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Does Hypict really help the resolution?

I've checked the pictures at Steve's site. The Hypict seems less clear, i.e., less resolution, than the pictures taken without Hypict. Any explanation, or those with the camera, does Hypict really help the resolution?

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Re: Does Hypict really help the resolution?

Hypict degrades image qulity a bit because it is interpolation. You can basically do the same thing in photoshop with similar results, I haven't tested this yet. What it does do is make a beter looking 11x14 print than using the 1200x1600 setting, with no after shot manipulation by the user, so if you knew you wanted the image bigger for some reason, and didn't want to manipulate it later you would do this.

Posted on Sep 13, 2005

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How do i know if my bushnell 119438 Nature View Hybrid Trail Camera is faulty?


Why do you think it has a problem? Your video appears to be working. It is bright, due to IR reflection, but the animals can be seen and the picture seems to be in focus.

Have you checked the user manual instructions for setting it up correctly? From the manual recommendations, the camera in this instance may be set too close (page 27). If you need a copy of the manual, you can download it from here: http://www.manualslib.com/download/717012/Bushnell-119438.html

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My Fujifilm FinePix F20 camera keeps giving the Memory Full warning with less than 50 pictures on it. This is with the XD card. It used to hold nearly 300 pictures. The card and camera memory have been...


My guess is that you used to take pictures at a lower resolution than you are now doing. High resolution pictures take more storage space than lower resolution ones.

Nov 16, 2010 | Fuji FinePix F20 Digital Camera

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Blurry indoor photos


blurry pictures often comes from the slightest movement when the pictures is snapped.
Don;t know if that is your problem or not try a photo tripod and see if that helps or check your trouble shooting area of your amnual. if you don't have the manual go to this site for any type of manual::::
http://tv.manualsonline.com/search.html?q=vr+5940&submit.x=35&submit.y=14

Aug 28, 2009 | Digital Cameras

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Picture Resolution?


Picture resolution is the total number of pixels in your picture (those little colored dots when you look really really close). It's expressed in megapixels and is simply the product of the number of pixels in the width of the picture times the number of pixels in the length. For example, a 7.1 MP camera takes images with a resolution of 3072 pixels width by 2304 pixels height ( 7.1MP = 3072 x 2304).

Pixels/inch refers to the resolution of your picture on some external viewing device (printer, computer monitor, etc...). It has nothing to do with the settings on your camera. It's equal to the number of pixels in the picture divided by the width of the displayed picture on the device. For example, an 8 x 10" printed picture has a width of 10 inches. If I wanted to take full advantage of my 7.1 MP picture by printing it as an 8x10, then I should look for a printer capable of printing 707,789 pixels/inch. Now I'm pretty sure there's no printer currently capable of this feat.

The example above shows that the rush for more megapixels is not necessarily where consumers or camera manufacturers should be focusing their attention. Most people really only need something around the 3MP range for printouts or display on their monitor screens.

Feb 05, 2008 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-TZ3 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Poor resolution when using internet sites


There is no setting on the camera. I would recommend checking to see what resolution your online site has set for max resolution. Also, make sure that you are not just downloading thumbnails to your computer instead of the actual image file. I really recommend using Microsoft camera scanner wizard to save pictures into a my pictures folder. Have never had any trouble with that program. Hope that helps.

Dec 09, 2007 | Casio EXILIM ZOOM EX-Z60 Digital Camera

3 Answers

Changing Resolution On A Fuji A350 Camera


photos that have been already taken before any changes will not be affected after photo setting.Use camera menu or setup to look for RESOLUTION, PHOTO SETUP, IMAGE TYPE,STANDARD OR TYPE on menu to change photo resolution..

Dec 06, 2007 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Image Expert on Macintosh


Turn ON virtual memory or add more memory to the system. Allocate more memory to the application.

Sep 12, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3100Z Digital Camera

1 Answer

Can I use the IAS with video clips or TIFF formatted pictures?


No. IAS only supports pictures with standard, fine, superfine and Hypict, JPeg formatted pictures.

Sep 12, 2005 | Epson PhotoPC 3100Z Digital Camera

1 Answer

Image quality in low resolution


SHQ1 and HQ are two different levels of compression to make the file smaller. This will have a great impact on the image quality. Generally on Olympus cameras, this is what those letters mean: TIFF (highest (best) quality) generally not used. Files are HUGE and takes a long time for the camera to save the image to the card. SHQ (super high quality) you probably wouldn't be able to tell the difference between this and the TIFF HQ (high quality) which is lower quality than SHQ SQ (standard quality) which is lower quality than HQ SQ1 (standard quality 1) which is lower quality that SQ SQ2 (standard quality 2) which is lower quality that SQ1 A 2048x1536 only seems large because most people have their monitors set to 800x600 or maybe 1024x768 (that's what I have mine set at). This will seem to make the image REALLY LARGE! It only seems that way because you have to scroll around to see the image. If you want to print images, you'll want all the resolution you can get. If you want to display them on your screen (slide show,WEB page) then you don't need large images. You would just need to resize them down. However, since you may want to both, getting a camera with a higher resolution gives you the choice to do either. Usually, the higher resolution cameras have better lenses and generally take better pictures. On my camera (the Oly 2100), I always shoot at the highest resolution and the least amount of compression (SHQ on my camera). This allows me to do almost anything with the image. Nowadays, camera media (smart cards) are fairly cheap, HD's are DIRT cheap and CD-Rs are very cheap. If the images are "keepers", then I personally would want to start with the best image possible and store the images on CD.

Sep 07, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-3040 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

S 5i Question: What are the best settings for quick pics


Hi: Let's go by parts... :) You want to print your photos in 8 x 10 inches without bluring some areas on the picture... in Europe we talk about centimeters. It's something like 20 x 25 centimeters. If you want the picture to be with the best quality for printing, then you have to set your image resolution in, at least, 300 dpi (dots per inch) - this you have to do with software, like Adobe Photoshop CS2. For you to change the resolution of your picture to print with that size without losing any quality, you have to have a picture with, at least, 3000 x 2400 pixels. So, it's better for you to take pictures with the highest quality in your camera, 2560 x 1920, and still you loose some detail. When you have a picture with the resolution 1024 x 768 taken by any normal camera, you will get a resolution of 72 dpi (the same resolution that pictures in the Internet or monitors have. When you print it at your size, 8 x 10 inches, the computer or the printer, one of them is going to change the resolution of your pictures. That process is called "interpolation" and it means that some pixels are generated with middle colors. It's dificult for me to explain the process without showing images but I think that if your search through Google engine you will find lost of pages talking about it... maybe one day I can post in my site about that subject ;) If you have any question about what I tryed to explain just post again ;) Regards

Aug 30, 2005 | Pentax Optio S5i Digital Camera

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