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14 CFR 61.1 (b) (12) and (13) Definitions-Night vision goggles and operations. 14 CFR 61.31 (k) Additional training required for night vision goggle operations. 14 CFR 61.51 (k) Logging night vision goggle time. 14 CFR 61.57 (f) Night vision goggle operating experience. 14 CFR 61.57 (g) Night vision goggle proficiency check. 14 CFR 61.195 (k) Training for night vision goggle operations. 14 CFR 91.205 (h) Instrument and equipment requirements for night vision goggle operations.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


They have, plenty of videos on youtube, however it is more in the research and development stage than mass production.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


Airlines from the U.S. contract pilots based on their qualifications and the right to work in the U.S. It is ilegal to discriminate against race, ethnic background, veteran status.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


Do not understand the question, do you mean what happens when you jack up an aircraft?

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


160 is the final approach heading to runway 18. You notice that this approach does not align exactly with the runway, you make a slight right turn to land. 115deg is the outbound leg heading for a procedure turn and 295 is the return heading from the procedure turn, from which you would turn 160 on final and fly the 160 line to the missed approach point. DME is required for this approach so you would either need DME or a GPS that can supply distance information. To fly this full approach (from southerly directions) you would fly to the VOR, fly outbound at 3000' MSL on a 340 heading for about 7 miles then turn left to heading 115 for 1 minute then right turn to 295 and intercept the 340 radial, turn right to 160 and descend to 2300' by GRAMA and continue descending to 1220" at 1.6 DME from the VOR. From that point, if you have the proper visual cues you may descend below 1220' to land, if you can't see the runway environment from 1220 feet at 1.6 DME then you must stay at that altitude until you do see it or you reach the missed approach point at .3DME. There's a very real reason that an instrument rating is required for IFR flight. It takes a lot of training and practice to learn to do it right - and even then you may not have it all correct. (I may well have missed something on this approach but I haven't been IFR current in several years)

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Usually, once you have a private pilot certificate you would go for an instructor rating and work as a flight instructor to build flight time (while making money). Along the way you could also be working on your commercial, multi engine, and air transport pilot ratings and certificates. It takes time to get into the airlines, mostly because you need to build flight time and experience. Even when you first break into the airlines the pay is kind of pathetic, but it builds quickly over time.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


The cost in designing, developing, and testing an aircraft is staggering!!! Defense contractors as those you mention have extremely strict regulations to follow regarding export control and no equipment is sold to a foreign government without the express approval of the US gov't.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


English has been established by the ICAO as the universal language of aviation. It was necessary to establish one language for international flights to ensure safe and understandable communications world wide.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


You're stuck with a water landing (ditching). Hopefully at altitude the pilot can see a ship and make the landing in the vicinity of the ship for quick rescue. It so rare for a plane to lose power to all engines though that you should never hear of such an incident. Depending on the route, however, Bermuda may be within gliding distance.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Religion is completely irrelevant in determining how good a pilot may be.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


You need to visit a recruiter to find that out.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Go visit a flight school near you and talk to an instructor. Find out about getting a sport pilot certificate first because it's the cheapest way to start flying. If you have any kind of feeling that you and the instructor won't get along very well then go find a different instructor. You need one who will make it fun to learn to fly, even with all the stress involved with learning new things.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


It shouldn't make much difference if the questions have changed because you were only practicing with questions "like" the ones in the test. By now you've taken the test. Hope you did well!

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Using the old (pre GPS) method you would use the sectional and plotter (aviation ruler) and measure the distance. Using a GPS you can usually turn on distance rings on the screen or if you have the airport selected as destination you can read it right off the screen. If it's your home base you should learn the landmarks and their distances from the airport. In the Miami area, there are so many airports and landmarks, if you're flying there, during your preflight preps you should measure out distances to some landmarks that you plan to pass over and mark them on the chart or flight log.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


In an airliner you are often cruising at 580 knots at about 35000 feet. When you look out at this altitude you are seeing (let's say) 40 miles so a car, if you can pick it out, moving at 70 mph in a 40 mile field of view isn't going to look like it's moving fast at all. By the time it has driven one mile you've flown about 12 miles and probably lost sight of the car.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Many colleges offer flight training. Two that come to mind are UND and University of Cincinnati but there are many others. You might look into that as most airlines want a degree also. Regional airlines pay is garbage but you get raises pretty quickly as your time builds.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Many of the current general aviation planes now come with a ballistic parachute from BRS.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


The safest time to fly is after such an incident because all pilots are double checking themselves to make sure it doesn't happen to them.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Go to your local airport and talk with an instructor. That doesn't cost anything and they'll be happy to answer any of your questions. You can go for a sport pilot license first because it's the quickest cheapest way to get in the air. Then if you "catch the flying bug" you can progress to a private pilot certificate.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Embry Riddle is one of the most expensive colleges you can attend for flight. There are many others such as University of Cincinnati and University of North Dakota that offer college programs in flight and aviation. Airlines do want college degrees so it's really a pretty good idea. I'd check out tuitions at other colleges that offer aviation.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017

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