Aircrafts - Page 5 - Recent Questions, Troubleshooting & Support


Really depends who you think your audience is. Lay people may just want to know how a plane flys or why certain things happen on commercial flights. Pilots may want to learn about skills/ratings they havent acquired yet, recent incidents.

Aircrafts | Answered on Sep 11, 2017


There are some speed limits for certain types of airspace. Airliners are always in contact with air traffic control and in order to keep the required separation of aircraft sometimes the controllers will ask the pilot to maintain an airspeed. More than likely you experienced a slowdown while your plane was beginning an approach, During approach controllers have to maintain specific spacing between aircraft and often must slow them down behind slower aircraft. Your plane very likely was slowing down from approx 570 knots to 250 knots or less for the approach.

Aircrafts | Answered on Aug 23, 2017


The pilot of the aircraft with the compressor stalls was calling "mayday mayday mayday" then explaining his problem. The response was the tower acknowledging the mayday call and telling the pilot that he's cleared for any runway that he needs.

Aircrafts | Answered on Jul 25, 2017


Well technically you can make a ducted fan plane but it is highly inefficient as battery technology is still in its infant stages as well as batteries are still very heavy. Secondly Jet engines are basically high bypass turbines.. They can technically run on many different fuels such as diesel, kerosene, and propane.

Aircrafts | Answered on Jul 17, 2017


Here are all the answers you need. Basically you can fly without registering under certain rules outlined on this website.. https://www.faa.gov/uas/getting_started/fly_for_fun

Aircrafts | Answered on Jul 17, 2017


The demand for pilots within the next 10 years will be extremely high globally. You are correct, not many train engineer schools out there but as far as difficulty each have their bulk share of responsibilities for safe operation.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


14 CFR 61.1 (b) (12) and (13) Definitions-Night vision goggles and operations. 14 CFR 61.31 (k) Additional training required for night vision goggle operations. 14 CFR 61.51 (k) Logging night vision goggle time. 14 CFR 61.57 (f) Night vision goggle operating experience. 14 CFR 61.57 (g) Night vision goggle proficiency check. 14 CFR 61.195 (k) Training for night vision goggle operations. 14 CFR 91.205 (h) Instrument and equipment requirements for night vision goggle operations.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


They have, plenty of videos on youtube, however it is more in the research and development stage than mass production.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


Airlines from the U.S. contract pilots based on their qualifications and the right to work in the U.S. It is ilegal to discriminate against race, ethnic background, veteran status.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


Do not understand the question, do you mean what happens when you jack up an aircraft?

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


160 is the final approach heading to runway 18. You notice that this approach does not align exactly with the runway, you make a slight right turn to land. 115deg is the outbound leg heading for a procedure turn and 295 is the return heading from the procedure turn, from which you would turn 160 on final and fly the 160 line to the missed approach point. DME is required for this approach so you would either need DME or a GPS that can supply distance information. To fly this full approach (from southerly directions) you would fly to the VOR, fly outbound at 3000' MSL on a 340 heading for about 7 miles then turn left to heading 115 for 1 minute then right turn to 295 and intercept the 340 radial, turn right to 160 and descend to 2300' by GRAMA and continue descending to 1220" at 1.6 DME from the VOR. From that point, if you have the proper visual cues you may descend below 1220' to land, if you can't see the runway environment from 1220 feet at 1.6 DME then you must stay at that altitude until you do see it or you reach the missed approach point at .3DME. There's a very real reason that an instrument rating is required for IFR flight. It takes a lot of training and practice to learn to do it right - and even then you may not have it all correct. (I may well have missed something on this approach but I haven't been IFR current in several years)

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Usually, once you have a private pilot certificate you would go for an instructor rating and work as a flight instructor to build flight time (while making money). Along the way you could also be working on your commercial, multi engine, and air transport pilot ratings and certificates. It takes time to get into the airlines, mostly because you need to build flight time and experience. Even when you first break into the airlines the pay is kind of pathetic, but it builds quickly over time.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


The cost in designing, developing, and testing an aircraft is staggering!!! Defense contractors as those you mention have extremely strict regulations to follow regarding export control and no equipment is sold to a foreign government without the express approval of the US gov't.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


English has been established by the ICAO as the universal language of aviation. It was necessary to establish one language for international flights to ensure safe and understandable communications world wide.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


You're stuck with a water landing (ditching). Hopefully at altitude the pilot can see a ship and make the landing in the vicinity of the ship for quick rescue. It so rare for a plane to lose power to all engines though that you should never hear of such an incident. Depending on the route, however, Bermuda may be within gliding distance.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Religion is completely irrelevant in determining how good a pilot may be.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


You need to visit a recruiter to find that out.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Go visit a flight school near you and talk to an instructor. Find out about getting a sport pilot certificate first because it's the cheapest way to start flying. If you have any kind of feeling that you and the instructor won't get along very well then go find a different instructor. You need one who will make it fun to learn to fly, even with all the stress involved with learning new things.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


It shouldn't make much difference if the questions have changed because you were only practicing with questions "like" the ones in the test. By now you've taken the test. Hope you did well!

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Using the old (pre GPS) method you would use the sectional and plotter (aviation ruler) and measure the distance. Using a GPS you can usually turn on distance rings on the screen or if you have the airport selected as destination you can read it right off the screen. If it's your home base you should learn the landmarks and their distances from the airport. In the Miami area, there are so many airports and landmarks, if you're flying there, during your preflight preps you should measure out distances to some landmarks that you plan to pass over and mark them on the chart or flight log.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017

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