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How fast is the AF speed? - Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z5 Digital Camera

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Re: How fast is the AF speed?

Wide-angle: Approx. 0.2 sec Telephoto: Approx. 0.3 sec

Posted on Sep 13, 2005

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I get blurred indication on display and the pictures clicked are dark and not clear.


1. Your shutter speed's too slow

Take the effective focal length of your lens and divide it into 1 to get the minimum safe handheld shutter speed you should use. For example, with a 200mm equivalent lens, you shouldn't shoot any slower than 1/200sec or you risk camera shake. You might even get some shake at 1/500sec.

2. You're placing too much trust in VR

Nikon's Vibration Reduction system can let you shoot with shutter speeds four stops slower than usual - but don't count on it. This is a best-case scenario, and it's wise to assume no more than two stops. VR improves your success rate, it doesn't guarantee sharpness.

3. Your subject is moving

Moving subjects will appear blurred at slow shutter speeds, so even if you can hold your camera steady and even if the VR system does a great job, you will still need to use fast shutter speeds for moving subjects.

4. The ISO is too high

Sometimes you have to use really high ISOs just to avoid camera shake, but be aware that at the highest settings you will see a loss of detail. The camera uses noise reduction processes to reduce the appearance of noise, and these erode fine detail too.

field myths

Depth of field is the zone of near-to-far sharpness within your pictures, but it's only apparent sharpness, not real sharpness. Depth of field relies on objects looking sharp enough at normal viewing distances and magnifications even though they're ever so slightly out of focus. If you zoom in far enough, you will see that some objects aren't completely sharp even when they're technically within the depth of field limits.

6. Your lens aperture is too small

Small apertures used to be associated with better image quality. That was when lenses were comparatively unsophisticated and cameras used larger formats, such as 35mm and 120 roll film. But at small apertures an unavoidable optical effect called 'diffraction' sets in, where fine detail starts to blur. With today's smaller sensors and sophisticated zoom lens designs, you can see this as early as f/11. If you shoot at f/16 or f/22, your shots will be visibly softer than those shot at wider apertures.

7. You're focused on the wrong thing

Watch the AF points in the camera's viewfinder. If you're using auto-area AF, the camera will pick the nearest subject, which may not be what you intended. If you're using single-point AF, make sure the AF point's over the correct part of the scene. Tip: on some cameras, including the D3100, it's very easy to accidentally push the AF point to the right with the base of your thumb as you hold the camera and not notice.

8. Handheld close-ups shots are risky!

When you're really close to your subject, the depth of field is so small that the slightest movement on your part will throw your subject out of focus. The more you concentrate on staying still, the more you sway! Higher shutter speeds won't make the slightest difference - you need a tripod.

9. Focus/recompose errors

It's often useful to focus on one thing then keep the shutter button half-pressed so that you can recompose the picture and shoot. But in that time, you may have moved, the subject may have moved or, if the camera's in its default AF-A mode, it make think the subject is moving, switch to AF-C (continuous) operation and attempt to re-focus.

10. Is your lens clean?

If you walk into a humid indoor environment, your lens may mist up, producing a blurry, soft-focus effect. Other causes of blur are greasy smears and fingermarks - so check the front of your lens before blaming the camera.

Aug 02, 2015 | Digital Cameras

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Every time i take a picture with my nikon d-40 the pictures are blurry. the camera is on auto focus but i can't seem to get the picture to come out clear. any suggestions?


Is your shutter speed fast enough? If not, you'll need a faster shutter speed or a tripod.

Are you using the proper focus sensor? Is the entire image blurry or just portions of it?

What happens if you focus manually? If it comes out sharp, then there's a problem either with the lens or the autofocus system on the camera. Have you tried it with a different lens?

Is the AF switch on the lens set to A?

Jun 04, 2009 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

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Nikon D90 Self-Timer does not work when flash is engaged.


The answer to your question can be found at...

This website

All but the very best flashes can not recycle atthat flash rate. For burst mode, you probably want to use focus modeAF-C or AF-A.
Morris

Page 73 in the manual; If the flash fires in L or H mode (pg. 65), only one picture will be taken each time the
shutter-release button is pressed. The shutterrelease may be briefly disabled to protect the flash after it has beenused for several consecutive shots. The flash can be used again after ashort pause.
The flash can take several seconds to recharge andduring that time the shutter is disabled. NR will also reduce thenumber of frames per second that you can take, and of course yourshutter speed has to be fast enough to allow for 4.5 fps.
In AF-S the shutter won’t fire unless the camera has achieved an in-focus state and the focus is locked.
In AF-C the camera continually focuses, but that isnot the same thing as being in focus. As you move the camera or yoursubject moves, the in focus state will come and go, but the camera willattempt to continuously re-focus. BUT, the shutter will fire even ifwhen the AF system has lost the in-focus state and the picture is outof focus.
In the D90 manual it indicates that the AF-A modewill only fire when the green in-focus light is on, just like in AF-S.The problem is that you probably won’t get 4.5 fps unless both thecamera and the subject are stationary and no time is lost between shotswhile the camera re-focuses.
--
Brooks
http://bmiddleton.smugmug.com/

Mar 06, 2009 | Nikon D90 Digital Camera with 18-105mm...

1 Answer

Sony W1 Questions


It has Multi AF, Center AF or fixed focus. The V1 i had went to 800ISO, if you turn the ISO up a little more may you can set a faster shutter speed. I think the only priority settings are the "scene modes" there may be an action ssetting in the scene modes.

Sep 15, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-W1 Digital Camera

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What is the rate of continuous advance?


The speed is selectable from 3 types at the continuous advance. Continuous advance: Single shot AF: max. 1.8 fps (live view and anti-shake are activated for each frame. TIFF image cannot be taken), continuous AF: max. 1.9 fps (live view, AF, AE, anti-shake are activated for each frame. TIFF image cannot be taken.) Hi-Speed continuous advance: max. 2.7 fps (Anti-shake is activated for each frame. AF, AE, WB, and live view are fixed at the first frame. TIFF image cannot be taken.) UHS continuous advance: 7 fps. (Image size is fixed at 640x480. AF, AE, and WB are fixed at the first frame. TIFF and RAW image cannot be taken. Digital zoom disabled.) Actual speed may vary depending on the subjects and shooting conditions. * Three frames can be taken continuously in normal and Hi continuous mode. *In UHS mode, the images can be taken as much as possible to the limitation of the storage capacity. For reference, STD: 180 frames, FINE: 160 frames, X. FINE: 100 frames (approx.).

Sep 15, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE A2 Digital Camera

2 Answers

What is the available shutter speed range?


The DiMAGE A1 controls shutter speed in the range of 30 sec. to 1/16000 sec. in 1/3 increments. (at bulb maximum 30 sec.).

Sep 15, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE A1 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Shutter lag


we're talking milliseconds... my camera takes the picture when i press the trigger and sometimes its so fast that accidentally take the picture before i have focus lock (that my error not the cameras, i just get trigger happy sometimes)

Sep 07, 2005 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ5 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Sequential shooting modes


There are four sequential modes: Sequential shooting, High-speed Sequential shooting, AF Sequential shooting and Auto Bracketing. Sequential shooting modes can be selected from the CAMERA menu: Sequential shooting: A maximum of 11 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 1.7 fps in HQ mode. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. High-speed Sequential shooting: A maximum of 4 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 3.3 fps. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. AF Sequential shooting: Focus is individually locked for each frame. The AF Sequential shooting speed is slower than for normal sequential shooting. Auto Bracketing: When Auto bracketing is set, exposure is changed automatically for each frame when you start shooting. The exposure differential can be selected in the menus. Focus and white balance are locked at the first frame.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-8080 Wide Zoom Digital...

1 Answer

Sequential shooting modes


There are four modes: Sequential shooting, High-speed Sequential shooting, AF Sequential shooting and Auto Bracketing. Sequential shooting modes can be selected from the DRIVE mode menu: Sequential shooting: A maximum of 11 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 1.7 fps in HQ mode. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. High-speed Sequential shooting: A maximum of 4 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 3.3 fps. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. AF Sequential shooting: Focus is individually locked for each frame. The AF Sequential shooting speed is slower than for normal sequential shooting. Auto Bracketing: When Auto bracketing is set, exposure is changed automatically for each frame when you start shooting. The exposure differential can be selected in the menus. Focus and white balance are locked at the first frame.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-60 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

Sequential shooting modes


There are four modes: Sequential shooting, High-speed Sequential shooting, AF Sequential shooting and Auto Bracketing. Sequential shooting modes can be selected from the DRIVE mode menu: - Sequential shooting: A maximum of 11 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 1.7 fps in HQ mode. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. - High-speed Sequential shooting: A maximum of 4 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 3.3 fps. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. - AF Sequential shooting: Focus is individually locked for each frame. The AF Sequential shooting speed is slower than for normal sequential shooting. - Auto Bracketing: When Auto bracketing is set, exposure is changed automatically for each frame when you start shooting. The exposure differential can be selected in the menus. Focus and white balance are locked at the first frame.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-5060 Wide Zoom Digital...

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