Buick Cars & Trucks - Recent Questions, Troubleshooting & Support


Nadia: You have to pull the Left Front Wheel off and they are hiding behind the inner fender well. Here is a good 2 minute video that will show you exactly how to do it. Hope this helps you.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LL9Vq4EdzHI

Buick Cars &... | Answered Yesterday


If you remove any Control Module it will need programming. The Body Control Module (BCM) controls your immobiliser system so a replacement unit won't recognise the key or the vehicle and the security system will 'trip' to stop the car starting. I would suggest you pay a specialist to do this because if you get it wrong it'll cause a lot more (probably expensive) problems.

Buick Cars &... | Answered on Sep 24, 2020


With the power going to the blower motor, tap/hit the the blower motor to see if it will work. A lot of times the bushings wear out and loose connection to the ground. If that does not work, then check the motor plug connection to see if it has power.

Buick Cars &... | Answered on Sep 24, 2020


YOU WILL NOT LIKE THIS ANSWER BUT PERHAPS REMOVING THE WINDSHIELD IF YOU DON'T WANT TO BREAK A SIDE WINDOW

Buick Cars &... | Answered on Sep 22, 2020


You need a new body control module. Located behind the center console under the dash. It can't be re-programed and needs to replaced with a new one that is VIN specific to your car. Dont get one from the junkyard, it wont work.

2002 Buick... | Answered on Sep 21, 2020


First you must disconnect the negative terminal from the battery to isolate the electrical system. This will prevent electrical shock. Next is to locate the ignition switch settled along the steering column, and unscrew the small screws that are holding it to the column. Then place the new switch where the old switch was positioned. Start the screws to ensure the switch is properly aligned.

Buick Cars &... | Answered on Sep 20, 2020


Well hidden. See the videos

https://www.google.com/search?safe=off&rlz=1C1QJDB_enCA643CA644&sxsrf=ALeKk025TeXBtuTCwcMPOkV5HPO_7F0JXw%3A1600032452197&ei=xI5eX82qC4KltQaC5bP4Dw&q=95+buick+roadmaster+replace+thermostatAySAQM5LjiYAQCgAQGqAQdnd3Mtd2l6yAEIwAEB&sclient=psy-ab

Buick Cars &... | Answered on Sep 13, 2020


front of engine lower facing radiator, comes out from bottom of car

Buick Cars &... | Answered on Sep 13, 2020


Is it possible the water is actually coming from the A/C evaporator case, whose DRAIN IS CLOGGED ? The water produced by the A/C then leaks out of the case, down under the carpeting, then depending how vehicle is parked, can flow to the rear floors and carpet. Hope this helps

2005 Buick... | Answered on Sep 12, 2020


Check your fuses underneath the drivers side steering wheel. Flip the plastic cover over and there will be a diagram showing the fuse that controls the taillights/stoplamp. Pull the fuse out and replace it with the same number fuse and your taillights and brake lights will work again. If the fuses are ok, pull each taillight bulb out and replace it with a new bulb. Sometimes when one light bulb fails, all of them will fail.

Buick Park... | Answered on Sep 05, 2020


most likely a wires about to break in the circuit

Buick Cars &... | Answered on Sep 05, 2020


Here is a video on how to change the p/s pump.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-T8Kek90qAA

Buick Cars &... | Answered on Sep 04, 2020


The way to fix it correctly would be to purchase a new ignition lock tumbler and have a lock smith re pin it to the factory key. The other way around it is to bypass the passlock system. Find yourself a local audio store that installs remote start systems. They should be able to get you past it.

Buick Cars &... | Answered on Sep 01, 2020


3.6L V6 Buick Lacrosse (Allure) CXS, 2006: The usual place for the power steering pressure hose to leak copious amounts of fluid is at the pump-end fitting. Don't bother trying to replace the teflon seal on the outside of it in an attempt to stop the leak. This fitting has a hidden internal seal that is designed to allow the metal part of the hose to float in the fitting even after the fitting is properly tightened. The only lasting repair is to replace the hose. On the 3.6 engine, this job is more difficult than average because the hose is a long multi-segment affair that wraps all around the subframe. Some pro shops are even hesitant to take it on, possibly because of poor GM instructions. It takes about 3 hours of labor, unless you have done it before. GM's removal and installation instructions are misleading and confusing; some might say just plain erroneous. They presume a GM hose is being installed, which apparently is not like the original hose, and that requires additional parts and effort. The solution is to install an aftermarket hose such as Edelmann PN 92226; the brand you choose really does not matter, they are all the same. The GM procedure also calls for removing motor mount bolts and lifting the engine. I found that to be unnecessary.

Remove the right side wheel and splash shield, which is held on by three plastic push pins. Undo the two steering rack heat shield snaps, using needle nose pliers to reach into the small space, and remove the shield . Take lots of pictures to remind yourself how the hose is routed around the subframe. You may ask yourself how it can possibly be removed; I know I did. Disconnect both ends of the hose. The pump end is best reached with a stubby length 18mm wrench. Despite appearing to be tight in there, the rack end is easy to loosen with a regular 18 mm open end wrench. The 18mm fitting you want to loosen is the one closest to the firewall. Very important: unhook and remove all of the plastic clips than hold the hose assembly in place, unhook the clips that retain a wire bundle to the assembly, and slide off all of the protective sheathings and cushion rings. From underneath, pull the pump end of the hose down under the subframe, and let it hang there. This will allow the metal sections of the hose to start to come away from the subframe rails. Begin to work the rack end of the hose outward toward the wheel well; it is tight in there, the end of the hose has a convoluted metal section, and and at first it may seem impossible to get that past the exhaust down pipe and out using the small space between the rack and the engine block, with the metal section of the return hose also getting in your way. Don't give up; it just takes patience. As the hose assembly comes out into the wheel well, you will be able to gradually turn the metal mid-section of the hose and feed it under the A/C compressor. You are basically turning the whole hose assembly counterclockwise (as viewed from above) in a series of steps until it is out. Eventually, with careful twisting and turning, it will come out. The key is to use the clear space under the A/C compressor and forward to the radiator to maneuver it. With the old hose on the floor under the car, study how it is laid out, and what sections lay along what parts of the subframe. Put the new hose on the floor, and orient it exactly the same. Follow the instructions that came with the new hose to install the included o-ring on the flare fitting at the rack end. I like to shrink a piece of heat-shrink tubing onto the metal flare to protect the o-ring from cuts as it's stretch over it. Once the o-ring is in place, pull the heat-shrink off and discard it. Protect the hose fittings with caps or tape to keep them clean while feeding the hose into position. Starting at the rack end fitting, begin feeding the hose: From under the car, find the gap that's underneath the A/C compressor, between the front of the engine block and the front aluminum subframe cross rail. Feed the hose out toward the wheel well through that gap. Once you get the convoluted metal end piece through there, you can start to turn and maneuver the hose assembly clockwise. Going a little at the time, it can be worked into place, basically following the reverse of the removal. Maybe it's learning curve, but for me the new one went in better than the old once came out. Verify the the o-ring is still on the rack-end fitting, lube it with ATF, and hand start the threads into the rack until you are sure it is threading in properly, and it is not cross-threaded. Tighten it to no more that 20 lb-ft. The pump end fitting already has a white teflon seal on the outside, so all you need to do is lube it, start the threads by hand, and tighten it securely. . I hope this is write-up is helpful. Good luck with the repair!

2005 Buick... | Answered on Aug 31, 2020


Not sure about the winding (whining?) sound but it isn't often an O2 sensor causes trouble - mostly it is other stuff causing the O2 sensor problems.
Considering the age of the vehicle the possibility of bad injector spray patterns or dribbling injectors should not be overlooked.

A bad injector can spray fuel droplets so large they don't burn properly and pass into the exhaust still burning or unburned and the O2 sensor sees a lean mixture and the system tries to compensate, worsening the situation and stressing both the sensor(s) and the CAT.
It would be wise to check the fuel pressures/delivery volume and injectors before doing anything else.

Buick Cars &... | Answered on Aug 29, 2020


If I remember correctly, the tensioner comes with the bolt already installed. It may not be removeable or could just be ceased in the bearing. To be on the safe side, if a new tensioner does not come with the bolt, buy a new bolt with it instead.

Buick Cars &... | Answered on Aug 29, 2020

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