Yamaha Music - Recent Questions, Troubleshooting & Support


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Yamaha Music | Answered on Sep 15, 2018


My keyboard yamaha psr2000,so I want parts silicone rubber keypad 61 and including electronic board,thank you.

Yamaha Full-Size... | Answered on Aug 16, 2018


rubber contact strip requires replacement

Yamaha NP 30 76... | Answered on Aug 08, 2018


Check output via headhones - if that works try connecting outputs to amplifier i if that works.
Hold down highest sounding key whilst turning on, this initiates a factory reset. If still no sound open up check speakers are connected, if still no sound then suspect the amplifier has failed.

Yamaha Music | Answered on Aug 07, 2018


Hold down top C key whilst turning, this initiates a factory reset so any settings you have made resulting in the smear should be returned to normal.

Yamaha Full-Size... | Answered on Aug 07, 2018


Look for any drag of the key to the case or adjacent keys. Beyond that, the silicone rubber contact dome probably is damaged and needs replacing. Unit has to be opened and serviced. Parts are pprobably available from YamahaAmerica in CA.

Yamaha Music | Answered on Jul 28, 2018


Yamaha dealers always have service centers in their locality and can provide. Also try cannibalizing. temporary solution - use a hot iron and join the broken keys.

Yamaha Portable... | Answered on Jul 28, 2018


This is a common problem with Yamaha keyboards. The problem is caused by worn-out rubber contacts in the keyboard assembly. In my old Clavinova CLP-500, there was one long rubber contact strip under the keys with two parallel strips of semiconductor material. The Clavinova circuitry determines key velocity by measuring the timing between when the key hits the first and second strips of semiconductor material. The harder you play a key, the less time it takes the key to hit the second semiconductor strip after hitting the first.
After years of playing the keyboard, the keys eventually cause tears in the semiconductor material and this messes up the timing measurement for key velocity. The only solution is to take the keyboard apart and replace the rubber contact strip with a new one.
I got rid of my CLP-500 four or five years ago and got a new CLP-170. The CLP-170 is now having exactly the same problem that the CLP-500 had. Yamaha has re-designed the rubber contacts in the CLP-170 so that there are now eight individual contact strips instead of one long one. The problem is essentially the same, though. You have to take the keyboard apart and replace the worn out rubber contacts.
Here are the part numbers for the rubber contacts that need to be replaced in the CLP-170: V8286600 Rubber Contact, 12 keys, D-C#   Qty. 6 V8286800 Rubber Contact, 11 keys, A-C#   Qty. 1 V8286700 Rubber Contact, 5 keys, D-C   Qty. 1
I suggest you also get a copy of the CLP-170 service manual, part number 001677. It has descriptions of all the steps necessary to take the thing apart and put it back together again. You'll also need a "rod" (which is just a long dowel), part number TX000670. Before you take the circuit boards off the keyboard assembly, you have to insert the dowel between the keys and the frame to keep the keys from falling back and getting in your way. A 5-foot long 1/4-inch dowel will probably work. (I haven't yet taken apart my CLP-170, and I don't have Yamaha's "rod," so I'm not sure if 1/4 inch is the right size or not. I'll report back here if it's not.)
Good luck, Howard

Yamaha Full-Size... | Answered on Jul 28, 2018


Go to Yamaha America by phone in California: (888)-892-6242 ask for "parts" Have your model number and serial number ready and which keys are bad. I assume you are talking the keys are showing mechanical damage, as an electrical problem like contacts requires different parts to repair.

Yamaha Music | Answered on Jul 28, 2018


You didn't describe your problem with enough details. If the keys operate mechanically, then the problem might be with the integrated switch assembly. You will need to disassemble the entire case enclosure to check the key assemblies. The keys are assembled into sets. You can remove the set with the bad switches and replace the entire group. In some Yamaha models you can replace individual switches ( entire key mechanism). You can also test the switches using a multimeter - simple continuity test.
If your keys are inoperable mechanically, ( won't move or move partially) you will have to disassemble the entire unit to identfy the problem. It may be a simple alignment adjustment or a broken pivot joint. You won't know for sure without removing the internals by taking it apart.
Yamaha has excellent service reps (factory trained) either in repair depots or available for house calls. Go to their web site enter your zip code to find the nearest rep. If you are not comfortable taking the keyboard apart, that is the best solution.

Yamaha P90... | Answered on Jul 28, 2018

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