroud, and contains an antenna connected to a small electronics module. During each vehicle start sequence, the transceiver module reads the encoded ignition key identification code and sends the data to the PATS module.
The control functions are contained in the PATS module. This module performs all of the PATS functions such as receiving the identification code from the encoded ignition key and controlling engine enable. The PATS module initiates the key interrogation sequence when the vehicle ignition switch is turned to RUN or START.
PATS uses the p owertrain control module (PCM) to enable or disable the engine. The PATS module communicates with the PCM over the SCP communication network in order to enable engine operation. The PATS module and the PCM use sophisticated messages in order to prevent a theft. The PATS and the PCM share security data when first installed together, making them a matched pair. After this security data sharing, these modules will not function in other vehicles. The PCM shared security ID is remembered even if the battery is disconnected. The PATS module also stores the vehicle's key identification code, even if the battery is disconnected. There are special diagnostic repair procedures outlined in this workshop manual that may be carried out if either the PATS module or the PCM needs replacement.
All the elements of PATS must be functional before the engine is allowed to start. If any of the components are not working correctly, the vehicle will not start.
PATS uses a visual theft indicator. This indicator will prove out for three seconds when the ignition switch is turned to RUN or START under normal operation. If there is a PATS problem, this indicator will either flash rapidly or glow steadily when the ignition switch is turned to RUN or START. PATS also "blips" the theft indicator every two seconds at ignition OFF to act as a visual theft deterrent.
PATS differs from the perimeter anti-theft system in that PATS enables and disables the engine from starting. If equipped, the perimeter anti-theft system protects the perimeter of the vehicle (doors, hood and trunk) and sounds an alarm.
The PATS is not compatible with aftermarket remote start systems, which allow the vehicle to be started from outside the vehicle. These systems may reduce the vehicle security level, and also may cause no-start issues. Remote start systems must be removed before investigation of PATS-related No Start issues.
The passive vehicle protection system will be activated and will disable the vehicle from starting if there is a:
  • damaged encoded key.
  • unprogrammed key.
  • non-encoded key (key has no electronics).
  • wiring concern.
  • transceiver concern.
  • PCM concern.
  • module communications network concern.

Mar 10, 2010 | 1998 Mercury Mountaineer

2 Answers

2001 Ford Windstar, won't start, theft light on, van has a new battery


theft light should be flashing when system is armed. It should reset itself. If on steady, you have a probelem. Try your other key first. This inof should help you. Report back if you still need help.

Anti-Theft —Passive The passive anti-theft system (PATS) contains the following components:
  • theft indicator
  • encoded ignition key
  • PATS transceiver module
  • powertrain control module (PCM)
  • standard corporate protocol (SCP) communication network
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Principles of Operation
The PATS uses a specially encoded ignition key. Each encoded ignition key contains a permanently installed electronic device called a transponder. Each transponder contains a unique electronic identification code out of over 18 billion, billion combinations.
The passive anti-theft system (PATS), also known as SecuriLock ®, uses radio frequency identification technology to deter a driveaway theft. This system is known as Securilock® in North America, Safeguard® in the U.K., and PATS in Continental Europe. Passive means that it does not require any activity from the user.
The SecuriLock® System (PATS) is not compatible with aftermarket remote start systems, which allow the vehicle to be started from outside the vehicle. These systems may reduce the vehicle security level, and also may cause no-start issues. If equipped the remote start system must be removed before investigation of PATS-related, no-start issues.
Each encoded ignition key must be programmed into the vehicle's powertrain electronic control (PCM) before it can be used to start the engine. There are special diagnostic repair procedures described in this section that must be carried out if a new encoded ignition key is necessary.
This system contains a new feature named Unlimited Key Mode. This feature allows a customer to program more than eight keys to the vehicle if they request it. Each vehicle in Unlimited Key Mode is set up with a special Unlimited Transponder Security Key. This allows all the customer vehicles to share the same keys, but no other keys from outside can be used to operate the vehicles. For an individual customer, any randomly selected Security Key is acceptable. Refer to Unlimited Key Mode Programming in Key Programming Switch State Control in this section.
The PATS transceiver module communicates with the encoded ignition key. The module is located behind the steering column shroud and contains an antenna connected to a small electronics module. During each vehicle start sequence, the transceiver module reads the encoded ignition key identification code and sends data to the PCM.
The control functions are contained in the PCM. This module carries out all of the PATS functions, such as receiving the identification code from the encoded ignition key and controlling the engine enable. The PCM initiates the key interrogation sequence when the vehicle ignition switch is turned to RUN or START.
All elements of the PATS must be functional before the engine is allowed to start. If any of the components are not working correctly, the vehicle will not start.
The PATS uses a visual theft indicator. The indicator will prove out for three seconds when the ignition switch is turned to RUN or START under normal operation. If there is a PATS concern, this indicator will either flash rapidly or glow steadily when the ignition switch is turned to RUN or START. The PATS system also flashes the theft indicator every two seconds at ignition OFF to act as a visual deterrent.
The following will activate the PATS and will disable the vehicle from starting:
  • incorrectly encoded ignition key
  • damaged encoded ignition key
  • unprogrammed key
  • non-encoded key (key has no electronics)
  • damaged wiring
  • damaged transceiver
  • damaged PCM
Inspection and Verification
  1. Verify the customer concern by operating the system.
  1. Visually inspect for obvious signs of mechanical and electrical damage.


Visual Inspection Chart Mechanical Electrical
  • Large metallic objects, a second ignition key on the same key ring as the PATS ignition key or electronic devices on the key chain that can be use to purchase gasoline or similar items
  • Ignition lock cylinder
  • PATS key
  • Use of a non-PATS key
  • More than one PATS key on key chain
  • Central junction box (CJB) fuse 16 (15A)
  • Battery junction box (BJB) fuse 20 (15A)
  • PATS transceiver module
  • Ignition switch
  • Loose or corroded connection(s)

May 27, 2009 | 2001 Ford Windstar

1 Answer

My 2005 f150 wont star my anti theft system is


alarm rearms itself.

this is for 2001 and is similar.

Anti-Theft —PATS The passive anti-theft system (PATS) contains the following components:
  • theft indicator
  • encoded ignition key
  • transceiver module
  • instrument cluster
  • powertrain control module (PCM)
  • standard corporate protocol (SCP) communication network
The PATS uses radio frequency identification technology to deter a driveaway theft. Passive means that it does not require any activity from the user. This system is known as SecuriLock® in North America, Safeguard® in the U.K. and PATS in continental Europe. This information can be found in owners literature.
The PATS uses a specially encoded ignition key. Each encoded ignition key contains a permanently installed electronic device called a transponder. Each transponder contains a unique electronic identification code, with over 72 million billion combinations.
Each encoded ignition key must be programmed into the vehicle's instrument cluster (the instrument cluster is also known as a hybrid electronic cluster [HEC]), before it can be used to start the engine. There are special diagnostic procedures outlined in the workshop manual that must be carried out if new encoded ignition keys are to be installed.
The encoded key is larger than a traditional ignition key. The key does not require batteries and should last the life of the vehicle.
The transceiver module communicates with the encoded ignition key. This module is located behind the steering column shroud and contains an antenna connected to a small electronics module. During each vehicle start sequence, the transceiver module reads the encoded ignition key identification code and sends the data to the instrument cluster.
The control functions are contained in the instrument cluster. This module carries out all of the PATS functions such as receiving the identification code from the encoded ignition key and controlling engine enable. The instrument cluster initiates the key interrogation sequence when the vehicle ignition switch is turned to RUN or START.
The PATS uses the PCM to enable or disable the engine. The instrument cluster communicates with the PCM over the SCP network in order to enable engine operation. The instrument cluster and the PCM use sophisticated messages in order to prevent a theft. The instrument cluster and the PCM share security data (when first installed together) that makes them a matched pair. After this security data sharing, these modules will not function in other vehicles. The shared PCM ID is remembered even if the battery is disconnected. The instrument cluster also stores the vehicle's key identification code even if the battery is disconnected. There are special diagnostic procedures outlined in this workshop manual that may be carried out if either a new instrument cluster or PCM needs to be installed.
All elements of PATS must be functional before the engine is allowed to start. If any of the components are not working correctly, the vehicle will not start.
PATS uses a visual theft indicator. This indicator will prove out for three seconds when the ignition switch is turned to RUN or START under normal operation. If there is a PATS problem, this indicator will either flash rapidly or glow steadily (for more than three seconds) when the ignition switch is turned to RUN or START. PATS also "blips" the theft indicator every two seconds at ignition OFF to act as a visual theft deterrent.
The PATS is not compatible with aftermarket remote start systems, which allow the vehicle to be started from outside the vehicle. These systems may reduce the vehicle security level, and also may cause no-start issues. Remote start systems must be removed before investigation of PATS-related no-start issues.

------------------------------------
Visual Inspection Chart Mechanical Electrical
  • Ignition lock cylinder
  • Encoded ignition key (PATS key)
  • Use of non-encoded ignition key (key without the molded plastic head, non-PAT key)
  • Use of a non-programmed encoded ignition key
  • Central junction box:
    • Fuse 2 (5A)
    • Fuse 6 (5A)
    • Fuse 30 (30A)
  • PATS transceiver
  • Connectors
  • Ignition switch

May 11, 2009 | 2005 Ford F-150

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