Question about Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

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Metering in manual or Aperture Priority

I have the Epson 3000z, I always use it in manual or Aperture priority. When I am metering the subject (pressing shutter button halfway) It will not display(for recommended exposure) a shutter speed less then 1/2 second, no matter what f-stop I use. This would be for low light long exposures, 1- 8 seconds. Is this what others have found or is it a defect?

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I have found with this camera that when you set the aperture and shutter speed in manual it will display recommended settings and not the settings you had just set. But when the picture is taken and you display the settings in software that the camera used, it actually uses the settings you set and not the ones displayed on the camera. I think the settings displayed are recommended settings. Very strange! Also the camera changes settings on zooming.

Posted on Sep 13, 2005

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85mm 1.4 is not metering exposure on my nikon d7000


It is a manual focus lens. That is for sure. The D7000 only can meter, when a lens is fitted with a chip. Usually the Nikon AF lenses. (other brands like Sigma that are compatible) To my knowledge the Vivitar is not. You only can use this lens in Aperture-priority and manual exposure. See a discussion on Nikon forum about this lens, that is capable of shooting brilliant pictures.
Link to Nikon cafe forum about Vivitar 85 mm

Aug 29, 2013 | Vivitar Cameras

1 Answer

I'm doing a project for school and i need to change the aperture for different photos. But my camera refuses to take the photo on any other aperture. Why is there an aperture adjuster if you can't use it....


It depends on the lens.

If you're using a lens with an aperture ring, simply set the exposure mode to Manual or Aperture priority and change the aperture by turning the aperture ring on the lens. In Aperture priority the camera will set the shutter speed appropriately, in Manual you have to determine the appropriate shutter speed. If you want to use such a lens in Shutter priority or one of the Program modes, you must set the aperture to its smallest setting (largest f/number) and lock it.

If you're using a lens without an aperture ring then it's a bit harder. You can only use the camera in Shutter priority or one of the Program modes. You turn the command dial on the camera to change the exposure, and the aperture will change. If you want to use an exposure different than what the meter suggests, you can adjust it by using either exposure compensation or changing the ISO setting (or both).

If you need a manual, you can download one from
http://butkus.org/chinon/nikon/nikon_n6006af/nikon_n6006af.htm

Mar 08, 2011 | Nikon N6006 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

I am new so do I keep the f22 lock on when auto focusing?


No. You only need to do that when using any exposure modes where the camera needs to take full control of the aperture setting for you (basically everything except full manual metering and aperture priority metering). The idea is that by setting the lens to the minimum f-number (aperture) the camera can then automatically set the actual aperture required by the exposure meter and exposure program to anything between maximum aperture (lowest f-number) and the f22 set on the lens.

Aperture settings are independent of autofocus on all SLR cameras. If you're new to SLR photography then I highly recommend the latest (2009) edition of John Hedgecoe's New Manual of Photography. The link is just to show you the book and not an endorsement of the featured supplier; I'm sure that you'll want to make your own buying choices.

I hope this has helped, if so please return the favour by taking a moment to rate my answer. If not then please explain your problem in more detail and I'll be happy to offer further assistance.

Oct 30, 2009 | Nikon Normal AF Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D...

1 Answer

How do i read a light meter on a Nikon N55? i see the f stop but i dont see the shuter speed, how do i adjust and how do i know its right?


Your camera is either fully automatic or fully manual. In addition it has shutter priority and aperture priority semi-automatic functions. With shutter prior. you pick the shutter speed you prefer and the camera will adjust the aperture. With Aperture prior it works the other way around. The exposure will be always the optimum (decided by the camera program).
You can adjust these automatics with the program dial.

Oct 28, 2009 | Nikon N55 35mm Film Camera

1 Answer

How to KNOW the light is right 4 an Olympus OM20 Manual camera?


OM-20 was basically a upgraded OM-10 with the manual adapter built in and a number of other refinements.

The viewfinder has LED's to show the shutter speed recommended by the camera's lightmeter for the ISO and aperture selected. It also has an exposure compensation indicator (the +/- symbol) and an indicator for flash ready which doubles up as a post-exposure flash confirmation. There is also the indicator lamp to show manual mode has been selected. OM-10 lacks the manual mode lamp and the +/- indicator.

Like the OM-10, the OM-20 is primarily an aperture priority automatic camera. In this mode you set the ISO film speed, choose which aperture you wish to use (with the ability to use the lens depth of field preview button) and then the camera selects the correct shutter speed. The +/- exposure compensation control allows the user to tell the camera to modify the recommended shutter speed by up to two stops either way.

In manual mode, there is no manual metering. The light meter behaves exactly as it does in aperture priority mode and the viewfinder shows the recommended shutter speed and not the manually selected one. Correct metering is therefore a case of adjusting the aperture first, and then choosing the correct shutter speed indicated in the viewfinder. If the user then decides to select a different shutter speed, then the aperture ring must be adjusted to maintain the correct exposure. For example the aperture is set to f8 and the camera recommends 1/60th of a second. The user decides that a faster shutter speed is required and chooses 1/250th, but the viewfinder remains showing 1/60th. In order to keep the same exposure value the user must open the aperture by two full stops to f4. The camera's light meter will detect the new aperture setting and providing the light on the object is unchanged the viewfinder shutter speed display should now show 1/250th as well to confirm the correct adjustment. Alternatively, the user can choose the shutter speed first by looking at what has been set on the control ring (or by turning the ring to the end of its travel and then counting the clicks from there as all experienced OM users do) and then turning the aperture ring until the shutter speed shown in the viewfinder matches what's been manually set.

It all sounds clumsy and complex but is done far more quickly than I've taken to type this and becomes second nature.

Aperture priority metering is selected on the camera by choosing AUTO on the mode selecter. In this mode the shutter speed ring has no effect and the viewfinder always displays the automatically selected shutter speed.

May 09, 2009 | Olympus OM-2000 35mm SLR Camera

1 Answer

Aperture priority not working...HELP!!


Hey Mike, This is an easy one. With the battery grip attached, you can only have either Shutter Priority or Aperture Priority work properly. You can change it with the custom function settings of the camera. So you can change it to work with Aperture Priority if you use that more so then shutter priority won't work. Brandon

Oct 21, 2006 | Nikon F100 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Aperture priority only in manual mode?


Yes. You pick the apature (the 3000 keeps it aorund the setting you pick) and then it automaticly adjusts the speed for you.

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

1 Answer

Aperture Priority Mode - an undocumented feature


In addition to the "quirks" of the Landscape and Aperture Priority Modes (neither mode works as documented!)..... The camera also behaves differently in full Manual Mode (it changes the settings, whether you want it to or not to compensate for available light)... At lower Zoom Levels, the camera will adjust the Shutter Speed Only, to try and compensate for available light... For example: with the Camera preset to F5.6 Aperture, and 1/48 sec. shutter speed, the camera will adjust the shutter speed between a range of 1/30 to 1/291 sec, to try and "auto expose" the shot for lower or higher light levels, even though you're in manual mode. At an Aperture Setting of 2.8 and 1/48 of a second, the number of internal steps in shutter speed the camera is willing to take, increases dramatially - for example: shutter speeds up to 1/600 of a second, even though you have the shutter set to 1/48 in manual mode. The camera WILL NOT attempt to adjust the Aperture to compensate for proper exposure in available light (OR WILL IT??).... It depends on your Zoom settings! It won't if your're near to full wide angle, but IT WILL if you are using the Zoom. Once you cross some unknown zoom threshold (it doesn't have to be at full zoom), then the camera begins to change both the Aperture and Shutter speed to compensate for available light, even though you are in "Full Manual", versus Auto Exposure Mode. In Manual Mode, (as in Aperture Priority Mode), the amount of change the camera is willing to make to your settings, appears to be related to a preset number of internal steps, with the number of steps dependent on both Aperture and Zoom Settings, before it gives an EV Warning for Over or Under Exposure conditions.... The type (shutter speed only for wide angle, shutter and aperture for zoom) and amount (number of internal "steps" it takes to increase/decrease shutter speed and increase or decrease aperture), is dependent on the amount of zoom you are using for the current shot.

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

2 Answers

Shutter priority mode?


s I understand it from what I have seen on the Web, the 3000Z can operate in several modes: 1. Fully automatic (camera select both 2. Manual (user sets both aperture and shutter speed). 3. Aperture Priority mode - user sets aperture and camera chooses correct shutter speed to get a good exposure Apparently there is no Shutter Priority mode (user cannot set only the shutter er speed and allow the camera to set the aperature to get a good exposure). This option is available on the Epson 850Z camera and this seems like a silly ommision to make on a "high-end" camera like the 3000Z.

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

1 Answer

Why do my pictures look too dark?


You may need to use the flash. Make sure the setting is not flash off. If you're using the flash, make sure your subject is within the range of 14 feet for wide angle shots or 11 feet for telephoto shots. Use Image Expert to adjust the picture's brightness and contrast. Try adjusting the camera's exposure or sensitivity settings (use the Manual user mode). If you're taking pictures in the Manual user mode, look for the EV! warning that appears on your LCD screen when you are taking pictures out of the ideal exposure range. If you have trouble setting both the aperture and shutter speed manually, try adjusting the aperture and letting the camera choose the shutter speed with Aperture Priority mode. If you're using the macro mode to take a close-up photo, be sure to provide adequate lighting for your subject. If you're taking a picture at night and you want to light up the background as well as your subject, use the camera's slow synchronized flash mode. If you need more light, attach an optional external flash to the camera's hot shoe.

Sep 12, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

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