Aircrafts - Page 6 - Recent Questions, Troubleshooting & Support


It shouldn't make much difference if the questions have changed because you were only practicing with questions "like" the ones in the test. By now you've taken the test. Hope you did well!

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Using the old (pre GPS) method you would use the sectional and plotter (aviation ruler) and measure the distance. Using a GPS you can usually turn on distance rings on the screen or if you have the airport selected as destination you can read it right off the screen. If it's your home base you should learn the landmarks and their distances from the airport. In the Miami area, there are so many airports and landmarks, if you're flying there, during your preflight preps you should measure out distances to some landmarks that you plan to pass over and mark them on the chart or flight log.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


In an airliner you are often cruising at 580 knots at about 35000 feet. When you look out at this altitude you are seeing (let's say) 40 miles so a car, if you can pick it out, moving at 70 mph in a 40 mile field of view isn't going to look like it's moving fast at all. By the time it has driven one mile you've flown about 12 miles and probably lost sight of the car.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Many colleges offer flight training. Two that come to mind are UND and University of Cincinnati but there are many others. You might look into that as most airlines want a degree also. Regional airlines pay is garbage but you get raises pretty quickly as your time builds.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Many of the current general aviation planes now come with a ballistic parachute from BRS.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


The safest time to fly is after such an incident because all pilots are double checking themselves to make sure it doesn't happen to them.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Go to your local airport and talk with an instructor. That doesn't cost anything and they'll be happy to answer any of your questions. You can go for a sport pilot license first because it's the quickest cheapest way to get in the air. Then if you "catch the flying bug" you can progress to a private pilot certificate.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Embry Riddle is one of the most expensive colleges you can attend for flight. There are many others such as University of Cincinnati and University of North Dakota that offer college programs in flight and aviation. Airlines do want college degrees so it's really a pretty good idea. I'd check out tuitions at other colleges that offer aviation.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


If you are flying level you climb. If it's a propeller plane and you don't add rudder to counter "P factor" you may also turn a bit.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


You may notice that wings are usually curved at the top and fairly flat on the bottom. This causes the air over the top of the wing to move faster and therefore have a lower pressure than the air under the wing. The lower pressure mixed with the high pressure under the wing cause "lift". You can demonstrate this by holding a sheet of paper at one edge and blowing over the top of it. The paper will rise as you blow due to the low pressure you're creating by the faster air flow. It's called Bernoulli's principle.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Departure controllers have blocks of airspace with altitude limits. Chances are that there was other traffic that they needed to have out of the way so they held him at 5000 before clearing him to the next controller's airspace.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


You need a college degree and then join the military or go to a military college like the USAF Academy. They will put you through all the pilot training.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Students and certificated pilots both are required to remain current and to have a check ride (flight review with an instructor) every 24 calendar months. The ones you're seeing are probably going out to the practice area to practice their flight maneuvers. If a pilot doesn't practice regularly his or her skills can deteriorate rapidly.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


They go through very intense training to be able to sequence aircraft safely. If there's a controller then there's at least a Class D area and all aircraft operating in that area must contact tower and let them know where they are and what they want to do. This is the information that lets them determine when it's clear.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Older planes are usually very good purchases, IF they have been well maintained over the years. Airplanes have to be inspected annually by an A&P mechanic with an Inspection Authorization so they are usually very well maintained. Any purchase should include having an A&P mechanic review the airframe and engine logs and evaluation of the plane, including looking at how many hours the engine has since overhaul and checking compression. I had a 1966 Cherokee 140 for several years and finally sold it when I bought my current Experimental aircraft (a BD-4). It helps a LOT if you can get an A&P license and maintain you own plane though.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


As an aircraft engineer I have deep concerns over composite and plastics used in aircraft construction. I personally don't think they can possibly last simply because repairing structural damage cannot be 100% guaranteed. Metal and wooden structures are easily repaired or replaced. Splicing and repairing plastic and composites are not so easy and expensive to do. It's often cheaper to buy a new one, which means that the aircraft will be written off rather than anyone having to guarantee any complicated repair. Metal aircraft, however, can easily be repaired given a skilled sheet metal worker and the repairs are often stronger than the original structure.
What worries me about plastic is its tendency to become brittle over time. Most of us have experienced those horrific plastic garden chairs that don't last more than a year before they break. Whilst composite aircraft are clearly of superior quality, I like to see a manufacturer who is prepared to guarantee that his composite (plastic) aircraft will not suffer the same fate over time. There was a plastic glider that broke up in the UK in the late 70s. The owner had painted a dark green band around the rear fuselage just in front of the tail. The differential heat absorption from the sun seriously weakened the area and the tail broke off in flight. No-one can tell yet what we will be confronted with in the future or what people might do to their aircraft and I predict that many will have to be retired when we find out the real lifespan when they start to fail. I personally would need a lot of convincing before I bought one.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Modern Jet airliners already have electronic screens that depict the ground, the sky, maps, terrain and many more things, They are known as "Glass Cockpit" aircraft. These aircraft can land in Zero visibility fully automatically without the pilots having to see out of the window at all, just viewing the screens. The problems are in training of the flight crews. Full automated approaches and landings are far more exacting on the flight crew than a normal visual landing and crews have to be specially trained and certified to do them. The thought that on an automatic landing the pilots just sit there and do nothing is far from reality. The procedure is one of intense concentration and if the aircraft so much a twitches the pilots will abandon the approach, they have to watch everything. Training flight crews is a very expensive business and an international operator would have to have about nine crews for just one aircraft. Training those crews to operate with just view screens would blow the training budget out the bank. No matter how cleaver these modern jets are the fastest computer on board is still the one between the pilots ears and using all his senses and especially sight through a window will be with us for some time.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


The entire weight of the aircraft is being supported by the wings. Longer wings are designed to bend upwards to support that weight. Due to the curvature of the wings (more curved on top and flatter on bottom) there is low pressure on the top of the wings and higher pressure under the wings. So the wings are actually pulled up into the air by the low pressure over the top of them.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


There are many good schools in the UK and CAE is a good one if money is no object. If you have a tight budget then you could consider some of the multitude of other training establishment, certainly up to PPL level. The downside to learning in the UK is that it can be a little slow and frustrating at times due to the inclement weather. However, don't be put off by that since you will learn significantly more about flying in the weather we have in the UK than any of the "fair weather fairies" that learnt in a climate of continual sunshine. When the time comes and you get your commercial pilot job, your new employer won't be too pleased if you told them you can only fly when the sun is shinning. learning to fly in the UK gives you a good grounding and experience that you can take with you anywhere in the world.

Aircrafts | Answered on Mar 06, 2017

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