Vermeer Heavy Machinery - Recent Questions, Troubleshooting & Support


Loosen the fitting at the hydraulic cylinder, start unit loosen fitting bleed till no air comes out.

Vermeer V1150... | Answered on Nov 20, 2017


You' Best Manuals l definitely find it here

Vermeer BC1000XL | Answered on Nov 09, 2017


Best Manuals Guess you should try one of these ebooks. It's very helpful, I use it too

Vermeer V1150... | Answered on Nov 09, 2017


Check the starter and solenoid.

Vermeer Bc625a... | Answered on Sep 27, 2017


Hello Chuck Treeguy, this is kind of an old trick but it's still very effective. When you have an internal bearing race that is being stubborn and not wanting to come out, or you don't have the correct puller, you can run a weld bead on the internal bearing surface of the race and as it cools it will shrink and fall out in most cases (this is only for the removal of bearings that you aren't trying to save for future use).

the welding process can be any of them except for possibly oxy-acet due to the peripheral heating of the area, GTAW, SMAW, GMAW, or FCAW will all work. You do need to consider how weld spatter can impact the area surrounding the bearing pocket.

For sensitive areas GTAW will work the best without causing damage from spatter contamination. You also have to take great care with where you place the ground as improper grounding can cause damage to other bearings that may be part of the system or to other machined surfaces.


For shaft mounted bearings that have failed and require removal, whether they be ball or roller bearing types there is another method which can be employed for their removal. First remove the cage assembly and balls or rollers leaving just the hardened race, when removing the cage assembly you can use an oxy-acetylene torch or any other number of methods.

Take care to avoid contamination to any other parts of the assembly (common sense dictates if this method can be employed for the removal process).

When the race is the only thing left on the shaft, use your oxy-acetylene or oxy-fuel torch and a neutral flame to heat only the race, as the race heats up bring the angle of the torch to a point to where it is almost flat to the surface of the bearing and slowly open up the oxygen adjusting valve on the torch to cause the flame to become oxidizing (do not depress the cutting lever), as you do this you will notice the flame will start to push the material on the surface of the bearing race, at this point stop opening the valve and use the force of this flame setting to reduce the thickness of the bearing race by tipping the angle of the torch tip into the bearing surface and moving side to side slightly as you push ahead.


You do not need to completely penetrate through the bearing race and really prefer not to. Once you have reduced the thickness of the race to around 1/16" across the width of the race, stop the process. Allow the race to cool some and then give it a sharp rap with a hammer being careful not to strike the shaft or other surfaces.


In most cases, this will cause the race to fracture and will allow it to be slipped off of the shaft.


BE SURE TO USE PROPER EYE PROTECTION AT ALL TIMES WHEN ATTEMPTING THIS PROCESS!

I would also suggest practicing this method on some scrap bearing applications before actually using it on something that really matters. Good luck!.

Hello Chuck Treeguy, this is kind of an old trick but it's still very effective. When you have an internal bearing race that is being stubborn and not wanting to come out, or you don't have the correct puller, you can run a weld bead on the internal bearing surface of the race and as it cools it will shrink and fall out in most cases (this is only for the removal of bearings that you aren't trying to save for future use).

the welding process can be any of them except for possibly oxy-acet due to the peripheral heating of the area, GTAW, SMAW, GMAW, or FCAW will all work. You do need to consider how weld spatter can impact the area surrounding the bearing pocket.

For sensitive areas GTAW will work the best without causing damage from spatter contamination. You also have to take great care with where you place the ground as improper grounding can cause damage to other bearings that may be part of the system or to other machined surfaces.


For shaft mounted bearings that have failed and require removal, whether they be ball or roller bearing types there is another method which can be employed for their removal. First remove the cage assembly and balls or rollers leaving just the hardened race, when removing the cage assembly you can use an oxy-acetylene torch or any other number of methods.

Take care to avoid contamination to any other parts of the assembly (common sense dictates if this method can be employed for the removal process).

When the race is the only thing left on the shaft, use your oxy-acetylene or oxy-fuel torch and a neutral flame to heat only the race, as the race heats up bring the angle of the torch to a point to where it is almost flat to the surface of the bearing and slowly open up the oxygen adjusting valve on the torch to cause the flame to become oxidizing (do not depress the cutting lever), as you do this you will notice the flame will start to push the material on the surface of the bearing race, at this point stop opening the valve and use the force of this flame setting to reduce the thickness of the bearing race by tipping the angle of the torch tip into the bearing surface and moving side to side slightly as you push ahead.


You do not need to completely penetrate through the bearing race and really prefer not to. Once you have reduced the thickness of the race to around 1/16" across the width of the race, stop the process. Allow the race to cool some and then give it a sharp rap with a hammer being careful not to strike the shaft or other surfaces.


In most cases, this will cause the race to fracture and will allow it to be slipped off of the shaft.


BE SURE TO USE PROPER EYE PROTECTION AT ALL TIMES WHEN ATTEMPTING THIS PROCESS!

I would also suggest practicing this method on some scrap bearing applications before actually using it on something that really matters. Good luck!.


Source: Boxer Equipment Price List 2017
?

Vermeer 625 | Answered on Aug 30, 2017


call cummins service center for the correct oil to use in cummins engines
the details will be in the user manual or service manual for the machine

Vermeer BC1000XL | Answered on Oct 29, 2016

BC1000XL Manual

Vermeer BC1000XL | Uploaded on Oct 04, 2016


Hi it looks like i had the same problem with my 252 and we replace the wire harness and got the problem fix.

Vermeer Sc 252... | Answered on May 31, 2016


Have you locked both diff pins in on the wheels or are they disengaged.?

Vermeer 2006... | Answered on May 28, 2016


My bc1000xl was doing the same thing all gauges working fine engine kept cutting out about every 2-3 minutes found water temp sensor wire that goes to the computer and disconected it. Problem fixed but get a new sensor as soon as possible in case of a real overheat

Vermeer BC1000XL | Answered on Apr 09, 2016


The fuel tank cap vent hole could be plugged.

Vermeer 2006... | Answered on Oct 30, 2015


The first thing I would do is remove the spark plug.

Vermeer BC625... | Answered on Oct 30, 2015


The adjustment may be to maximum, renew belt

Vermeer BC1000XL | Answered on Feb 02, 2015


Find the serial number and model number. Give Vemeer a call and they will be able to give you the part numbers. Probably give you a schematic as well.

Vermeer V1150... | Answered on Jul 16, 2014

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