Question about Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

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3000z Landscape Mode Broken!

The Landscape mode appears to have a firmware bug.... Even though there is enough light to set the aperture at F8, the camera is setting it at everything EXCEPT F8 -- as though it's in full auto mode: Examples of shots I just took, AND YES, I'M SURE IT'S IN LANDSCAPE MODE -- SAYS SO RIGHT ON THE BACK WHILE TAKING SHOTS: Program Landscape, ISO >, W/B AUTO, Normal FRame, x1, ***, etc. F6.3 1/190 F4.6 1/153 F6.3 1/150 F6.3 1/163 F4.6 1/186 F6.3 1/126 I reformatted the card, and repeated the experiment with similiar results, just to make sure I was in Landscape mode... Had anybody else try Landscape with their 3000z yet?

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Re: 3000z Landscape Mode Broken!

With the camera in Landscape mode, if I point and shoot a landscape picture that is well lit, I have no problems achieving a f8 reading as described in the user's manual downloaded from http://www.epson.com (US). Since I'm standing from my apartment's balcony, I now recompose my shot's view so that it is partially in the shade. The my aperture reading is now reduced from f8 to f5.6. I tried this many times over, and what I described above is consistent. I reckon the program mode is intelligent to realise that it doesn't have enough light to set the camera to an f8 reading, so instead it selects the next best aperture setting. As along as the camera is aperture biased for high f values, it's reasonable to assume the camera's landscape functioning correctly. Remember, in landscape mode the Epson's metering is set to matrix mode. The Japanese documentation states that matrix metering takes 256 different readings from view. This would seem to support my shade theory, where the view is partially well lit, therefore a f8 setting might not be optimal. If the Epson was forced to f8 in overcast conditions, surely taking pictures would become a nightmare. It would make more sense for each program to have an ideal setting (say f8 or f2 etc.) if conditions are met, otherwise an optimal setting is given for a particular composition. The US user's manual also states that in low light conditions the Epson will be set to an f2 value. Again I had no problems achieving this when in low light conditions (indoors, dark areas outdoors etc.) and camera set to landscape mode. I would tend to agree with Bev, in that Epson have been a little casual in their documentation, therefore leading many of us to suspect that there is a fault with the Epson. I have a Japanese version of the 3000Z (serial number - CCY0007454, firmware ver. v321-78), its documentation, which I asked my Japanese wife to translate for me, does not state specific f values for each program mode, but instead describes the nature of each program mode. For example: Sports - biased for high shutter speeds Portrait - biased for low f value to achieve a shorter DOF Landscape - biased for high f values to achieve a longer DOF Based on theses descriptions, I would say my Epson is functioning correctly.

Posted on Sep 13, 2005

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Re: 3000z Landscape Mode Broken!

I looked at the recorded details of 10 of my landscape photos (in the Image Expert 2000 software that came with the Epson). All were taken on a very bright, sunny day at my local golf course. F settings indicated on each photo in the details section of the software were as follows: 8.6, 8.2,6.9 (in some shadows),9.1,8.0,8.0,10.1,10.1,9.1, and 8.6. All photos were excellent, with no fringing, or any other abnormalities when viewed full screen on my 21" Sony monitor. I printed out an 8x 10 copy of one of the best ones on my new Epson 870 printer and the results were outstanding. Exactly the same colors as on the monitor and the print quality was the best I have seen from an ink jet printer.

Posted on Sep 13, 2005

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Re: 3000z Landscape Mode Broken!

If you are thinking you need to get to minimum aperture to maximize depth of field, keep in mind that the depth of field is determined by the PHYSICAL size of the iris, not the RELATIVE value (which is what the f-stop measures) -- for example, on a 35 mm camera, a 28 mm lens at f5.6 will have much greater dof than a 200mm lens at f5.6 - because the actual iris opening is effectively 5 mm on the wideangle, but almost 36 mm on the telephoto. The physical apertures on digital cams, with their MUCH shorter real (not 35mm equiv) focal lengths, range from effectively about 7 mm at max telephoto wide open to *less than 1mm* at wide angle stopped all the way down. The issue with digicams is not that you have too little dof, but that it is a real pain in the a$$ to try and not have too much dof for portraits and such. I'm guessing the Epson firmware deliberately tries to avoid the max aperture for two reasons - to avoid camera shake at slow shutter speeds (are you shooting at telephoto zoom lengths?) and to avoid essentially turning the camera into a pinhole Brownie, with the inherent edge distortion that will occur. You seem to have written off the epson and are looking (really hard, IMO) for reasons to make sure that you've made the right decision. If you are unhappy with it, it will be hard to swing the pendulum in the other direction (speaking from personal experience after I bought a Kodak 240 and decided I wanted something "more"). You might as well return it and move on to the next contestant.

Posted on Sep 13, 2005

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Manual that came with camera does not explain symbols for setting the mode. Amazing! What do M, A,S,P, N and SP 1 and SP2 stand for? the only things I understand are Auto and Panorama.


M stands for 'Manual mode'. This is the mode wherein you set your shutter speed and aperture setting. A stands for 'Aperture Priority'. This is the mode where you set the aperture or opening of the lens and the camera sets the shutter speed. The lower the aperture number setting, the more light penetrates the lens, a faster shutter speed is needed. This setting is usually used for portrait scenarios. S stands for 'Shutter priority'. This is the mode where you set the shutter speed and the camera sets the aperture. The higher shutter speed number, the lower aperture number is set by the camera to accommodate more light into the lens. This setting is usually used for capturing moving objects like cars. P stands for 'Program Mode'. The camera takes care of different settings except for the aperture and the shutter speed. You get to choose combinations of aperture and shutter speed settings that will not change the exposure of your scene. This is like a combined 'A' and 'S' mode with different combinations. N stands for 'Natural Light'. The camera tries to make use of available light. This is ideal for indoor use when flash is prohibited or when you just want to capture the ambiance of the scene. The camera sets a high sensitivity setting to handle low light conditions. The drawback of this would be grainier pictures. SP1 and SP2 stand for Scene Position 1 and 2. This is like a memory setting for most commonly used scene settings. For example, you can assign SP1 for landscape mode scene and SP2 for night mode scene. You have 13 scenes to choose from in your camera, 2 of which you can assign in SP1 or SP2. The default setting for SP1 is Portrait mode and for SP2, it is Landscape mode.
Hope this helps.

Apr 15, 2011 | Fuji FinePix S1000FD Digital Camera

1 Answer

Just started using Canon Rebel EOS XSI that we got last year. Landscape picures are not crisp and clear even using landscape mode. What are we doing wrong?


Basically putting the camera in modes other than Manual, TV or AV means that's you've given up a lot of control, so the camera is left to its own devices to solve the scene. When shooting landscapes you need a large depth of field, which means the camera chooses a higher F-number for your photo. Higher F-numbers mean less light gets into the camera, since the shutter speed has to stay high enough for you to shoot handheld. So now you've got two things t work which reduce the amount of light hitting the sensor: small aperture (high F-number) and fast shutter speed. Since the camera meters the scene and has only one remaining factor to get "correct" exposure, all it can do is set the ISO according to the two other mandatory settings of F-number and shutter speed. If there's enough light (bright, sunny day) then it can remain at ISO 100, which is usually the best quality image. If there's insufficient light though, then it may go as high as ISO 800 or even ISO 1600 to allow the small aperture and fast shutter speed. This will make your photos look grainy.

Instead, I recommend that you set the camera to AV Mode, put your F-number to F8.0, set your ISO manually to ISO 100, and use a tripod. Additionally you can use the custom functions menu to lock up the mirror (prevents "slap" which shakes the camera and makes the image less sharp) and also use 2-sec timer (select it using the button to the left of "set" on the back of the camera).

Following those steps you should get the sharpest photos your lens and camera body will allow. Be sure to use autofocus by defeault and switch to manual if you want to fine-tune (or if AF is "hunting" and not locking on a target) and also turn Image Stabilization OFF if using a tripod. Good luck!

Jun 21, 2010 | Canon EOS Rebel XSi Digital Camera

2 Answers

Aperture priority only in manual mode?


Yes. You pick the apature (the 3000 keeps it aorund the setting you pick) and then it automaticly adjusts the speed for you.

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

2 Answers

External Flash for 3000Z


I have tried a couple of external flashes on the 3000Z. It is my understanding from reading various Internet posts (and I am sure someone will correct me if I am wrong) that, other than triggering the flash to go off, there is no communication between the external flash in the hot shoe of the 3000Z and the 3000Z itself. Settings need to be made manually in the manual mode to set the f-stop and the aperture to get good exposures. The Metz flashes are expensive. Most have opted to use less expensive flashes such as the Vivitar 283/383, or a Sunpak, or even a "Wal-mart" flash. I chose an inexpensive bounce flash with a secondary "fill-in" flash to get rid of the shadows sometimes seen with indoor bounce flash pics. I purchased the Phoenix 82ZBDA Multi-dedicated twin flash from Porter's Photo Catalogue for $37.95. This flash works fine, but is not that powerful (GN 79 ). If you need a more powerful flash, you might consider the Vivitar 383.

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

1 Answer

Aperture Priority Mode - an undocumented feature


In addition to the "quirks" of the Landscape and Aperture Priority Modes (neither mode works as documented!)..... The camera also behaves differently in full Manual Mode (it changes the settings, whether you want it to or not to compensate for available light)... At lower Zoom Levels, the camera will adjust the Shutter Speed Only, to try and compensate for available light... For example: with the Camera preset to F5.6 Aperture, and 1/48 sec. shutter speed, the camera will adjust the shutter speed between a range of 1/30 to 1/291 sec, to try and "auto expose" the shot for lower or higher light levels, even though you're in manual mode. At an Aperture Setting of 2.8 and 1/48 of a second, the number of internal steps in shutter speed the camera is willing to take, increases dramatially - for example: shutter speeds up to 1/600 of a second, even though you have the shutter set to 1/48 in manual mode. The camera WILL NOT attempt to adjust the Aperture to compensate for proper exposure in available light (OR WILL IT??).... It depends on your Zoom settings! It won't if your're near to full wide angle, but IT WILL if you are using the Zoom. Once you cross some unknown zoom threshold (it doesn't have to be at full zoom), then the camera begins to change both the Aperture and Shutter speed to compensate for available light, even though you are in "Full Manual", versus Auto Exposure Mode. In Manual Mode, (as in Aperture Priority Mode), the amount of change the camera is willing to make to your settings, appears to be related to a preset number of internal steps, with the number of steps dependent on both Aperture and Zoom Settings, before it gives an EV Warning for Over or Under Exposure conditions.... The type (shutter speed only for wide angle, shutter and aperture for zoom) and amount (number of internal "steps" it takes to increase/decrease shutter speed and increase or decrease aperture), is dependent on the amount of zoom you are using for the current shot.

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

1 Answer

Purple Tint Sky


auto white balance should work OK. I was thinking maybe you had accidentally switched it to the Fixed setting. Hmm. You said you were using Normal and Landscape modes. Just to see how it works, I would suggest switching from Program mode to Full Auto. See if that fixes your purple skies. I don't know why it would, but it is something to try

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

2 Answers

Shutter priority mode?


s I understand it from what I have seen on the Web, the 3000Z can operate in several modes: 1. Fully automatic (camera select both 2. Manual (user sets both aperture and shutter speed). 3. Aperture Priority mode - user sets aperture and camera chooses correct shutter speed to get a good exposure Apparently there is no Shutter Priority mode (user cannot set only the shutter er speed and allow the camera to set the aperature to get a good exposure). This option is available on the Epson 850Z camera and this seems like a silly ommision to make on a "high-end" camera like the 3000Z.

Sep 13, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

1 Answer

Why do my pictures look too dark?


You may need to use the flash. Make sure the setting is not flash off. If you're using the flash, make sure your subject is within the range of 14 feet for wide angle shots or 11 feet for telephoto shots. Use Image Expert to adjust the picture's brightness and contrast. Try adjusting the camera's exposure or sensitivity settings (use the Manual user mode). If you're taking pictures in the Manual user mode, look for the EV! warning that appears on your LCD screen when you are taking pictures out of the ideal exposure range. If you have trouble setting both the aperture and shutter speed manually, try adjusting the aperture and letting the camera choose the shutter speed with Aperture Priority mode. If you're using the macro mode to take a close-up photo, be sure to provide adequate lighting for your subject. If you're taking a picture at night and you want to light up the background as well as your subject, use the camera's slow synchronized flash mode. If you need more light, attach an optional external flash to the camera's hot shoe.

Sep 12, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

3 Answers

Difference between Auto Picture/Program Mode


Auto Picture-selects on of the picture mode such as landscape(mountain), macro(flower), sport/action(running man) mode, etc. P-sets shutter and aperture. You set everything else. happy face- sets shutter, aperture and everything else.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

1 Answer

The best situation to use each of the shooting modes


The shooting modes are described as follows: AUTO (Factory default setting) Auto mode is used for regular photography. The camera automatically makes the settings for natural color balance. Other functions, such as the flash mode and metering, can be adjusted manually. Portrait Portrait mode is suitable for taking a portrait-style picture of a person. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Night scene Night scene mode is suitable for shooting pictures in the evening or at night. The camera sets a slower shutter speed than is used in normal shooting. If you take a picture of a street at night in any other mode, the lack of brightness will result in a dark picture with only dots of light showing. In this mode, the true appearance of the street is captured. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. If you use the flash, you can take pictures of both your subject and the night background. SCENE Scene mode enables you to select one of the following scene shooting modes available in the menu. Landscape + Scene shooting Landscape + Scene shooting is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. This mode produces clear, sharp pictures with excellent detail, making it ideal for shooting natural scenery. Landscape + Portrait shooting Landscape + Portrait shooting is suitable for taking photos of both your subject and the background. The picture is taken with the background as well as the subject in the foreground in focus. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting settings QuickTime Movie Quicktime Movie mode lets you record movies. The focus and zoom are locked. If the distance to the subject changes, the focus may be compromised. Landscape Landscape mode is suitable for taking pictures of landscapes and other outdoor scenes. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. Self-portrait Self-portrait mode enables you to take a picture of yourself while holding the camera. Point the lens towards yourself, and the focus will be locked on you. The camera automatically sets the optimal shooting conditions. The zoom is fixed in the wide position and cannot be changed. My Mode Enables you to make settings manually and register them in the mode dial's mode so you can call up your own shooting mode whenever you want. Program shooting (P) Program shooting allows you to shoot using an aperture and shutter speed that the camera sets. You can set the flash, white balance, or other functions manually. Aperture priority shooting (A) Aperture priority shooting allows you to set the aperture manually. The camera sets the shutter speed automatically. By decreasing the aperture value (F-number), the camera will focus within a smaller range, producing a picture with a blurred background. Increasing the value will let the camera focus over a wider range in the forward and backward directions, resulting in a picture in which

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-60 Zoom Digital Camera

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