Question about Sony Mavica MVC-CD400 Digital Camera

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CD400 Buffer Capacity.

Using the CD400 & full 4 megapixel resolution, how many shots can be fired, (stored in the buffer) before the camera won't let you fire anymore? Thanks Jim Fels

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Well the camera has a 3 burst shot mode so I would have to say 3.

Posted on Sep 13, 2005


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Continuous mode not working

It sounds as if your buffer is filling up. The buffer is where the camera temporarily stores images before writing them to the memory card.
If you're shooting RAW, try shooting JPEG and see whether you can shoot longer bursts. If so, it's definitely a buffer problem.
Another thing that will help with the buffer is to use a faster memory card. Use a SDHC card that's rated at least Class 6 (there will be a circle with a number inside marked on the front of the card).

Feb 05, 2012 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera with 18-55mm +...

2 Answers

Hi K akima...have followed your advice, but no luck. When I go to continuous mode, it only lets me shoot a single shot, the display briefly reads r 08 then returns to r 09 again. I`ve tried my other lenses...

nikon r09,r11, etc . it mean memory buffer of your camera. memory buffer is a temporary memory for your captured images before it store to memory card.
if r00 it mean, you can't take a picture, even 1 picture... that because the camera buffer memory is full.
the number of memory buffer will also drop if noise reduction on

Feb 14, 2010 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

Once a picture has been taken you can't take another immediately - camera says busy and the shutter fires as much as five or ten seconds later!

I suspect that you're using a file format that takes longer to write, such as a TIFF or other format that's adding compression to the image. ENsure that the file format is RAW or standard JPEG, which write fairly quickly. The other issue could be the buffer size on the camera. The buffer is built-in memory that allows the camera to store images while still shooting. The images are then taken from the buffer and writes them to the card. SLR cameras, for example, tend to have large buffers and can shoot more images without writing to the card. Shooting ONE image and having to wait for the "busy" indicator to turn off seems a bit extreme, so it this isn't an old camera or a very "cheap" camera (sub $100), than you may have an issue with the buffer memory and will want to go to a camera repair shot and have them test. Check the file format first though- I suspect that you are using a format that's more write-heavy in comparison to standard RAW and JPEG files.

Another thing that you also need to consider when using Point and Shoot cameras is that they tend to be "one chip wonders". This means that instead of having multi-chip cameras (Such as digital SLR's) that can do multiple tasks at one time (shoot, write, flash, focus, exposure...) there's only ONE chip that does all of this. If you depress the shutter release half way, it keeps the chip "hot" for shooting a photo and your performance will improve slightly.

Jul 10, 2009 | Casio Exilim EX-Z750 Digital Camera

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HP6110 All in one

When the HP Office jet series all-in-one front panel screen displays Memory Full, the HP Office jet all-in-one is not able to send, receive or forward faxes. Copying will also not work. WORKAROUND: Though the memory buffer should clear itself automatically after proceeding with the next task, like receiving a fax or starting a copy job, these suggestions below may help you clearing the memory buffer by:
  • Add paper to the HP Officejet series paper tray
  • Clear a possible print jam and proceed printing the fax.
  • Reduce the copying or faxing resolution via the front panel's menu.
  • Use the HP Manager to send a (group) fax or making a copy. More memory is available this way, as the HP Manager utilizes the PC memory. When sending a group fax, the HP Officejet all-in-one's memory is filled to capacity. To copy in color is only possible from the HP Officejet Manager.
  • Press START to clear the message. If this message persists, unplug the power cord, and after at least 15 seconds plug the power cord in.
CAUSE: The HP Officejet series memory may be full due to: Copying on Photo quality or sending a group dial, which will use an extensive part of the internal memory's capacity. No paper in the paper supply tray, while receiving a fax. This may result that the data remains in the buffer. Print jam while receiving a fax or copying. The data is still stored in the buffer. System error displayed on the HP Officejet display window. SUMMARY: The HP Officejet series will not fax or copy without sufficient memory to store the data of the page in the buffer before printing the receiving fax or the copy.

May 22, 2009 | HP OfficeJet 6110 All-In-One InkJet...

1 Answer

Shutter speed won't go over 5 frames a sec. on d300

Even if your camera is rated at shooting more than five continuous frames at a time, those are stored in a memory buffer in the camera, when the buffer is full the camera writes the images to your flash memory card. How fast the memory card can accept the data will determine who fast space is made available in the buffer for a sixth or seventh shot.

The main limitation on how many images can be shot in continuous mode is based on the storage capacity of the memory buffer and also how fast images can be written to your inserted memory card.

So, the higher the resolution the image the more space it takes in the memory buffer. Should you shoot in a smaller resolution you should be able to shoot more frames continuously. However, there are a few variables involved. If the Camera is preset at the factory to not store any more than five images no matter what the resolution than there is no way around this encumbered feature. And, or the speed at which the memory card you use can accept written data will also decide how fast the buffer is cleared for new data.

The highest speed flash memory conforms with Version 6 and has a write speed of 188x.

So, the things to double check is if a limitation is built into your camera of five images and no more than five no matter what the resolution. This is not uncommon. The second is the speed at which data can be cleared from the buffer and written to the memory card, less common but a newer standard now that faster flash memory cards are becoming available.

Now, all that being said, There are 'firmware' updates released from time to time that make adjustments to camera features than can change these variables

Most Nikons use Compact Flash so see if you can get a high speed card that is version 6 compliant. But, first, check the sony support site for your camera and see if 5 is the limit no matter what. And if so, see if there is a firmware update under downloads at the support site that increases the number of shots that can be stored in buffer while being written to the flash memory card.

I have a client wtih a D60 who when she switched over to 133x Compact Flash was able to shoot more frames faster in continuous mode.

Please don't hesitate to use the comment text box below for any further assistance, such as the support page at Sony for your camera if you don't have in in yoru manual. Or any information you may need regarding shooting in high speed mode and what format to use. Most Pros that consult with me are using JPEG uncompressed. If you have questions please provide more detail on how you have your camera setup and under what conditions you are shooting in when attempting to capture more frames per continuous mode shotting.


Jan 14, 2009 | Nikon D300 Body Only Digital Camera

1 Answer

Busy signal while taking a picture

Have you been taking shots in continuous mode (burst)?  The camera has a built in buffer of fast memory where photos are stored before being written to the slower CF card.  Once the memory gets full the camera will not take another picture unless some of the images complete transfer to the CF card. You will notice a number inside your viewfinder (bottom left) the number goes down when you take a picture that is how much space is left in the buffer when it hits 0 the buffer is full it will go up as the buffer clears.  Note that RAW takes up more space and fills the buffer quickly.
If you get the "Busy" message even after just 1 shot then there is something wrong with either your CF card or your camera and you should take try another card or it to canon for service.

Nov 26, 2008 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nikon D80 Camera

During shooting, or when the shutter-release button is pressed halfway, the number of images that can be stored in the memory buffer at current settings is shown on the exposure-count displays in the control panel and viewfinder. "r06" indicates that six images can fit in the camera's buffer, "r08" would indicate eight frames. Any other number could be displayed as well. Burst mode is used when you want to hold down the shutter button and continuously shoot. You are probably shooting in burst mode and your buffer is full, set the camera to single shot and see if that helps.

Jul 02, 2008 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

How do I figure out actuations on my camera?

Pre-PMA 2004: Canon today announced the impressively specified EOS-1D Mark II which features a new 8.2 megapixel CMOS sensor, it can shoot at just over eight frames per second and has a 40 frame JPEG image buffer (20 frames in RAW mode). This means that shooting at full resolution at full speed the camera is buffering 69 megapixels per second (or 100 MB/sec). Other changes include the addition of a USB port, an SD slot, the removal of the external white balance sensor as well as some subtle body styling changes.

Feb 25, 2008 | Canon EOS-1D Mark II Digital Camera

3 Answers

Not functioning d200


Nikon D200 High Speed Performance
© 2006 Film vs. Digital About these reviews
I bought mine from Ritz here. I bought another D200 from Adorama here. Also try Amazon here. Adorama usually has D200/18-70 kits in stock here. It helps me keep adding to this site when you click these links to get yours.
My D200 is fast, smooth and quiet. Unlike my D1H, my D200 makes less noise and vibration. It doesn't feel as macho, and allows me to shoot in more places more discreetly. At five frames per second it just hums along sweetly, compared to my bigger cameras which always felt like something was going to come flying off of them from all the clattering.
Buffers versus Memory Card Memory
The D200 uses two very different kinds of memory for storing images.
We're all familiar with the CF cards used to store hundreds of images. These aren't that fast and card makers rate them for write speed. The D200 uses these for recording your images.
The D200, like all professional digital cameras, has a second very high speed internal cache memory called a buffer. You never touch this. This buffer memory stores 25 frames of JPGs, 21 frames of raw or 19 frames of raw + JPG.
The buffer memory is fast enough to store all these frames at the full 5FPS rate, or faster.
The D200 is never slowed by memory speed card. The D200, like other professional cameras, has a second independent set of processors which handle writing the contents of the fast buffer memory to the slower CF card. Because this writing is done with a second set of processors you never know it's working except for the green CF light on the back. The D200 can be busy for over a minute writing to the CF card and you still have the complete ability to shoot at 5 FPS and play back.
The buffer is so deep that even under the heaviest shooting it's unlikely that you'll ever fill it. Even if you fill the buffer you can still make photos and playback, just that the maximum shooting rate will lower a bit until the buffer write and frees up at least one frame.
It takes it a 100 seconds to write 400 MB of data from 19 uncompressed RAW + Large FINE JPG files to my 40x 1GB Lexar card. As a photographer you don't care how long it takes to write. So long as the buffer isn't full the camera works as fast as ever. Even if it is full you can shoot the next shot as soon as the buffer clears enough room. You don't have to wait for everything to write to make a next shot. Even with my slow 40x lexar 1GB card, a constipated buffer and huge compressed raw + JPG Large Fine files I can make a new shot every 3.2 seconds. With uncompressed raw + JPG Fine Large I can get off a new shot with a full buffer every 3.7 seconds. If you ever get to these limits you're doing something stupid. Just shoot JPG and you'll never be able to fill up the buffer faster than you can shoot. With Large FINE Optimal Quality JPGs the buffer clears at the rate of 1 FPS. With Large Basic Optimal Quality JPGs I can run at 2 FPS even with a full buffer. Use the smaller image sizes or the Size Priority JPG setting and you can shoot as fast with the buffer full as empty!
I've had to do seriously stupid tests to fill it up.
Shot Buffer Readout
A shot buffer is fast memory inside the camera which stores the shots you've just made. Your memory card is written from this buffer. Even with the slowest card on earth you can shoot as fast as you want, since it all sits in the buffer until written. Your card is recorded in the background while you shoot. The green CF light tells you this is happening.
The size of this buffer is how many shots it can hold while allowing you to shoot at 5 FPS. If it gets full the camera slows to only as fast as your card will accept data, which is about one frame per second . These buffers are why you don't need to worry about card speed.
I've never filled up more than 9 shots in a buffer. I don't shoot that fast. With a 25 frame buffer the D200 has far more than I'll ever use.
This is the number you see while the shutter button is pressed halfway. It usually looks like [r25], which means it's empty and can hold 25 more shots. Normally you'll see a big number like [527] or [ 1.3]k, which is how many shots are left on your card. As you shoot fast sequences you can see this number drop. When it drops to [r00] your buffer is full and the camera slows down its shooting until the buffer is recorded to the card. It's fun to look at when you get your camera, but since I never fill it up I don't worry about it. You'd have to be shooting many long high speed sequences continuously with a slow card ever to use much of this.

Jan 27, 2008 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera with 18-200mm...

1 Answer

Buffer size

the manual sholud tell you this - check out the PDF file on the software disk

Sep 06, 2005 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ10 Digital Camera

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