Aircrafts - Recent Questions, Troubleshooting & Support


Well technically you can make a ducted fan plane but it is highly inefficient as battery technology is still in its infant stages as well as batteries are still very heavy. Secondly Jet engines are basically high bypass turbines.. They can technically run on many different fuels such as diesel, kerosene, and propane.

Aircrafts | Answered on Jul 17, 2017


Here are all the answers you need. Basically you can fly without registering under certain rules outlined on this website.. https://www.faa.gov/uas/getting_started/fly_for_fun

Aircrafts | Answered on Jul 17, 2017


The pilot of the aircraft with the compressor stalls was calling "mayday mayday mayday" then explaining his problem. The response was the tower acknowledging the mayday call and telling the pilot that he's cleared for any runway that he needs.

Aircrafts | Answered on May 06, 2017


The demand for pilots within the next 10 years will be extremely high globally. You are correct, not many train engineer schools out there but as far as difficulty each have their bulk share of responsibilities for safe operation.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


14 CFR 61.1 (b) (12) and (13) Definitions-Night vision goggles and operations. 14 CFR 61.31 (k) Additional training required for night vision goggle operations. 14 CFR 61.51 (k) Logging night vision goggle time. 14 CFR 61.57 (f) Night vision goggle operating experience. 14 CFR 61.57 (g) Night vision goggle proficiency check. 14 CFR 61.195 (k) Training for night vision goggle operations. 14 CFR 91.205 (h) Instrument and equipment requirements for night vision goggle operations.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


They have, plenty of videos on youtube, however it is more in the research and development stage than mass production.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


Airlines from the U.S. contract pilots based on their qualifications and the right to work in the U.S. It is ilegal to discriminate against race, ethnic background, veteran status.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


Do not understand the question, do you mean what happens when you jack up an aircraft?

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 23, 2017


Technically anyone could get in and start a big jet aircraft, but it would have to be pointing in the right direction. Getting a large transport jet going is allot more complicated than just starting the engines. The whole aircraft has a multitude of systems that have to be brought on line even before the start is selected. Failure to do so would have the computers on board sulk until you said good morning to them. The first operation, thus, is to 'power-up' the aircraft, this means to establish electrical power. This can be done in two ways, one being establishing a ground power unit and secondly, the aircraft's own auxiliary power unit, which is normally a little jet engine in the tail of the aircraft. The APU as it's called (auxiliary power unit) will also supply air pressure for cabin air conditioning and to the air starter units used to spin the main engine turbines at high speed to start the main engines, when commanded to do so. This is why the air-conditioning temporarily goes off when the engines are starting, because the APU cannot supply both engine start air and conditioning air at the same time.
After electrical power has been established, the on-board computers will come to life. Some computers are in their own little world and control things that are fully automatic, you only hear from them if they detect a defect in their own self test. Other computers are in pairs and threes, they monitor each other and alert the pilots and engineers via other computers if any detects faults in the others. There are two or three inertial navigation systems that are driven by lazar light. In each unit there are at least three lazars in different orientation. These units can detect the slightest movement and calculate the position of the aircraft by adding that movement to the aircraft's current position. The IRS units are very - very clever since they measure the movement by measuring the shift in the light spectrum when the aircraft moves. Since they measure movement, they have to know the speed the world spins at and the speed of the earth through space, to deduct that from the small movement on the aircraft in order to calculate the position. Allowing the IRS units to come on line is essential and must be done before main engine start. The aircraft must be completely stationary for this to happen.
After all that has been done the main navigation computers are programed for the route to be flown and with other information. The Flight management computers (as they are called on some aircraft) can also acquire their own information, like how much fuel is on board, and in flight the airspeed of the aircraft the angle at which the aircraft is at and from that it will calculate the weight of the aircraft.
So when all the systems are up and running and the computers have done their thing and have been programmed where required we can carry out all the other checks, switch on the galley power and call for a cup of tea and when we have drunk that we are nearly ready to start the main engines.
When ready to start the main engines the air system has to be re-configured to enable the starters to operate, following that the normal procedure is to place the engine start switch in the auto start position, where all the starting functions are carried out automatically. Both pilots monitor the engine start as sometimes things can go wrong like a hung start or a hot start. These sort of malfunctions can seriously damage a multi-multi million dollar engine in a flash and no pilot would want to be responsible for that. As the engine spins up to speed, at a predetermined percentage RPM the captain will select the fuel switch to the run position which will allow the fuel to be injected into the engine for light-up. Following a normal start the air system is then reconfigured once more as part of the after start check list, along with other post start items.
All in all what I'm trying to say is that it is a complicated procedure and not just about turning a key like a car. So if you were to board a dead aircraft on the tarmac and turn the start switch nothing would happen.
So what if the engineer wanted to run an engine for an engine test, would he have to follow the same procedure? Well, apart from loading the flight data into the flight computer, he would have to do everything else, if only to prevent all sorts of warnings that would occur trying to short cut the procedure, since the only warnings he would wish to see is anything that is relevant to the engine start, otherwise engine starting and running warnings may well be disguised by other more insignificant malfunctions. Hope this has been helpful.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 15, 2017


160 is the final approach heading to runway 18. You notice that this approach does not align exactly with the runway, you make a slight right turn to land. 115deg is the outbound leg heading for a procedure turn and 295 is the return heading from the procedure turn, from which you would turn 160 on final and fly the 160 line to the missed approach point. DME is required for this approach so you would either need DME or a GPS that can supply distance information. To fly this full approach (from southerly directions) you would fly to the VOR, fly outbound at 3000' MSL on a 340 heading for about 7 miles then turn left to heading 115 for 1 minute then right turn to 295 and intercept the 340 radial, turn right to 160 and descend to 2300' by GRAMA and continue descending to 1220" at 1.6 DME from the VOR. From that point, if you have the proper visual cues you may descend below 1220' to land, if you can't see the runway environment from 1220 feet at 1.6 DME then you must stay at that altitude until you do see it or you reach the missed approach point at .3DME. There's a very real reason that an instrument rating is required for IFR flight. It takes a lot of training and practice to learn to do it right - and even then you may not have it all correct. (I may well have missed something on this approach but I haven't been IFR current in several years)

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Usually, once you have a private pilot certificate you would go for an instructor rating and work as a flight instructor to build flight time (while making money). Along the way you could also be working on your commercial, multi engine, and air transport pilot ratings and certificates. It takes time to get into the airlines, mostly because you need to build flight time and experience. Even when you first break into the airlines the pay is kind of pathetic, but it builds quickly over time.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


The cost in designing, developing, and testing an aircraft is staggering!!! Defense contractors as those you mention have extremely strict regulations to follow regarding export control and no equipment is sold to a foreign government without the express approval of the US gov't.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


There are some speed limits for certain types of airspace. Airliners are always in contact with air traffic control and in order to keep the required separation of aircraft sometimes the controllers will ask the pilot to maintain an airspeed. More than likely you experienced a slowdown while your plane was beginning an approach, During approach controllers have to maintain specific spacing between aircraft and often must slow them down behind slower aircraft. Your plane very likely was slowing down from approx 570 knots to 250 knots or less for the approach.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


English has been established by the ICAO as the universal language of aviation. It was necessary to establish one language for international flights to ensure safe and understandable communications world wide.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


You're stuck with a water landing (ditching). Hopefully at altitude the pilot can see a ship and make the landing in the vicinity of the ship for quick rescue. It so rare for a plane to lose power to all engines though that you should never hear of such an incident. Depending on the route, however, Bermuda may be within gliding distance.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Depends on the plane. Most small general aviation planes use a key. Larger planes, and commercial airliners do not. The owner of the plane keeps the key with them and in many cases is required to have a secondary locking system of some sort on the plane.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Religion is completely irrelevant in determining how good a pilot may be.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


You need to visit a recruiter to find that out.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017


Go visit a flight school near you and talk to an instructor. Find out about getting a sport pilot certificate first because it's the cheapest way to start flying. If you have any kind of feeling that you and the instructor won't get along very well then go find a different instructor. You need one who will make it fun to learn to fly, even with all the stress involved with learning new things.

Aircrafts | Answered on Apr 10, 2017

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