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91.125 base on a 8 x8xx8 block.1block is equal to 512 cubic inches. 1 yard is 36 x3 x36 = 46656 cubic inches. 46656/512 = 91.125

Homework | Answered on Mar 31, 2018


Make and model of motorcycle will get you an answer.

Homework | Answered on Mar 31, 2018


Kick the ball in the direction of the goal posts.

Homework | Answered on Mar 31, 2018


The Colgate-Palmolive Company is an American worldwide consumer products company focused on the production, distribution and provision of household, health care and personal care products. Under its "Hill's Pet Nutrition" brand, it is also a manufacturer of veterinary products. The company's corporate offices are on Park Avenue in Midtown Manhattan, New York City.


Environmental record

Products of the Colgate-Palmolive company, specifically "Total" brand toothpaste contain triclosan. This ingredient has a questionable impact on waterways and marine life.
Colgate consumes approximately 0.2% of the combined palm oil output of Malaysia, Indonesia and Thailand,[20] the cultivation of which is known for environmental impacts on a global level including: deforestation, loss of natural habitats of critically endangered species, and increased greenhouse gas emissions.
Colgate-Palmolive, as a successor to The Mennen Company, is one of about 300 companies held potentially responsible for hazardous waste at the Chemsol federal Superfund site in Piscataway, New Jersey.[21] Their involvement in this site may have contributed to the contamination of an estimated 18,500 cubic yards (14,100 m3) of soil with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), PCBs, and lead off-site. A proposed $23 million agreement with the government and state of New Jersey would require Colgate-Palmolive and the other involved companies to pay for the cleanup of this hazardous waste that is contaminating the soil as well as the groundwater.[22] The company completed a LEED Silver certified manufacturing plant in Morristown, Tennessee, in March 2008 which was the first of its kind in the U.S. The new LEED silver certified plant in Tennessee produces the Colgate Total toothpaste.[23]
Colgate Palmolive received the 2012 Safe-in-Sound Excellence in Hearing Loss Prevention Award.[24]

Anti-competitive practices[edit]

Colgate Palmolive was fined by Autorit? de la concurrence in France in 2016 for price-fixing on personal hygiene products.[25]

Presence in Japan[edit]

In November 2016, Hill's-Colgate (Japan) Ltd. announced it will change its name to Colgate-Palmolive Japan Ltd. in 2017. In early 2018, C-P announced it is building an assembly plant in Japan. It is due to open in 2019, the 50,000 square feet facility will be inaugurated while 50,000 jobs or addition install 150 robots annually, producing Colgate toothpaste and toothbrush models. The company will entering the Japanese market in late 2018, replacing the retaining "Hill's-Colgate (Japan) Ltd.".
It will be the largest Colgate-Palmolive's manufacturing facility in volume, after China.
Daiichi Sekken Co., Ltd., a Japanese company, will manufacture some Palmolive products at its Izumi plant in late 2018.

SOURCE:
Colgate Palmolive

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Homework | Answered on Mar 30, 2018


The TCP/IP model distinguishes 4 levels.

I don't think there could be an advantage mixing up the bottom levels with the top ones as they have different functionalities.

How could you explain the Network or the Transport layer mixing it up with the physical or Data Link layer?

It doesn't make much sense to me because one thing is having data moving through the cables as electric signals, other is transmitting this data over a network between two computers in terms of frames or packets, as this implies encapsulation, error checking, flow control, etc.


SOURCE: https://www.quora.com/What-are-some-advantages-and-disadvantages-of-combining-the-session-presentation-and-application-layers-in-the-OSI-model-into-one-single-application-layer-in-the-Internet-model

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Homework | Answered on Mar 29, 2018


Typically, eCommerce business models can be divided into six major types, such as:
  • Business-to-Business (B2B)
  • Business-to-Consumer (B2C)
  • Consumer-to-Consumer (C2C)
  • Consumer-to-Business (C2B)
  • Business-to-Administration (B2A)
  • Consumer-to-Administration (C2A)
SORCE: Types of eCommerce Business Models Pros and Cons KartRocket

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Homework | Answered on Mar 29, 2018


SOURCE:

IT-information technology is one of the fastest developing branches of technology. It has become an important part of our every-day lives and doing serious business has become impossible without using IT. The question on everybody's lips is: is it really improving workers' productivity? Basics: IT is the area of managing technology and spans wide variety of areas that include but are not limited to things such as processes, computer software, information systems, computer hardware, programming languages, and data constructs. In short, anything that renders data, information or perceived knowledge in any visual format whatsoever, via any multimedia distribution mechanism, is considered part of the IT domain. IT provides businesses with four sets of core services to help execute the business strategy: business process automation, providing information, connecting with customers, and productivity tools.[1] Productivity is a measure of the efficiency of production. Productivity is a ratio of what is produced to what is required to produce it. Usually this ratio is in the form of an average, expressing the total output divided by the total input. Productivity is a measure of output from a production process, per unit of input.[2] The impact of information technology on work life has been one of the most talked about issues over the recent years. Chief executive officers spending millions of dollars on information technology face the critical issue of assessing the impact of this technology on work. Information system managers are increasingly required to justify technology investment in terms of its impact on the individual and his/her work. Measures of impact of information technology have narrowly focused on productivity impacts. This study uses a broader concept that is based on the impact of technology on the nature of work literature. This literature recognizes the multiple impacts of technology on work at the level of the individual. A review of the literature enabled us to generate thirty-nine items that were grouped into four constructs. In a pilot study, these constructs were assessed by observers in structured interviews with eighty-nine users to provide a criterion measure. Next, the users completed the thirty-nine item questionnaire. The unidimensionality, internal consistency and criterion-related validity of each construct were assessed. The pilot results suggest a four factor 12-item instrument that measures how extensively information technology applications impact task productivity, task innovation, customer satisfaction and management control. In a large scale study, a sample of 409 respondents was gathered to further explore this 12-item instrument and its relationships with other constructs (user involvement, user satisfaction, system usage). The results support the four factor model. Evidence of reliability and construct validity is presented for the hypothesized measurement model and future research is discussed.[3] For over a decade, empirical studies in the information technology (IT) value literature have examined the impact of technology investments on various measures of performance. However, the results of these studies, especially those examining the contribution of IT to productivity, have been mixed. One reason for these mixed empirical findings may be that these studies have not effectively accounted for the impact of technology investments that increase production efficiency and improve product quality on firm productivity. In particular, it is commonly assumed that such investments should lead to gains in both profits and productivity. However, using a closed-form analytical model we challenge this underlying assumption and demonstrate that investments in certain efficiency-enhancing technologies may be expected to decrease the productivity of profit-maximizing firms. More specifically, we demonstrate that investments in technologies that reduce the firm's fixed overhead costs do not affect the firm's product quality and pricing decisions but do increase profits and improve productivity. In addition, we demonstrate that investments in technologies that reduce the variable costs of designing, developing, and manufacturing a product encourage the firm to improve product quality and to charge a higher price. Although this adjustment helps the firm to capture higher profits, we show that it will also increase total production costs and will, under a range of conditions, decrease firm productivity. Finally, we show that the direction of firm productivity following such investments depends upon the relationship between the fixed costs of the firm and the size of the market.[4] 257 studies met the inclusion criteria. Most studies addressed decision support systems or electronic health records. Approximately 25% of the studies were from 4 academic institutions that implemented internally developed systems; only 9 studies evaluated multifunctional, commercially developed systems. Three major benefits on quality were demonstrated: increased adherence to guideline-based care, enhanced surveillance and monitoring, and decreased medication errors. The primary domain of improvement was preventive health. The major efficiency benefit shown was decreased utilization of care. Data on another efficiency measure, time utilization, were mixed. Empirical cost data were limited. Four benchmark institutions have demonstrated the efficacy of health information technologies in improving quality and efficiency. Whether and how other institutions can achieve similar benefits, and at what costs, are unclear.[5] As more information technology (IT) is deployed in organizations, it is important to understand its impact on individual performance and organizational productivity. Most past research has concentrated on identifying determinants of computer acceptance. This may be inadequate in determining the value and return on investment due to IT. Organizations are able to deploy IT more effectively if the consequences of its acceptance are obviously valuable. This study seeks to investigate the implications and consequences of IT acceptance by examining the relationships between IT acceptance and its impact on the individual user. The research model involves three components: user satisfaction, system usage, and individual impact. It is hypothesized that user satisfaction and system usage affect individual impact and that usage partially mediates the effect of satisfaction on individual impact. A comprehensive questionnaire on computer acceptance was used to collect data from 625 employees of a large organization in Singapore. The results suggest that user satisfaction is an important factor affecting system usage and that user satisfaction has the strongest direct effect on individual impact. The results also demonstrate the importance of system usage in mediating the relationship of user satisfaction on individual impact.[6] Based on previous empirical research, there seems to be little relation between investment in information technology (IT) and financial performance (often referred to as the `productivity paradox'). We hypothesize that this is due to the fact that many companies implement IT projects ineffectively. Like any other asset, IT must be utilized effectively to result in increased financial performance. By comparing successful users of IT and less successful users of IT, we show that successful users of IT have superior financial performance relative to less successful users of IT. However, any financial performance advantage is short-lived, possibly due to the ability of competitors to copy IT projects.[7] Technology products are a means to an end, not an end in themselves. When thinking about your IT needs, always begin by thinking about your strategy and business goals. Ask: how can I improve my business? Where can I get the jump on competitors? What are my biggest costs and where would I benefit most from efficiency gains? Remember that IT can be a powerful source of competitive advantage. Do with IT what your competitors can't, and customers will take note. Only once you've decided exactly what it is that your businesses wants to achieve with technology, should you start looking for the solutions themselves.


Information technology and its impact on productivity Australian Science


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Homework | Answered on Mar 29, 2018


Since 1900, America and Americans have experienced tremendous changes in both the makeup of the population and in how people live their lives, according to the U.S. Census Bureau.
In 1900, most people living in the United States were male, under 23 years old, lived in the country and rented their homes. Almost half of all the people in the U.S. lived in households with five or more other people.
Today, most people in the U.S. are female, 35 years old or older, live in metropolitan areas and own their own home. Most people in the U.S. now either live alone or in households with no more than one or two other people.
These are just the top-level changes reported by the Census Bureau in their 2000 report titled Demographic Trends in the 20th Century. Released during the bureau's 100th anniversary year, the report tracks trends in population, housing and household data for the nation, regions and states.
"Our goal was to produce a publication that appeals to people interested in the demographic changes that shaped our nation in the 20th century and to those interested in the numbers underlying those trends," said Frank Hobbs, who co-authored the report with Nicole Stoops. "We hope it will serve as a valuable reference work for years to come."

Some highlights of the report include:

Population Size and Geographic Distribution

  • The U.S. population grew by more than 205 million people during the century, more than tripling from 76 million in 1900 to 281 million in 2000.
  • As the population grew, the geographical population center shifted 324 miles west and 101 miles south, from Bartholomew County, Indiana, in 1900 to its current location in Phelps County, Missouri.
  • In every decade of the century, the population of the Western states grew faster than the populations of the other three regions.
  • Florida's population rank rose more than that of any other state, catapulting it from 33rd to 4th place in state rankings. Iowa's population ranking dropped the furthest, from 10th in the nation in 1900 to 30th in 2000.

Age

  • Children under 5 years old represented the largest five-year age group in 1900 and again in 1950; but in 2000 the largest groups were 35 to 39 and 40 to 44.
  • The percentage of the U.S. population age 65 and over increased in every censusfrom 1900 (4.1 percent) to 1990 (12.6 percent), then declined for the first time in Census 2000 to 12.4 percent.
  • From 1900 to 1960, the South had the highest proportion of children under 15 and the lowest proportion of people 65 and over, making it the country's "youngest" region. The West grabbed that title in the latter part of the century.

Race and Hispanic Origin

  • At the beginning of the century, only 1-in-8 U.S. residents were of a race other than white; by the end of the century, the ratio was 1-in-4.
  • The black population remained concentrated in the South, and the Asian and Pacific Islander population in the West through the century, but these regional concentrations declined sharply by 2000.
  • From 1980 to 2000, the Hispanic-origin population, which may be of any race, more than doubled.
  • The total minority population people of Hispanic origin or of races other than white increased by 88 percent between 1980 and 2000 while the non-Hispanic white population grew by only 7.9 percent.

Housing and Household Size

  • In 1950, for the first time, more than half of all occupied housing units were owned instead of rented. The homeownership rate increased until 1980, decreased slightly in the 1980s and then rose again to its highest level of the century in 2000 reaching 66 percent.
  • The 1930s was the only decade when the proportion of owner-occupied housing units declined in every region. The largest increase in homeownership rates for each region then occurred in the next decade when the economy recovered from the Depression and experienced post-World War II prosperity.
  • Between 1950 and 2000, married-couple households declined from more than three-fourths of all households to just over one-half.
  • The proportional share of one-person households increased more than households of any other size. In 1950, one-person households represented 1-in-10 households; by 2000, they comprised 1-in-4.
For more reference see https://www.thoughtco.com/census-bureau-reports-100-years-in-america-4051546

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Homework | Answered on Mar 29, 2018


What is causing climate change? Geological records stretching back millions of years indicate a number of large variations in Earth's past climate. These have been caused by many natural factors, including changes in the sun, volcanoes, Earth's orbit and CO2 levels.
However, comprehensive assessment by scientists shows that it is extremely likely that human activity has been the dominant cause of warming since the mid-20th Century.
Greenhouse gas emissions Evidence that CO2 emissions are the cause of global warming is very robust. Scientists have known since the early 1800s that greenhouse gases in the atmosphere trap heat.
Global CO2 emissions from human activity have increased by over 400% since 1950. As a result, the concentration of CO2 in the air has reached more than 400 parts per million by volume (ppm), compared to about 280ppm in 1750 (around the start of the Industrial Revolution).
The Earth's natural climate cycle Over the last 800,000 years, there have been natural cycles in the Earth's climate, between ice ages and warmer interglacial periods. After the last ice age 20,000 years ago, average global temperature rose by about 3°C to 8°C, over a period of about 10,000 years.
We can link the rises in temperature over the last 200 years to rises in atmospheric CO2 levels. Greenhouse gas levels are now well above the natural cycle of the last 800,000 years.
Solar influences The sun is the primary source of Earth's heat, so relatively small changes in solar output can affect our climate.
Satellite observations since the late 1970s have shown a slight decrease in the sun's total energy output. However, instead of cooling, the Earth has warmed over this period.
Also, warming from the sun would heat all of the atmosphere, including the lowest few kilometres (the troposphere) and the layer above (the stratosphere). Observations show that the stratosphere is in fact cooling while the troposphere warms. This is consistent with greenhouse gas heating and not solar heating.


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Homework | Answered on Mar 29, 2018


The term sociological imagination was coined by the American sociologist C. Wright Mills in 1959 to describe the type of insight offered by the discipline of sociology . The term is used in introductory textbooks in sociology to explain the nature of sociology and its relevance in daily life.

Sociological imagination is not a theory but an outlook of society which tries to steer us into thinking away from one's usual day-to-day life and look at one's life afresh. Specifically, the sociological imagination involves an individual developing a deep understanding of how their biography is a result of historical process and occurs within a larger social context.
Sociological imagination: The application of imaginative thought to the asking and answering of sociological questions. Someone using the sociological imagination "thinks himself away" from the familiar routines of daily life. For Assignment Help and services in Sociological Imagination visit :

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Homework | Answered on Mar 29, 2018


search conversion tables on Google

Homework | Answered on Mar 29, 2018


In physics, power is the rate of doing work, the amount of energy transferred per unit time. Having no direction, it is a scalar quantity.

In SI base units: kg?m2?s?3
Derivations from other quantities: P = E/t; P = F·v; P = V·I
SI unit: Megawatt

Reference - Physics Tutor

Homework | Answered on Mar 29, 2018

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