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I have a 2010 Ranger 4x4 one front wheel campher and toe in are considerable off. What do I adjust to correct?

Posted by Don Yoder on

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2 Answers

Randy Ohler

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
  • 14,585 Answers

First check the suspension. Ball joints, bushing and bearings. Also check to see if the control arms or tie rods are bent. Look at the other side to get and idea. Camber is adjusted by removing or add shims to the upper control arm. Toe is adjusting the tie rod.

Posted on Aug 12, 2016

  • Don Yoder
    Don Yoder Aug 15, 2016

    Where do you add or remove shims on the upper control arm?

  • Randy Ohler Aug 15, 2016

    You have to look at it. JD reminded me of some I have seen. Look at the bolt/s that hold the control arm to the frame. If it is 2 bolts, there is no adjustment. If one long bolts, you will see 2 nuts in the middle of the bolt. The shims would be placed behind the long bolt. Add shims to bring the top out, remove to take it in.

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J.D. Browning

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  • Cars & Trucks Master
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The camber is set on these by the bushings (offset) in the spindle platform and the bushing at anchor point near other side of arm , generally its not repairable its replaceable ! the toe is set by the screw adjustments ball joints attached to rack and pinion steering module , also are you sure its not the wheel bent, use the spare tire to ck adjustments or move a back wheel up front and test it again

Posted on Aug 12, 2016

  • Randy Ohler Aug 12, 2016

    Your right, my bad. The upper control arms aren't adjustable.

  • J.D. Browning
    J.D. Browning Aug 13, 2016

    yep randy im the guy who in 1999 built my own v-8 version of these great trucks (4wd too!!) , I remember the biggest hurdle on these was the steering arm , the darn things were right in the way !! I ended up making one fit from a 72 beetle!!

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1 Answer

How much to toe the front wheels


Toe in / out and all other wheel alignment parameters must be checked and adjusted by a specialist shop that uses specialized equipment to do the adjustments. To your question, yes, a front end alignment by a good auto workshop will bring them back in line.

Mar 01, 2015 | 2000 Lincoln Navigator

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2004 GMC ENVOY whenever making a turn in drive or reverse tires drag on pavement


have the wheel alignment checked for correct camber and toe in- toe out adjustment. Check condition of wheel bearings and adjustment. .Check the front end suspension for wear

Apr 30, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Front Wheel Allignment


On these LH body cars, camber is not adjustable. Neither is caster. Those angles are preset by the suspension geometry. However, specifications for them ARE published. Generally, if either of those two parameters are out of spec, then it's likely something is worn or damaged and needs to be replaced.

The only adjustable parameters are to the front and rear toe but specified as "Total Toe" - see note below.
The alignment specs are as follows ...

ALIGNMENT SPECIFICATIONS AT VEHICLE CURB HEIGHT
A. FRONT WHEELS
  1. CAMBER
    Acceptable -0.6° to +0.6°
    Preferred +0.0°
    Side to Side Differential
    Acceptable 0.7° or less
    Preferred 0.0°
  2. TOTAL TOE - Specified in degrees. See Note Below
    Acceptable 0.4° in -to- 0.0° out
    Preferred 0.2° in
  3. CASTER* (reference angle)
    Acceptable +2.0° -to- +4.0°
    Preferred +3.0°
    *Side to Side Caster Difference not to exceed
    Acceptable 1.0° or less
    Preferred 0.0°
B. REAR WHEELS
  1. CAMBER
    Acceptable -0.6° -to- +0.4°
    Preferred +0.1°
  2. TOTAL TOE** - Specified in degrees. See Note Below.
    Acceptable 0.2° out -to- 0.4° in
    Preferred -0.1° in
    **TOE OUT when backed onto alignment rack is TOE IN when driving.
  3. THRUST ANGLE
    Acceptable -0.15° -to- +0.15°
Note: "Total Toe" is the arithmetic sum of the left and right Toe settings. Positive is Toe-in. Negative is Toe-out. Total Toe must be equally split between left and right wheels. Left and Right Toe must be equal to within 0.02° (2 one hundredths of a degree).

Courtesy RJK & Concorde Shop Manual

Mar 08, 2014 | 1994 Chrysler Concorde

1 Answer

2002 suburban 4x4 has very loose steering at high speeds


One thing I can think of is that the steering gearbox adjustment is too far from the pinion and needs to be tighter. But then your mechanic would have known this and reset it. Only other thing could be that you have the incorrect backset in your front wheels and that would make the vehicle squirly at speed. That happened to me when the wheels I stuck on my vehicle were outset too much. Other than that, only other thing is there is no toe in on the front end. Without a certain degree of toe-in, there's no drag at all and the tires will flop from left to right at will.

Aug 14, 2017 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Toe-in, toe-out for mazda bravo 2600,1997 model, dual cab


This must be set on an alignment machine you just can't move the front wheel to what you think is correct, it must be right on. They toe in slightly on most vehicles

Nov 06, 2012 | 2003 Toyota Corolla

2 Answers

I want to know how to fix the alignment on my 1995 honda accord ex.


Before making wheel alignment adjustment, perform the following checks:
  1. Tires should be equal in size and runout must not be excessive. Tires and wheels should be in balance, and inflated to manufacturer's specifications.

  2. Wheel bearings must be properly adjusted. Steering linkage and suspension must not have excessive looseness. Check for wear in tie rod ends and ball joints.
  3. Steering gear box must not have excessive play. Check and adjust to manufacturer's specifications.
  4. Vehicle must be at curb height with full fuel load and spare tire in vehicle. No extra load should be on vehicle.
  5. Vehicle must be level with floor and with suspension settled. Jounce front and rear of vehicle several times and allow it to settle to normal curb height.
  6. If steering wheel is not centered with front wheels in straight-ahead position, correct by shortening one tie rod adjusting sleeve and lengthening opposite sleeve equal amounts.
  7. Ensure wheel lug nuts are tightened to torque specifications
Ride Height Adjustment

Before adjusting alignment, check riding height. Riding height must be checked with vehicle on level floor and tires properly inflated. Passenger and luggage compartments must be unloaded. Bounce vehicle several times, and allow suspension to settle. Visually inspect vehicle from front to rear and from side to side for signs of abnormal height.
Measure riding height. See figure. Riding height between left and right sides of vehicle should vary less than 1′ (25.4 mm). If riding height is not within specification, check suspension components and repair or replace them as necessary.
Wheel Alignment Procedures

Honda recommends using commercially available computerized 4-wheel alignment equipment. Follow equipment manufacturer instructions to obtain vehicle alignment settings. Use following procedures for necessary adjustments.
Civic Camber Adjustment
Compare camber settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If camber is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck camber.
Civic Caster Adjustment
DO NOT use more than 2 shims. If more than 2 shims are required to adjust caster angle, check for bent or damaged suspension components.
Compare caster settings with vehicle manufacturer recommendations. If caster is incorrect, check for bent or damaged front suspension components. Replace faulty components. Recheck caster.
Civic Toe-In Adjustment

  1. Secure steering wheel in straight-ahead position. Measure front wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, loosen tie rod lock nuts. Turn both tie rods equally in the same direction until front wheels are in straight-ahead position and toe-in reading is correct. Tighten tie rod lock nuts. Reposition tie rod boots if twisted.
  2. Ensure parking brake is released. Check rear wheel toe-in. If adjustment is needed, hold adjusting bolt on rear compensator arm and loosen lock nut. See figure. Adjust rear toe-in by sliding rear control arm until rear toe-in is correct. Install NEW lock nut, and tighten it while holding adjusting bolt.
Wheel Alignment Specifications

  • Camber - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0 (range -1 to 1)
    • Rear: 0.33 (range -1.33 to 0.67)
  • Caster - Measurement in degrees.
    • 1.17 (range 0.17 to 2.17)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in inches (mm).
    • Front: -0 (0)
    • Rear: 0.08 (2.0)
  • Toe-In - Measurement in degrees.
    • Front: 0.00 (range - 0.16 to 0.16)
  • Toe-Out On Turns - Measurement in degrees.
    • Inner: 41.00
    • Outer: 33.50
Torque Specifications Ft. Lbs (N.m)

  • Rear Control Arm Adjusting Bolt: 48 (65)
  • Spindle Nut: 136 (185)
  • Tie Rod Lock Nut: 41 (55)
  • Wheel Lug Nuts: 80 (108)
hope this helps you out.

May 09, 2011 | 1995 Honda Accord

1 Answer

How do you adjust toe in on a 1994 gmc sierra 4x4 truck on front driverside wheel i have new balljoints upper and lower and new shocks and had it aligned at a service center but they didnt fix the toe in...


Bring the Sierra back, that's why they go for test drive and you go for test drive and they should adjust it the way you want it. It may not be the toe in you want adjusted, it just may be the caster. To much toe in will cause your tires to wear out and are more likely plow around corners, even more in the rain and snowy weather.

Having more caster will give you a more stable ride on high way speeds and will not affect the wear on your tires or the any effect on tight turns.

Feb 01, 2010 | 1994 GMC Sierra

3 Answers

Wheel alignment


The main cause of steering wheel off-center is toe misalignment or rear axle misalignment. Toe can fall out of adjustment fairly easily as a result of daily driving, so you can imagine the effects of pounding it through 4WD trails on a regular basis.

Toe is designed to preload the steering linkage to remove play in the system. You can visualize toe angle from above; toe-in, or positive toe, is displayed when the leading edges of the tires are closer together than in the rear. Toe-out, or negative toe, is when the leading edges are farther apart. Zero toe is when wheels are pointed straight ahead and are parallel to each other. A slight amount of positive toe is preferred for most vehicles.

Improper toe angle isn't the only reason a steering wheel won't center. This phenomenon can also be caused by the steering linkage not being centered when toe was adjusted in the first place. This can be corrected by recentering the steering wheel and readjusting toe to proper specs. A bent steering arm or linkage component can also cause the steering wheel to be off-center. I've also seen this occur due to loose steering arm bolts. An off-center steering wheel contributes to tire wear because as the wheels are turned off dead center they turn toe out and increase tire scrubbing.

Sometimes an off-center steering wheel is accompanied by a wheel pull to one direction or the other and could be the result of a damaged component somewhere in the vehicle - a bent axlehousing could be throwing off the rear toe setting (rear toe setting is often overlooked). A bent frame or overly worn suspension bushings can also be the cause. If your wheel is off-center and also pulling, it can be as simple as incorrect tire pressure from side to side. Memory steer is another effect that is usually associated with an off-center steering wheel. This is when the steering wheel returns to an off-center position and can result in steering pull or drift after completing a turn. This can be caused by binding in the steering linkage as well as power steering system issues such as leaks or improper hydraulic pressure. Steering linkage bind occurs when proper geometry is not maintained in lifted vehicles.

Many 4x4s don't have factory provisions for adjusting caster and camber and rear toe and camber, but the front toe setting is easily adjusted. Toe is controlled by the steering linkage. By loosening the adjusters on the tie rod and shortening or lengthening the tie rod by turning the ends, toe angle can be adjusted. This should not be a substitute for regular professional wheel alignment jobs and is simply a tip that can be used to put off frequent trips to the alignment shop due to regular trips to the trail.
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Before determining toe angle and/or performing adjustments, it's a good idea to start the engine and turn the steering wheel side to side to relieve pressure in the system. Then, turn the wheels straight and shut off the engine. You should also roll the vehicle back and forth a few times between measurements.

Get someone to hold the other end of the measuring tape and measure the leading toe distance. This is the distance between the leading edges of the front tires. You'll compare the results to the distance between the trailing edges of the tires directly opposite from where you took the first measurement.

The higher number will indicate toe direction: higher number in leading edge indicates toe out; higher number at trailing edge displays toe in. Larger-than-stock tires require more positive toe for best results.

Once the necessary measurements are performed to determine what the current toe setting is, you can loosen the bolts on the tie-rod adjuster sleeve so that the tie-rod ends can be rotated. Don't forgot to tighten the adjusters when you're done as damage or injury could result.

The tie-rod ends thread into the tie rod. The ends can be threaded in or out of the tie rod to make the assembly longer or shorter. Longer creates more toe out; shorter toe in. Don't make huge adjustments all at once. It's best to adjust and measure a few times to achieve appropriate setting.
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I hope this helps you if you were looking to do a toe alignment yourself if you have decent knowledge of component location on a jeep.

Jan 30, 2009 | 1995 Jeep Grand Cherokee

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