Question about Canon PowerShot A70 Digital Camera

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White balance settings and color temperature

Does anyone know the color temperature that corresponds to the various white balance settings (Sunlight, Cloudy, Tungsten, etc.) on the Powershot A70? Are these settings the same color temperature for all canon digital cameras? Thanks.

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Re: White balance settings and color temperature

Canon has a chart of the approximate settings they use in their manual. it states.. daylight - 5200 shade - 7000 cloudy/twilight/sunset - 6000 tungsten - 3200 white flourescent - 4000 flash - 6000

Posted on Sep 14, 2005

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In my samsung digimax 240 camera, if i take picture in the sunlight I get only some blueish colour and in side the premises I get usual picture. What shall I do to clear this problem? srikanth


This is due to the white balance setting on the camera, if available. Auto is a fine setting.
You can use a "daylight" setting outdoors and an "incandescent" setting indoors. (Sunlight is bluer than filament bulb light, which is more yellowish in color.)
If you cannot change the white balance setting on your camera, you're probably just stuck with this issue. A newer camera would deal with this difference considerably better.

Mar 09, 2011 | Samsung Digimax 240 Digital Camera

1 Answer

My Canon G11 - most indoor pics have a strong yellow-orange hue. What can I do to correct this or is the camera broken?


Light from ordinary light bulbs has a strong yellow-orange cast, which our eyes tend to adjust for without thought. Check the white balance setting on your camera. This is to adjust the camera for the color of the light, to try to make white come out white, hence the name "white balance." Set the white balance to incandescent (light-bulb icon) for indoor shooting under light bulbs, or to automatic to let the camera take its best attempt.

Try experimenting with the white balance setting. Taking pictures in bright sunlight with the incandescent setting will give your pictures a very blue cast, making things look a little colder. There are other settings, such as flourescent.

Sep 19, 2010 | Digital Cameras

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Pictures are over exposed when outside


You may have the settings wrong. Check in the MENU to see if you have it set to "inside" pics rather than outside.
Also the ISO has a lot to do with the exposure. If the iso is set too low outside sunlight pics will be white or overexposed. Try setting ISO on wheel for various options select program mode button and MENU select ISO 120 or 250. These are are pretty general settings. the flash will only engage inside or outside if the light is low ( like evening) I suspect your ISO setting is at a setting that is incompatible with bright sunlight
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Also select White Balance and move it to DAYLIGHT

take a few shots inside and out to see if there is an improvement.

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May 29, 2010 | Samsung Digimax L60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

White Balance


You can change the white balance in the "shooting menu".

Nov 11, 2009 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Best setting for indoor


There are three possible solutions for you:

1. Just use the Daylight (direct sun) white balance setting. Electronic flash is typically close to the direct sunlight setting for white balance. Advantages: it is simple. Disadvantages: if you are balancing electronic flash with ambient light, you are likely to have an odd mixture of lighting, with the ambient lighting tending toward red (if incandescent) or green (if flourescent).

2. Get a Wratten 85 color correction gel that you can cover your flash's head with, and use the Tungsten white balance setting. This will bring your flash output into line with existing incandescent light sources. Advantages: almost as simple as (1), and allows you to come close to matching a common indoor lighting situation. This will produce more natural-looking environmental shots if you balance the flash and incandescent ambient light contributions to the exposure. Disadvantages: large gel filters get expensive. You may be able to obtain something close to the Wratten 85 color correction filter from a theater supply house more cheaply. Roscolux #3408 is slightly weaker and #3411 is slightly stronger than the Wratten 85. If you have to balance flash with flourescent light sources, try a Roscolux in the cyan series leading to #4360. Some experimentation is likely to be required. The place I looked online offered the Roscolux in 20x24" sheets for about $7 per sheet, a bargain compared to the optical-grade Wratten filters.

3. Set a custom white balance. This is not too difficult, and it will definitely provide the best approximation to your desired white balance that you will obtain in the field. Advantages: this will allow you to reproduce white accurately even with mixed lighting sources. Combine with gel over flash of (2) for the very best approach to balanced flash/incandescent lighting situations. Disadvantages: requires a "white" target (can be a neutral gray photo card, for example) and some additional time before a photo session.

You can obtain some striking effects by purposely mixing color temperature light sources. But day in and day out, getting a balanced shot is a skill that it pays to cultivate.

Feb 03, 2009 | Fuji FinePix S2 Pro Digital Camera

9 Answers

The pictures are too blue.


It sounds like a White Balancing problem. I'd guess if it's set on Auto WB, then you'll need to do it manually. Some digital cameras tend to produce that blue tint when left to white balance themselves.

If you don't understand completely let us know the exact model of the camera and I'm sure somebody can talk you through it!

Oct 01, 2008 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Problems taking photos at night.


Did you use flash? Did you use tripod? Generally speaking night photos with non-DSLR digital camera, W55 is non-DSLR, will be blurry unless either flash is used or a tripod is used. The issue is the camera shutter is set for a long exposure in order to get enough light that it is impossible to hold the camera steady. The color problem you mentioned is most likely your white balance. Normal white balance is sunlight at night you white balance should be Auto, Incandescent or Neon

Jul 23, 2008 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-W55 Digital Camera

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Green pictures panasonic fz7


Check the WHITE BALANCE settings and the COLOR EFFECTS settings (marked as W. BALANCE and COL. EFFECTS when MENU is pressed).

When you got to the MENU setting, press up or down arrow until you reached either selection, press the left arrow, and you'll see several options under the selected function. In WHITE BALANCE, there's an option whether you'll be shooting under sunny or cloudy skies, tungsten or flourescent lighting, and an option to select Auto or Manually set White Balance. This affects the over all color tone as it compensates the color correction depending on your shooting conditions. Fluorescent lighting for example exhibits blue spectrum, thus setting White Balance to FLUORESCENT will add warm or yellow tones to the photo. Tungsten lighting and sunny conditions exhibits yellow lighting, and setting to the White Balance on this mode will add cool or bluish tone to the picture.

Same with COLOR EFFECTS: settings include WARM, COOL, SEPIA or BLACK AND WHITE (gray scale).

Chances are, you have accidentally set the WHITE BALANCE or COLOR EFFECTS to any of these. To see if this is the problem, try shooting under SIMPLE MODE (Marked with a HEART icon at the rotary dial on top right of the DMC-FZ7). If the problem goes away, then it is with the WHITE BALANCE and the COLOR EFFECTS settings. Try setting the COLOR EFFECTS to "OFF", and the WHITE BALANCE to "AUTO".

If all else fails, then you got a problem with the image sensor of your Panasonic DMC-FZ7 Digicam


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Sep 27, 2007 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ7 Digital Camera

1 Answer

What is the function of the custom white balance setting?


Custom setting mode allows a user to calibrate the camera to a specific light condition. Color reproduction may be inadequate with preset white balance settings in mixed lighting condition or when critical control is needed. You can calibrate the camera's white balance to the specific light condition (color temperature) so that the lighting of the selected area is neutral.

Sep 13, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z3 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Limited setting for White Balance.


Hi: So you bought the camera but didn't make a good choise :) Yeap, the "four only options" in the Sony F55 in the White Balance Function are what you said. You have to have that in attention when buying a Digital Camera. About the White Balance > Hold, the intention is to adjust the white balance acording to an object. After you select the option, to use it you just have to point the camera to the object, press half off the shutter button to focus, then you chose the angle and press the rest of the shutter button. On the other cameras those options improve the quality of the skin tones and colors of your subjects reduzing color temperature. Regards

Sep 11, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-F55 Digital Camera

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