Question about 1989 Ford Crown Victoria

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Coolant not flowing through the system no pressure.

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Jack Craven

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Not sure what problem you are having. When you first crank the car the thermostat will be closed preventing fluid flow that you would normally see when the radiator cap is removed. Once the engine warms up the tstat opens and the fluid flows.

Don't open the radiator when it's hot it could be under pressure and put hot fluid on you.

If it's overheating then the most likely cause is the thermostat being stuck in the closed position.

Posted on Aug 24, 2013

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Why did my 2011 DTS Cadillac overheat?


An overheated engine can be caused by anything that decreases the cooling system's ability to absorb, transport and dissipate heat; therefore engines can overheat for a variety of reasons. Let's take a look at some of the most common causes.
Cooling System Leaks
This is the primary cause of engine overheating. Possible leak points include hoses, the radiator, water pump, thermostat housing, heater core, head gasket, freeze plugs, automatic transmission oil cooler, cylinder heads and block. Perform a pressure test. A leak-free system should hold pressure for at least one minute.
Wrong Coolant Concentration
Be sure to use the coolant recommended by your vehicle's manufacturer. The wrong type of coolant and/or mixing the incorrect concentration of coolant and distilled water can also result in engine overheating. The best bet is to perform a complete flush and fill.
Bad Thermostat
A thermostat is a heat-sensitive valve that opens and closes in response to engine temperature. Heated engine coolant passes through to the radiator when the thermostat is in the open position. In the closed position, it prevents the flow of coolant to speed up the warming of a cold engine. When the thermostat gets stuck in the closed position, coolant stays in the engine and quickly becomes overheated, resulting in engine overheating.
Blocked Coolant Passageways
Rust, dirt and sediment can all block or greatly impede the flow of coolant through the cooling system. This can limit the system's ability to control engine temperature, which may result in higher operating temperatures and engine overheating. Once again, a flush and fill is recommended to remove debris.
Faulty Radiator
By passing through a series of tubes and fins, coolant temperature is reduced in the radiator. Leaks and clogging are some of the most common causes of radiator failure. Any disruption in the radiator's function can lead to elevated engine temperature and overheating.
Worn/Burst Hoses
A hose that contains visual cracks or holes, or has burst will result in leaks and disrupt the flow of engine coolant. This can result in overheating.
Bad Radiator Fan
A fan blows air across the radiator fins to assist in reducing the temperature of the coolant. A fan that wobbles, spins freely when the engine is off, or has broken shrouds will not be able to reduce the temperature to proper level, thus possibly resulting in engine overheating.
Loose or Broken Belt
A belt is often the driving link that turns the water pump at the correct speed for proper coolant flow through the cooling system. If a belt is loose or broken, it cannot maintain the proper speed, thus resulting in poor coolant flow and ultimately, engine overheating.
Faulty Water Pump
Known as the 'heart' of the cooling system, the water pump is responsible for pressurizing and propelling engine coolant through the cooling system. Any malfunction of the water pump, including eroded impeller vanes, seepage or wobble in the pump shaft, can prevent adequate coolant flow and result in engine overheating.

Oct 13, 2016 | 2011 Cadillac DTS

3 Answers

What is causing my truck to still overheat after I replaced the thermostat.


What is year--make--model? Are you just going by the temp gage, are there other overheating issues? Is the coolant boiling or anything, are you losing coolant?
Some possibilities, air in the system, radiator, radiator fan, water pump, combustion gases in the coolant. I'm sure I'm leaving something out?

Nov 18, 2014 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

My 2006 nissan xterra is having over heat what is the cause


to many things could be the cause,this is not some thing that can be answered with out having a lot more information,could be anything from the electric fan relay bad,to a hole in the radiator,water pump out,head gasket blown,cracked head,cracked cylinder liner,too low on coolant,but a real common one in a cracked over flow tank,or no over flow tank,while your motor is running the temp will get higher while not moving,the radiator will build pressure above the the max cap pressure,and the over flow hose will deliver coolant to the over flow tank,then as the motor cools and the radiator pressure drops,then the thermostate will open and the radiator will suck the coolant back into the radiator,this will continue all day as you drive,but without an over flow tank to force coolant into,it will force it out and it will go on the ground,the when the time comes to return the coolant to the radiator,so the radiator don\'t have coolant so it will take air back into the radiator,and in no time the coolant system will be out of coolant,this is common,or there is no coolant fan,or when using the AC the electric fan isn\'t coming on,or the fan is missing the shroud,there are endless possibilitys

Dec 30, 2012 | 2001 Nissan Xterra

2 Answers

Over heating on my dodge intrepid 1997 after short time of driving


CHECK ENGINE COOLANT LEVEL.MAKE SURE COOLANT OVER FLOW JUG HAS COOLANT IN FULL COLD MARK.IF COOLANT OVER FLOW JUG IS EMPTY RADIATOR GOT TO BE LOW ON COOLANT POUR COOLANT IN THE OVER FLOW UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL STAY AT THE COLD FULL MARK.SEE IF RADIATOR DONT HAVE A RADIATOR CAP YOU HAVE TO POUR COOLANT IN THE OVER FLOW JUG COOLANT WILL FLOW DOWN IN RADIATOR UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL STOP AT FULL COLD MARK.IF COOLANT LEVEL OKAY.YOUR THERMOSTAT NEED CHANGING ALSO RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP.HAVE RADIATOR FLUSHED OUT.HAVE ENGINE BLOCK FLUSHED OUT.CHECK ENGINE OIL IF OIL LOOK LIKE MILK SHAKE ON OIL DIP STICK YOU HAVE LEAKING HEAD GASKET THAT WILL CAUSE ENGINE OVER HEAT WHILE CAR IN MOTION.CHECK WATER PUMP MAKE SURE ITS WEEP HOLE NOT LEAKING ANTIFREEZE IF SO WATER PUMP NEED REPLACING.

Jun 20, 2011 | 1997 Dodge Intrepid

1 Answer

My coolant resevoir is full but top coolant hose is empty. Is there a bleeder system?


Here is a basic description of cooling system, the top hose going to engine is the supply hose the bottom hose is the return hose. On your overflow coolant reservoir there is a lower cold level mark and a hot level mark above it also there is an overflow drain spout several inches above hot level mark to relieve pressure if system is overfilled. As to a bleeder system, bleeders purge air from a system to allowed it to become primed (pressure built up) generally on hydraulic systems like brakes or pneumatic systems like a diaphram pump for example. the only drain available is the petcock valve at the bottom of the radiator used to drain coolant. Now to your top hose being empty, you can remove top hose to engine have a garden hose running into radiator and if radiator cores are not stopped up water should flow freely from hose if not radiator is clogged. If you have water flow now you can pressure test system it should hold between 15-18lbs pressure constantly otherwise check all hoses/clamps etc (if leaks were present before replace faulty component/s) your vehicles water pump circulates coolant and is what pressurizes cooling system. A faulty thermostat will also restrict coolant from entering the engines coolant passageways if it doesn't open and your vehicle would overheat soon after, but you should still have coolant in upper hose when engine is running regardless. If you can add other info like your vehicle is running hot or coolant light coming on I can narrow it down for you.

Jan 07, 2011 | 1996 Pontiac Sunfire

1 Answer

1999 alero changed thermstat and the car will intermitantly overheat there seems to be no pattern.


BLEED AIR OUT COOLANT SYSTEM.WAIT UNTIL ENGINE COOL DOWN.REMOVE COOLANT OVER FLOW PRESSURE CAP.IF YOU HAVE 3.1 OR 3.4 ENGINE OPEN AIR BLEED SCREW ON WATER PUMP BYPASS HOSE.OPEN BLEED SCREW.WATCH COOLANT IN OVER FLOW AS YOU OPEN BLEED SCREW COOLANT WILL DROP IN OVER FLOW JUG. AS IT DROPS CLOSE BLEED SCREW ADD MORE COOLANT IN OVER FLOW JUG DO THIS UNTIL COOLANT LEVEL STAY AT COLD FULL MARK.WHEN DONE TIGHTEN BLEED SCREW DONT OVER TIGHTEN IT OR IT WILL STRIP OUT BREAK.CRANK CAR UP UNTIL THERMOSTAT OPEN THAT WHEN TOP RADIATOR HOSE GET HOT.WATCH COOLANT GAUGE,IF ENGINE TEMPERATURE RISES TURN OFF ENGINE WAIT UNTIL COOL.REMOVE RADIATOR PRESSURE CAP USING A RAG TO KEEP FROM GETTING HANDS SCALED.ADD MORE COOLANT IF NEEDED WHEN ENGINE COOLANT STOP DROPPING IN OVER FLOW JUG AND ENGINE DONT OVER HEAT AIR IS OUT OF COOLANT SYSTEM.

Sep 13, 2010 | 1999 Oldsmobile Alero

1 Answer

Where do i refill coolant? message reading low engine coolant.


please rate, thx Coolant Recovery System NOTE: When the water thermostat (8575) is closed, there is no flow through the radiator coolant recovery reservoir (8A080).

Trapped air in the cooling system must be removed. A pressurized radiator coolant recovery reservoir system is used which continuously separates the air from the cooling system.
  • When the water thermostat is open, coolant flows through the small hose from the top of the radiator outlet tank to the radiator coolant recovery reservoir.
  • The radiator coolant recovery reservoir separates any trapped air from the coolant and replenishes the system through its radiator coolant recovery hose to the water thermostat housing.
  • The radiator coolant recovery reservoir serves as the location for:
    • service fill
    • coolant expansion during warm-up
    • system pressurization from the pressure relief cap and
    • air separation during operation
  • The radiator coolant recovery reservoir is designed to have approximately 0.5-1 liter (0.53-1.06 quarts) of air when cold to allow for coolant expansion.

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Jul 08, 2009 | 1995 Lincoln Continental

1 Answer

I need to know what the part is called and how to fix it. The part is leaking hot coolant fluid, it is a ''y'' shape tubing that feels like hard plastic, black in color. It runs on the left side to the...


sounds like hoses going to heater core but they are rubber usually. But it could be the hoses for the degs bottle mounted on the passenger side inner fender.

Coolant Recovery System NOTE: When the water thermostat (8575) is closed, coolant flows through the degas tube and hose assembly from the lower intake manifold to the radiator coolant recovery reservoir (8A080) .

Trapped air in the cooling system must be removed. A pressurized radiant coolant recovery reservoir system is used which continuously separates the air from the cooling system.
  • When the water thermostat is open, coolant flows through both the small hose from the top of the radiator outlet tank and the degas tube and hose assembly from the engine to the radiator coolant recovery reservoir.
  • The radiator coolant recovery reservoir separates any trapped air from the coolant and replenishes the system through its radiator coolant recovery hose.
  • The radiator coolant recovery reservoir serves as the location for:
    • service fill.
    • coolant expansion during warm-up.
    • system pressurization from the pressure relief cap.
    • air separation during operation.
  • The radiator coolant recovery reservoir is designed to have approximately 0.5-1 liter (0.53-1.06 quarts) of air when cold to allow for coolant expansion

Apr 08, 2009 | 1995 Ford Taurus

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