Question about Chrysler 300

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I have replaced the the Thermostat on my Chrysler 300 with the 5.7 Hemi Engine. It still over heats. Is there more than one thermostat on thi engine?

My 2007 Chrysler 300 overheats. I have removed the Thermostat located above the water pump. I also blow are into the upper vRadiator hose and coolant was forced back out of the water pump without using much pressure so I don't think the Radiator is clogged. When the vehicle is oveheating the upper radiator hose is hot while the coolant inside the coolant filler tank is still cold. I have not located the lower radiator hose and the hose on the filler tank goes to the firewall. Is there a second valve or thermastat the maybe blocking coolant flow ??

Posted by Milton Wilson on

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Mike Gilbreath

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  • 78 Answers

You didn't state when it overheats, if it is while driving the fault can be : belt driving water pump slipping , lower radiator hose collapsing, most common is clogged radiator. Start the engine with the radiator cap off when it is COLD and observe the flow in side. If you see really fast flow of coolant you have the bottom portion of the radiator stopped up. The only way to know is to remove the radiator and have it flow tested.
A blown head gasket or cracked head will cause steam to come out of the exhaust, water in the oil (milky). If it is running hot while idling , check fan to see if it is turning as it should when it should. Older cars have fan clutches that go bad, newer ones have temp thermostats that go bad.

Posted on Apr 30, 2017

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5 Related Answers

Anonymous

  • 77 Answers

SOURCE: 1998 Dodge Durango no heat when using heater.

BLEND DOOR STUCK OR BROKEN. NEEDS TO REMOVE DASH AND HEATER/EVAP CORE BOS TO REPAIR REPLACE.

Posted on Jan 08, 2009

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Anonymous

  • 70 Answers

SOURCE: Excess pressure in coolant system-gage will peg Hot.

sounds like you have air bubbles in the system

Posted on Oct 10, 2009

Anonymous

  • 75 Answers

SOURCE: My 99 Cavalier keeps steaming and overheating. I

90's Cavaliers are notorious for problems such as these.

I hate to be the barrier of bad news, but in this case I would suggest that your engine either has a blown head gasket, and/or a warped head.

There is also the possibility that you blew a "soft plug" or cracked the block and that the coolant is leaking out through the base of the engine.

To find out of you have a blown head gasket, you can remove the oil cap from the valve cover and inspect it. If it has a yellow-brown-ish goo that is the consistency of paint, then you definitely have a blown head gasket and coolant has mixed with your oil. Meaning that you likely need an overhall.

You can also check by removing your radiator cap and checking to see if little tiny bubbles come up while the car is running. That is a sign of a compression leak, meaning that you most likely have a crack somewhere in either the cylinder head or the block.

Also, those cars have many very small radiator hoses that are in the middle of the engine and hard to see, find or replace.

In this instance, it sounds like your car has over heated more than 4 times, and once you get to that point you are likely to have fried the engine. This is because the newer engines are mostly aluminum and can't stand that much heat that often.

I would suggest seeking either a new car, or seeking a used engine to replace in your car. A used engine for those is fairly cheap compared to the price of fixing the problems that are likely to have occurred from excessive over heating.

Posted on Nov 11, 2009

vandercoeur

  • 437 Answers

SOURCE: overheating: 1999 bmw 323i m series 2.5

the water pump and thermostat should have solved it. an air pocket can cause that but usually not to that degree.

don't get one of those cheap *** plastic impeller water pump for sissies. Get the metal impeller one. get a cool running thermostat and drill two 3/16" holes in it 180 degreess from each other. you may have installed the t-stat backwards.

Posted on Jun 20, 2010

Anonymous

  • 5 Answers

SOURCE: 2002 ford focus svt, overheating,

If I understand your problem correctly if sounds as if the engine mount bolts broke which allowed the engine to drop which may have kinked your radiator hose, that caused a flow problem and the engine over heated.
If this is what you are saying it is possible the inner liner of the hose ruptured and folded in causeing a restriction in the hose, this use to be fairly common with hose's in the 50's and 60's but is pretty rare these days.
You need to check the hose for soft spots, if you do not find anything there its time for some tests, the first would be to remove the thermostat and run the engine to see if you have flow in the radiator, if your radiator has a cap at the side tank run the engine with the coolant a little low, if there is flow your will be able to see the coolant coming out of the tubes inside at the top of the core. If there is no flow you need to take a better look at the hose and possible the water pump impeller.

Posted on Nov 20, 2010

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1 Answer

How do i install a new thermostst on chrysler 300 2005


If this is the 3.5 the thermostat is where the lower radiator connects to the engine remove the hose and housing and replace the stat2_25_2013_7_23_42_pm.jpg

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The engine light came on and a code reader states "Coolant thermostat - coolant temperature below thermostat regulating temperature". I assume the thermostat is bad. Can you provide details on...


I read that as telling you the coolant temperature is not high enough to open the thermostat, thus if you replace it the new one will not open either as the coolant has to be warm enough to open it. If the heater/defroster is working I think your thermostat is working fine. I think perhaps another analyzer should be utilized before you start taking things apart. The diagnostic testers at the dealer cost in the thousands, the ones at autozone cost about 40 bucks. And it helps so much to have someone who has seen this before do the testing as opposed to someone who was making pizza last week.

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I have a 2006 chrysler 300 3.5 where is the thermostat located at?


Right in the front of the engine,on the top you are going to see the radiator hose connected to the part where the thermostat is inside.

Nov 11, 2010 | 2005 Chrysler 300

1 Answer

2005 Chrysler 300 thermostat location?


Hi,

In your Model :-

The automotive thermostat is a temperature controlled on and off valve. When the temperature rises to a predetermined temperature, the thermostat opens up to allow the engine coolant to flow through the cylinder block and the radiator. This flow is crucial to maintain optimum operating temperature for fuel efficiency, enhanced driveability, and engine protection. The coolant flow is reduced when the engine is cold, and the flow is increased when the engine is hot. Contrary to popular opinion, operating the vehicle without the thermostat doesn't make the engine run cooler. It will actually run hotter because there isn't a thermostat to slow the coolant flow. This means the coolant doesn't stay in the radiator long enough to dissipate its heat.

TO TEST THERMOSTAT

There are several ways to test the opening temperature of a thermostat.
One method does not require that the thermostat be removed from the engine.
  • Remove the radiator pressure cap from a cool radiator and insert a thermometer into the coolant.
  • Start the engine and let it warm up. Watch the thermometer and the surface of the coolant.
  • When the coolant begins to flow, this indicates the thermostat has started to open.
  • The reading on the thermometer indicates the opening temperature of the thermostat.
  • If the engine is cold and coolant circulates, this indicates the thermostat is stuck open and must be replaced.
The other way to test a thermostat is to remove it.
  • Suspend the thermostat completely submerged in a small container of water so it does not touch the bottom.
  • Place a thermometer in the water so it does not touch the container and only measures water temperature.
  • Heat the water.
  • When the thermostat valve barely begins to open, read the thermometer. This is the opening temperature of this particular thermostat.
  • If the valve stays open after the thermostat is removed from the water, the thermostat is defective and must be replaced.
  • Several types of commercial testers are available. When using such a tester, be sure to follow the manufacturer's instructions.
  • Markings on the thermostat normally indicate which end should face toward the radiator. Regardless of the markings, the sensored end must always be installed toward the engine.
  • When replacing the thermostat, also replace the gasket that seals the thermostat in place and is positioned between the water outlet casting and the engine block.
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Positioning a thermostat into an engine.
  • Generally, these gaskets are made of a composition fiber material and are die-cut to match the thermostat opening and mounting bolt configuration of the water outlet.
  • Thermostat gaskets generally come with or without an adhesive backing. The adhesive backing of gaskets holds the thermostat securely centered in the mounting flange, leaving both hands of the technician free to align and bolt the thermostat securely in place.

TO REPLACE THERMOSTAT

CAUTION
If the radiator is filled to the top with coolant and the engine is run without the radiator cap in place, the coolant will expand and spill over as the engine warms up.
  • Drain some coolant into a clean container until the coolant level is below the thermostat housing.
  • Remove the upper radiator hose connection from the thermostat housing.
  • Loosen the housing bolts and remove the housing.
  • Remove the gasket and scrape it carefully from the surface of the housing and the mounting surface on the engine. If the gasket remains on either of the surfaces, there will probably bea coolant leak after reassembly. Some engines use a rubber O-ring to seal a thermostat housing.
  • Compare the size of the thermostat to the old one. They are of different sizes, types, and temperature ratings.
  • The temperature rating is stamped on the sensing bulb on the bottom of the thermostat. The temperature bulb faces the block.
  • When replacing a thermostat, be sure that the thermostat fits into the groove in the block or outlet housing. If the thermostat is installed upside down, the engine will overheat.
  • Install the gasket.
  • Reinstall the thermostat housing. Refill the system and run the engine or pressure test to check for leaks.
  • When the engine has reached operating temperature make sure the thermostat opens.
  • You should be able to see coolant circulating within the radiator.
  • Another way of checking thermostat operation is to feel the top of the radiator hose or use a thermometer or multimeter with a temperature probe to confirm that the coolant is warming up.
  • If the engine is overheating, but the top hose is still cool to the touch, the thermostat is stuck closed and must be replaced.
NOTE When a paper gasket is used and the recess is in the thermostat housing, it is a good practice to position the thermostat into the recess and glue the gasket to hold it in place. If it falls out of its groove during installation, the outlet housing can be cracked or a coolant leak will result. Before tightening the water outlet housing, try to rock it back and forth to be sure it is flush. Housings are often cracked during this step.

Hope i helped you.

Thanks for using ' Fixya ' and have a nice day!!



Oct 07, 2009 | 2005 Chrysler 300

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2005 Chrysler 300 V8-5.7L VIN H

Coolant Temperature Sensor/Switch (For Computer): Service and Repair
ENGINE COOLANT TEMP SENSOR
REMOVAL
The Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor (3) on the 5.7L engine is located under the air conditioning compressor. It is installed into a water jacket at the front of the cylinder block.
WARNING: HOT, PRESSURIZED COOLANT CAN CAUSE INJURY BY SCALDING. COOLING SYSTEM MUST BE
PARTIALLY DRAINED BEFORE REMOVING THE COOLANT TEMPERATURE SENSOR.
1. Partially drain the cooling system.
2. Remove accessory drive belt.
3. Carefully unbolt air conditioning compressor from front of engine. Do not disconnect any A/C hoses from compressor. Temporarily support
compressor to gain access to ECT sensor (3).
4. Disconnect electrical connector (2) from sensor (3).
5. Remove sensor (3) from cylinder block.
INSTALLATION
1. Apply thread sealant to sensor threads.
2. Install ECT sensor (3) to engine.
3. Tighten sensor to 11 Nm (97.3 inch lbs.) torque.
4. Connect electrical connector (2) to ECT sensor (3).
5. Fill the cooling system.

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1 Answer

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The correct way to replace the thermostat would be to replace the actual part with a new one, not from a junkyard or anything and put a new gasket in with the new part.

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