Question about Dell Axim X5 Pocket PC

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Axim 5 upgrade path

Ls the Axim OS fully upgradeable or we'll need to buy hardware again when the next PocketPC? I understand that it may be hard to answer before the new PocketPC OS becomes available, but still there must have been some thought at Dell about this. Would the 32 MB or the 48MB model be any different to upgrade in the future?

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Axim x5 is upgradable to wm2003 and not beyond. It was not freely distributed to Axim users.

Posted on Dec 09, 2008

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Microsoft is well aware of the popularity of the iPAQ 3600 upgrades made available and that is one reason they mandated a Flash ROM with the new Pocket PC 2002 hardware. I am pretty sure MS will make an upgrade path available to the OEMs. It will then be up to Dell, Compaq and friends to make it available to the customer. Dell has always been good about that. As for the ROM size. The current Pocket PC 2002 image is 22MB. I have no idea how big the next one is or even when it will be out! Could be 2003 or 2004. MS has traditionally upgraded every 18 months or so on their PDA OS since 1998. IF that pattern holds true, 18 months from Oct 2001 would be spring 2003. We'll see. Ok, back to the ROM. Most Pocket PC 2002's have a 32MB ROM though a few have a 48. I think the 48 is primarliy to handle a big user file storage area in the ROM. I would be surprised if the next PPC increased more than 45% in size. It could though, but if I had to bet, though, I'd say 32MB would be plenty. Still - I'd look at the 48MB model for other reasons. 33% faster processor, 64MB RAM, included cradle.

Posted on Sep 13, 2005

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I want to install a new motherboard what should i buy


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Upgrade Windows XP to Windows 7 - it can be done!


Windows XP has been around for over 12 years. With that much time in use, there are bound to be situations where exporting data, finding install disks, installing the new OS, reinstalling the program and then restoring the data is not a viable option or is doomed to fail. What can you do if you are faced with this situation? Simply, upgrade the system to Windows 7!
Despite Microsoft's claim that there is no upgrade path from Windows XP to Windows 7, there is a way to make this happen. As a consultant, I am faced with this issue several times a month and fully expect this to rise as more companies transition to Windows 7. The reasons to upgrade the existing system range from legacy databases that cannot easily be exported and imported, software that is permanently associated with the specific PC hardware and software that require a hardware dongle that does not work with newer PC's. Regardless of the reason, there is a way to upgrade Windows XP to Windows 7.
Let me say at this point that the process to upgrade Windows XP to Windows 7 is involved and there are some things you will need to prepare for to make this process successful. If you have Windows XP 64 bit, you can upgrade to Windows 7 64 bit. If you have Windows XP 32 bit (as most installs are), you will have to use Windows 7 32 bit.
Tools you will need:
1. Download Windows Upgrade Advisor
2. External hard drive
3. Windows Vista Business Edition Service Pack 1 (no license needed)
4. Windows 7 Professional with license
The Prep:
As with any major change, you need to create a backup of the existing system. Use your favorite method of backing up the OS, data and system settings (I prefer to use Ghost to get an entire image of the hard drive in a short period of time).
Create the backup of Windows XP:
Before continuing, disconnect all hardware from the PC and uninstall all printers, scanners and any other hardware devices that will need a new Windows 7 driver. This step will save you time troubleshooting a failed device once Windows 7 is installed.
Also, verify the Administrator account log in and password or setup a new local Administrator level user login and password.
Run Windows Upgrade Advisor. This will indicate if there are any software or hardware that is currently in use that absolutely will NOT work with Windows 7. Evaluate all non-compatible software and hardware issue with the user and see if this is a "show stopper".
You can still proceed with the upgrade and see if you can make the software or hardware to work by changing the compatibility settings in Windows 7.
The Process:
With Windows XP running, put the Windows Vista Business disk in and start the upgrade process. When prompted, choose UPGRADE. (This process can take some time so be patient.) Let this finish and the system will reboot. Verify Windows Vista is properly installed by logging in using the local Administrator account.
Reboot Windows Vista at least 2 times, logging in each time, to ensure the new OS is working correctly.
With Windows Vista running, insert the Windows 7 disk and start the upgrade process. Choose the UPGRADE option again and let this complete (again, this will take some time so be patient). Once Windows 7 is installed, the system will reboot. Use the local Administrator account to login and test the OS to ensure it installed properly.
Test everything:
Test everything - log into each program and verify access and functionality. Do not skimp on this step - get the user to log in and watch them run their programs.
Once initial testing is complete, re-install the printers, scanners and other hardware that will need updated drivers to work correctly.
I have followed these steps numerous times and it has worked perfectly each time. Removing the printers and hardware before upgrading will save you time and was a lesson I learned after my first upgrade.

on Nov 09, 2013 | Microsoft Windows 7 Professional for PC

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Upgrade Windows XP to Windows 7 - it is possible!


Windows XP has been around for over 12 years. With that much time in use, there are bound to be situations where exporting data, finding install disks, installing the new OS, reinstalling the program and then restoring the data is not a viable option or is doomed to fail. What can you do if you are faced with this situation? Simply, upgrade the system to Windows 7!

Despite Microsoft's claim that there is no upgrade path from Windows XP to Windows 7, there is a way to make this happen. As a consultant, I am faced with this issue several times a month and fully expect this to rise as more companies transition to Windows 7. The reasons to upgrade the existing system range from legacy databases that cannot easily be exported and imported, software that is permanently associated with the specific PC hardware and software that require a hardware dongle that does not work with newer PC's. Regardless of the reason, there is a way to upgrade Windows XP to Windows 7.

Let me say at this point that the process to upgrade Windows XP to Windows 7 is involved and there are some things you will need to prepare for to make this process successful. If you have Windows XP 64 bit, you can upgrade to Windows 7 64 bit. If you have Windows XP 32 bit (as most installs are), you will have to use Windows 7 32 bit.

Tools you will need:

1. Download Windows Upgrade Advisor
2. External hard drive
3. Windows Vista Business Edition Service Pack 1 (no license needed)
4. Windows 7 Professional with license

The Prep:

As with any major change, you need to create a backup of the existing system. Use your favorite method of backing up the OS, data and system settings (I prefer to use Ghost to get an entire image of the hard drive in a short period of time).

Create the backup of Windows XP:

Before continuing, disconnect all hardware from the PC and uninstall all printers, scanners and any other hardware devices that will need a new Windows 7 driver. This step will save you time troubleshooting a failed device once Windows 7 is installed.

Also, verify the Administrator account log in and password or setup a new local Administrator level user login and password.

Run Windows Upgrade Advisor. This will indicate if there are any software or hardware that is currently in use that absolutely will NOT work with Windows 7. Evaluate all non-compatible software and hardware issue with the user and see if this is a "show stopper".

You can still proceed with the upgrade and see if you can make the software or hardware to work by changing the compatibility settings in Windows 7.

The Process:

With Windows XP running, put the Windows Vista Business disk in and start the upgrade process. When prompted, choose UPGRADE. (This process can take some time so be patient.) Let this finish and the system will reboot. Verify Windows Vista is properly installed by logging in using the local Administrator account.

Reboot Windows Vista at least 2 times, logging in each time, to ensure the new OS is working correctly.

With Windows Vista running, insert the Windows 7 disk and start the upgrade process. Choose the UPGRADE option again and let this complete (again, this will take some time so be patient). Once Windows 7 is installed, the system will reboot. Use the local Administrator account to login and test the OS to ensure it installed properly.

Test everything:

Test everything - log into each program and verify access and functionality. Do not skimp on this step - get the user to log in and watch them run their programs.

Once initial testing is complete, re-install the printers, scanners and other hardware that will need updated drivers to work correctly.

I have followed these steps numerous times and it has worked perfectly each time. Removing the printers and hardware before upgrading will save you time and was a lesson I learned after my first upgrade.

on Nov 09, 2013 | Microsoft Windows XP Professional

3 Answers

I need to buy a product key for windows 7 ultimate


You can buy software from online retailers such as Newegg, or in stores such as BestBuy.

May 05, 2011 | Computers & Internet

1 Answer

Internet and Bluetooth Problems


The issue you have is that the Axim does not have any built in connectivity for networking. In order for the Bluetooth to connect you, you would have to first pair the Axim to a Bluetooth enabled phone that can support Internet connections. Bluetooth on its own can't connect to the Internet, it is a protocol to link devices together.
The easier way would be to buy a wireless 802.11 compact flash card that will support PocketPC and then use a wireless access point to connect to the Internet.

May 11, 2009 | Dell Axim X5 PDA Snap-On Thumb Keyboard...

1 Answer

My computer


Your PC isn't really old at 8 months. Most systems can be upgraded with more memory, a faster processor, larger hard drive, new hardware, and the list goes on. Are you running Windows XP? Windows Vista, is the latest OS from Microsoft, but I understand that XP is still supported. I guess the short answer would be to ask yourself: does it do what you need it to do? For example, I upgraded from my previous PC when I decided to do more stuff with DVD editing, and my old PC was a bit too slow to handle the higher speeds needed for editing video files to DVD's. You might as mentioned ealier in my post inquire about upgrading your PC instead. Figure out the costs, and then compare the costs with those of just buying a new PC. Then after comparing both options make your decision based on what you feel best meets your needs. PS: I still run Windows ME on an Intel Celeron 750 mhz laptop; for what I use it for it still works okay...BNG

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I have a Dell Axim x50v running with original ppc2003. Then I upgraded it to Windows mobile 2005, and used for couple of months then it crashed! Now the issue is both soft & hard reset stop loading at 80%,...


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1 Answer

Windows Mobile 2003 upgrade for Axim x50v


Go to Ebay. Type upgrade Axim X5 and do the search. You will find bunch of softwares to buy. They are cheap, will cost you about $2.

Nov 26, 2007 | Dell Axim X5 Pocket PC

1 Answer

Pls help!


Pocket PC OSes cannot be upgraded to "mainstream" Windows XP or Vista as they are completely different hardware architectures (just like you can't run Windows Mobile on your home PC). In some cases you can upgrade your pocket pc to a more recent version of windows mobile (the OS on the PocketPC). To see if there is an upgrade in Windows Mobile 6.0 (the latest as of this writing), check with acer.

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