Question about 2003 Pontiac Montana

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How to replace oil cooler

I have a large amount of oil in water resoirvour and need directions how to change the oil cooler

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Dave Dahlberg

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The problem is NOT your oil cooler, You have a blown gasket. Which is really bad, very expensive to fix. usually means replacing the engine. I REPEAT, IT IS NOT THE OIL COOLER!!!

Posted on Aug 01, 2014

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2 Answers

I removed the oil filler cap and there was a cream substance around cap.what can cause this?


Moisture builds up after the engine cools down and mixes with oil residue. This is an emulsion of oil and water that is common in areas that have large temperature variations. If you're in a hot climate this should not happen unless you're getting water into the oil. I would change the oil, heat it up completely then change it again while it's at it's hottest. Not fun but comparatively cheaper than a new engine by far. Probably nothing to worry about if you live in large variations of temperature. Wipe it out with carb cleaner & make sure your air filter is clean.

Apr 09, 2015 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

Engine diagram


That is the oil cooler. Remove the oil filter. That exposes a large 'nut'. Remove the nut (and the 2 lines going in/out) and replace the oil gasket/O ring. If original oil cooler is dent or damaged, replace cooler as well. Could also just come from the lines going in and out of the cooler (put new hose clamps on).

Jan 05, 2014 | 1997 Audi A4

1 Answer

How do get at 7.3 started after changing the oil cooler?


Would you clarify your question 7.3???? Quarts or is that an engine size
If you Just added an Oil Cooler to an engine filling the cooler with oil is rather simple Add the correct amount of oil to your engine and start the vehicle as your pump runs the oil will circulate into your new cooler and you only add as much oil as it takes to bring the level up to the manufacturers level.If you Just changed the Oil cooler and your engine will not start Check everything you did while replacing it you may have disconnected an electrical part that is causing your Failure.

May 04, 2012 | Ford F-350 Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

Hi, i have automatic passat 1999 model and recently water happens to get into the gear box and it control board, i experiences a boom sound anytime the gear is changed, the oil has been changed by the...


If no external leak and the transmission fluid colour looks white, the problem belongs to the automatic gearbox oil cooler. The oil cooler has broke mixing the gearbox oil and coolant causing this milkshake. It's a small radiator core type oil / water heat exchanger. It is cracked inside and transmission oil is mixed with engine coolant. Because the transmission oil pressure is greater than engine coolant pressure, the transmission fluid level drops. See also the coolant colour inside recovery coolant reservoir inder bonnet! It could be like this:

tdisline_495.jpg
The automatic gearbox oil cooler type oil / water heat exchanger (oil cooler):

tdisline_496.jpg
In the picture above the transmission oil pan was removed for oil filter replacement.

May 05, 2011 | 1999 Volkswagen Passat

2 Answers

I have a small amount of oil and water (mayonnaise) in my air filter and car feels sluggish and doesn't start properly


oil is mixing with coolant then only it can happen , replace oil cooler cause oil cooler it is mixing, ,and clean all hose radiator for sludge free.

Jan 21, 2010 | 2001 Ford Focus

1 Answer

I have a pin hole in my turbos intercooler! I believe it's my intercooler! It's a thin radiator that runs oil through! Anyway, I was wondering if there was an easy fix or if I need to just get a new one!...


The IC will have some blowby oil in it, but if you are referring to the small radiator looking thing on the passenger side that has two oil lines running to it, you are actually talking about your oil cooler. The IC is rather large by comparison and sits directly behind the bumper and directly in front of the radiator and it runs the full side to side length of the radiator. It has a large inlet hose from the turbo and a large exit hose to the turbo delivery pipe that runs to the throttle body. If you have a leak in the IC, you will notice decreased boost at WOT. If it is actually the oil cooler, keep a close eye on it. These do fail given enough time, and a small leak will become a large one, usually at the worst possible moment. Ultimately, you will have to replace it. The stock unit is costly. Some people use an aftermarket and relocate to in front of the radiator and above the IC. Flex-a-lite makes several that will fit this location. Remember, if you go this route, you will need longer hoses.

Jun 14, 2009 | 1996 Saab 900

3 Answers

Oil in water resovour vw 2002 passat


Could be just the OIL COOLER. VW IS CORRECT.
If the oil cooloer fails internely you will have a mix of coolant and oil. In the engine and in the Radiator,

But not to say the other guys were wrong...

May 27, 2009 | 2003 Volkswagen Passat

4 Answers

Engine oil dipstick shows water and rust mixed in with oil


Everyone always jumps to head gaskets. There are plenty of MINOR things that can be looked at first.
The Volvo 2.3, 2.4, 2.5 Inline 5 Cylinder dipstick tube is known to develop a large amount of condensationin winter months and stop and go driving. What you see on your dip stick is possibly just condensation. Take off your oil cap and look under the cap and inside the valve cover. Is there any thick foamy oatmeal like substance or noticeable amounts of water? If your oil was saturated with coolant, you would be able to see it up there too. Check your coolant for oil. Volvo coolant is typically brown to orange, however make sure there is no sludge. Start the car with the cap off and keep an eye out for alot of bubbles. A large amount of bubbles is a sign of a bad head gasket. A couple here and there is just air in your cooling system.
Coolant, Transmission fluid, and Oil have several places they can mix. If you have a turbocharged Volvo, the seals in the turbo can go bad and cause a mix of oil and coolant. Your transmission cooler is also in your radiator, and if it cracks your transmission fluid and coolant can mix. I believe turbo models have an oil cooler built into the radiator as well.
Overall if your car sounds fine, you dont see oatmeal, your not using coolant and oil in excessive amounts, dont have white smoke, and your turbo isnt whining you probably just have condensation in your dip stick. If you are overly concerned you can send a sample of your oil to a lab and have it tested for traces of coolant. Headgaskets rarely fail on Volvo's, even the old ones....I have seen many that have gone to replace them have not found a failed gasket and end up finding a bad transmission cooler or a bad turbo.

May 09, 2009 | 1999 Volvo S70

1 Answer

Drove threw large amount of water!


Drain all the fuel out of your vehicle. Remove the air filter and check to make sure water did not get into the fuel injection system. If you did you will also need to drain your oil and replace that also. Last check your tranny and make sure not water is in there.

Apr 14, 2009 | 2008 Dodge Charger

2 Answers

Oil cooler seal


There are two items that can be leaking oil there. There is a gasket between the oiler cooler flange (the item attached to the engine), and the rubber gasket/seal that goes between the cooler and the flange. (the latter is the one that leaks most often as most oil change shops over tighten the oil filter).
I just replaced the gasket between the cooler and flange recently. I chose to do it quick and dirty: 1. remove oil filter 2. remove oil filter nipple (the portion you screw the filter onto) 2a. you'll need a deep well socket to get the bolt that holds the cooler tight (I believe 27mm)
2b. pull down the cooler, Grab the nipple with a pair of pliers between the flange and cooler and loosen/remove
3. remove old gasket/seal and clean surface 4. put new seal/gasket in place 5. re-seat the nipple back in. use the pliers method, just make sure you don't scar the threads where you NEED them( you don't need all of them). 6. put some gasket sealer (oil friendly) on the gasket and make sure its in place 7. tighten oil cooler onto flange with large nut and socket 8. replace oil filter and add oil as needed.
it is a tight working area, expect some scrapped knuckles, but it isn't too difficult.
good luck

Dec 06, 2008 | 1996 Volkswagen Jetta

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