Question about 1998 Plymouth Breeze

2 Answers

Overheating coolant boiling out into reserve tank

Overheating after 10 minutes, losing coolant as it boils into overflow tank, pressure gets higher as coolant boils out and overheats car. No water in oil, but idles rough when very hot, pressure hisses when hot out from Intake manifold when very hot and around Radiator cap but losing coolant out from reserve tank or somewhere when boiling, awnd overheats as coolant level gets lower.

Posted by robert preston on

Ad

2 Answers

terry rudolph

  • Level 2:

    An expert who has achieved level 2 by getting 100 points

    MVP:

    An expert that gotĀ 5 achievements.

    Governor:

    An expert whose answer gotĀ voted for 20 times.

    New Friend:

    An expert that has 1 follower.

  • Expert
  • 112 Answers

You have a blown head gasket.. doesn't have to have coolant in the oil for a blown head gasket... if hoses are rock hard when running then you have exhaust leaking into the coolant via a blown head gasket...

Posted on Jul 14, 2012

  • Guadalupe Aguilar
    Guadalupe Aguilar Jul 21, 2015

    thank you very much..........

×

Ad

Barbara Medina

  • Level 1:

    An expert who has achieved level 1.

    New Friend:

    An expert that has 1 follower.

  • Contributor
  • 4 Answers

Temperature sensor located behind passenger headlight under hood in front of reserve tank...replace it

Posted on Apr 07, 2017

Ad

5 Related Answers

jerry

  • 42 Answers

SOURCE: car overheating

first thing to check is the fan make sure they turn on when engine is hot install a new thermostat if that dont work check radiator for proper circulation and the final will be a new water pump & new head gasket send the cylinder head to a machine shop to verify any internal damage.

Posted on Jul 13, 2012

John P Schwantes Jr

  • 1509 Answers

SOURCE: WHEN I TURN OFF MY

Two things it might be the cars raditor fan doesn't work, or the therostate is sticking. ( the gauge does'nt have to be right) the other thing might it need a new raditor cap. Most all cars pust raditor fluild to the overflow when thier shut off if it's low it'll be gas not coolant. the hose between the cap and the tank may have a small leak and it's not sucking the coolant out of the resivoir back to the raditor. The system is designed to be completly full(no air). If you can remove the cap with the car cool and it's not full clear to overflowing the cap or the hose is bad. Being it's nor leaking I'd go with the cap. Get the kind that came with the car not one with a lever.

Posted on Dec 06, 2010

bitchn65cuda

anel liberto

  • 70 Answers

SOURCE: overheating AND LOSING COOLANT 92 PLLYMOUTH

Has your check engine light turned on....and is still on? if no light is on its a leak on your radiator or as simple as the radiator drainer loose. those radiators are made of plastic and are not made to last! good luck!

Posted on Jul 11, 2009

Ronnie Houston

  • 2920 Answers

SOURCE: temp gauge and light come on and dies

you may need to change your heater core to allow the water to circulate better,,,it sounds like it may be partially clogged

Posted on Jan 13, 2009

jeff langille

  • 6 Answers

SOURCE: radiator boiling water out into recovery tank and temp is normal

check your thermostat, the little needle in the middle of them get stuck sometimes.

Posted on Apr 20, 2012

Add Your Answer

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...

Related Questions:

2 Answers

We have mazda mpv 2000....it was overheating and


need to presurice the system to see the leak

Sep 20, 2014 | 2000 Mazda MPV

1 Answer

Overheating


Doesn't sound like it ran hot enough or long enough to crack or warp the head. If there is a crack, the engine will continue to overheat. If a warped head, car would probably run rough, the affected cylinders would likely have little or no compression, there would be a noticeable miss, and overheating would continue.
Why the low coolant? It's a sealed system, so should never have to add coolant, other than a small loss from evaporation in the overflow tank. Monitor the level closely for the next few days. Note the level in the overflow tank to see if it drops over time. Leaks can be external anywhere in the coolant system-engine, radiator, hoses, heater core- or internal in the engine-head gasket failures can cause coolant in the cylinders (white smoke out the exhaust), or coolant in the oil (oil will have a milky brown look to it), or oil in the coolant (will see traces of oil in the radiator).
A couple of tests may be called for. A pressure test of the coolant system will check if the system holds pressure as it should-about 15 psi. If pressure does not hold, there is a leak somewhere. Water pumps usually leak through the weep hole when they fail. A radiator leak would show up when pressure is applied. If pressure does hold, check if you have a good radiator cap-the cap is what seals the system so pressure will maintain. Coolant under pressure raises it's boiling point by about 10 degrees, so is critical to keep the system under pressure.
If you suspect further problems-losing coolant or continued overheating-then have the chemical test done to check for exhaust gasses in the coolant. Basically a check if the head gasket is good, a simple test done at the radiator cap opening with a special fluid that changes color if hydrocarbons are present in the cooling system.
Or you could have a compression test of the cylinders to check the internal mechanical condition-not only tells you if head gasket is good, also tells you a lot about engine condition-even,. balanced, good compression in all cylinders translates into good power output-rings are good, valves are sealing good, all systems go.
The cooling system: water pump, thermostat, radiator, hoses, heater core and hoses, radiator cap, overflow tank, and the cooling fans and associated wiring. Make sure everything is working right and you'll be good to go.

Sep 17, 2013 | 1994 Toyota Camry

2 Answers

Losing water causing overheating


My first question is make model and year.
Second, are you saying the engine is boiling over into the overflow tank and onto the ground ? Is the tank about half full when the engine is cold ?
Have you run the engine with the thermostat removed to test ?
Usually when you can hear the coolant moving around, you have air in the system and it is not full of liquid coolant.

Feb 04, 2013 | Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

The car was overheating i checked all hoses and replaced the thermostat the radiator it still is ovrheating and the water is boiling in the overflow tank


Answer could be a faulty thermostat,or it could be a sign that your head gasket is about to blow ,or last of all your timing could be out of sync.

Answer 2 from Inventus: It means your cooling system is funtioning properly. In a system having a coolant recovery tank, coolant in the radiator is always up to the brim, hot or cold. There is negligible or no air space. When coolant in the radiator expands sufficiently due to warming from the engine, it will squeeze past the pressure cap's bottom seal and flow into the recovery tank. (If no provision for such expansion was present, the expansion would rupture the radiator or your hoses.) Only coolant within the radiator is under pressure, and because of this pressure (together with the elevated boiling point that the "anti-freeze" permits), it normally does not boil. But once past the pressure cap's bottom seal, the overflow is at atmospheric pressure and therefore boils.
This boiling is usually unnoticed after a short, i.e., local, trip because the cooler coolant already in the recovery tank quenches it. But after some highway driving the influx of more hot overflow heats up all the coolant in the recovery tank to the (unpressurized, i.e., "natural") boiling point.
As the engine cools when shut off, the contracting coolant in the radiator sucks back coolant from the recovery tank. Fluid in the recovery tank should never be below the "full hot" or "full cold" marks, lest air be sucked in.
-- BETTER ANSWER ==
Your cooling fans are not turning on. It is not normal for your overflow tank to boil like that. It is true that your radiator is overflowing into the reserve tank, but that means yourr adiaotor is boiling. Check for blown fuses or relays for your cooling fans. IF theya re fine. run your engine for about 15 minutes and drive. When you temp level is at normal operating temp open your hood with the engine runing and see if your fans are on. If they are, then you may have a bad thermostat or a plugged radiator, or a bad water pump. If the fans are not on, get your cooling fan switch replaced if your car has one. Check your temp sending sensor

Oct 30, 2011 | Cars & Trucks

2 Answers

My car is rumming hot and the antifreeze is leaking I'm thinking it's my water pump


It could be the water pump , or something else , like a faulty thermostat. Where is the coolant leaking from ? If it is leaking from the water pump , then yes , your pump might be toast.
If the thermostat is no good , the engine will warm up to normal temp , and then overheat quite quickly. As it overheats and the coolant expands and boils , it could back up into the overflow reservoir and leak out onto the ground. You need to get someone to diagnose the problem ASAP , running your engine in an overheat condition could very quickly blow your head gasket and/or warp a cylinder head. If you can , please post a bit more info. Does it run but at a higher than normal temp. Does it only overheat when stopped in traffic etc.
Could be water pump , or thermostat , or plugged up radiator , or nonfunctioning cooling fans.

Nov 22, 2010 | Ford Taurus Cars & Trucks

1 Answer

I may have added too much coolant. After adding it, I drove for about 15 minutes. A few hours later, the tempurature gauge light came on. I check the coolant level again and there was nothing in the...


No, you can't add too much coolant. Rather, it does not hurt anything if you do. Did you add it to the radiator, or to the overflow tank?

Let it cool, then remove the radiator cap, and if needed, add coolant to the radiator. Put the cap back on, and fill the overflow tank to the "full - cold" line. Start it and run it a few minutes and look for leaks. If you find no leaks, drive it for a day or two, then let it cool and check it again. If it is down a lot (without overheating), you have a leak somewhere. If you lose enough coolant, that will make it overheat. However, if it overheats, that can cause loss of coolant, when you stop the car, you will see steam and smell coolant, and often hear it boiling.

If it overheats again, make note of when it happens: driving on the highway, or stop-and-go around town. Overheating on the highway usually indicates a clogged radiator, while in-town overheating usually indicates a bad cooling fan (you don't need the fan above about 30 MPH). A bad fan is usually the fan relay, but it can be the fan thermostat (different from the engine thermostat), or a bad fan motor.

Oct 10, 2010 | 1999 Chevrolet Malibu

2 Answers

1999 buick centry overheating overflowing the overflow


Until you get it figured out use regular water. Replace thermostat and radiator/coolant tank caps. Thermostat regulates pressure in the motor and allows radiator to cool. Caps regulate atmosperic pressure. Either or both being bad will cause you system to siphon and fail.

May 01, 2010 | 1999 Buick Century

2 Answers

1991 overheating Towncar


If car heats up quickly and overheats , the problem is the thermostat. The thermostat stays closed and traps coolant in the engine untill it reaches about 185 degrees , than the thermostat opens and allows coolant to flow to the radiator where it is cooled by airflow. ( airflow while driving is usually sufficient ) while idling , or in slow trafic , the fan keeps air moving through the rad. The heater core is strictly for heat in the winter inside the car. The thermostat is the most likely cause of the problem , and even if it was good before , the overheat / boil situation likely cooked it anyways. I am assuming the water pump is still getting turned by a belt. No water circulation by pump would cause same symptom as bad thermostat. Overflow and expansion bottles are designed several different ways on different cars , but the theory is that as the engine heats up and the coolant expands , it goes to the tank. Later , as engine cools down after being shut off , coolant contracts. Radiator is replenished by coolant returning from expansion bottle.

Jun 04, 2009 | 1991 Lincoln Town Car

2 Answers

Overheating ?


check to see if electric fans turn on in front of radiator

Jul 13, 2008 | 1996 Ford Contour

Not finding what you are looking for?
1998 Plymouth Breeze Logo

2,271 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Plymouth Experts

Marvin
Marvin

Level 3 Expert

85239 Answers

Colin Stickland
Colin Stickland

Level 3 Expert

22485 Answers

Jeffrey Turcotte
Jeffrey Turcotte

Level 3 Expert

8984 Answers

Are you a Plymouth Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...