Question about Kodak DC4800 Digital Camera

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Dark Images Indoor

My Kodak 4800 is not taking consistently properly exposed photos. Probably 70% of the shots taken indoors are too dark. I've cranked the exposure adjustment as high as it will go (+2) and still get dark shots, often even with the flash. This is my 2nd 4800 camera and I never had this problem with the original one. I am making sure my lithium battery is fully charged....is there an adjustment somewhere else I can make? All suggestions will be much appreciated. Sample photo attached.

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This may sound dumb but is the flash going off? The second thought is how far are your subjects from the on camera flash. As you're probably aware, the flash is challenged as the distance doubles; half the light at twice the distance from any point. An equivalent example; f/4.0 @ 1/125th of a second worth of light at ten feet but you'd have only half the light available at twenty feet. So you'd have to change either your f/stop or shutter speed by one stop to either f/2.8 or 1/60th of a second. This is why the distance is so important. I don't see a hot spot on your subject matter so I'm guessing the flash isn't going off. Could be wrong as you're there so you'd know.

Posted on Sep 13, 2005

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PICTURES ARE BLACK


6 Ways To Fix Too Bright and Too Dark Photos

Recompose The Photo This is probably the simplest solution. When taking a photo of a scene with very bright and very dark parts, move your camera to eliminate one of the extremes. In the case of the band, I would have either closed the curtains for the shot, or recomposed completely and photographed from the window looking at the band, and the crowd behind.
Use Exposure Lock If you can't recompose the photograph, instead tell the camera what part of the image you would like to see. The rest of the photo will be either over or under exposed (too bright or too dark) but at least you will see your subject. You can dothis by placing the center of the image at your subject; half depressing the shutter to lock the focus and exposure; move the camera to re-compose the image; and fully depressing the shutter.
In the band image, the camera chose to correctly expose the scene outside, but even if the band member had been correctly exposed, the window would have ended up being over exposed and you would just have seen white.
Some cameras have an option called 'spot metering' to set the part of the image you'd like to be correctly exposed. If your camera has this setting, enable it before using the technique above.
Use Fill In Flash If your scene has a sunny background, but your subject is in the shade (or has a hat on), turn on the flash (as I explained way back in tip number 9 - Using Flash During The Day). I know it seems wrong but it really does work! By using the flash, your subject will look as bright as the background. This would have worked well for the child shot above.
High Dynamic Range Imaging This technique is not for the faintof hearted. It requires a subject that does not move; a good camera with the capability to set the exposure and output RAW images. A tripod and image editing software like Photoshop CS3 are also needed.
High Dynamic Range Imaging (or HDR for short) is a technique for placing both very dark and very light areas in the same photo. It requires you to take a number of photographs of thesame scene - each with a different exposure. First take the shot using the camera's recommended settings. Then, in manual mode and keeping the aperture at the same value as the first shot, take a sequence of shots - each shot having a different shutter speed (above and below the original). You'll have 5-9 shots of the same scene all in different exposures.
hdrunder.jpghdrmean.jpghdrover.jpg
Merging the three images to the left creates the HDR image below. Thanks to Photomatix for the images.
hdrmerged.jpgNow import these into your favorite paint program. I use Photoshop, but you can as easily use a cheaper program designed specifically for HDR photos like Photomatix. Follow the HDR directions and the paint program will merge these images into one great looking shot!
Use a Filter If your scene is of a brightsky and a dark ground (for instance at sunset, or on a cloudy day), you can use a graduated neutral density filter. This filter cuts out someof the light from one part of the photo (the sky). This will correctly expose the ground and the sky without needing to use HDR. These filterscan be complex to setup, so I don't usually recommend them for beginners.
Fix The Original Photo in an Image Editing Program twobright2.jpgFinally, if you can't take another shot at the same location, you can fix the original image by changing the levels using a paint program. This works best when your subject is darker than the rest of the photo (because cameras lose detail in over-bright areas). I've brightened the band member in the top image using this technique and while it looks okay in thissmall shot, this technique can tend to amplify any noise in the image. The darker the subject, the harder time you will have fixing the image.
I discuss exactly how to use this technique in lesson 2 of my free Image Editing Secrets course. I have a tutorial for Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Paint Shop Pro and the free Google Picassa.
- See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/140/6-ways-to-fix-too-bright-and-too-dark-photos/#sthash.58eENOTt.dpuf

Jul 09, 2014 | Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

What setting should I use for the following photo situation. I won a window coverings company and I take pictures of finished installations to show to clients. I am shooting during the day usually. I...


See your manual, page 54 and 55, 64, and also page 70 here. Would suggest trying indoor and portrait mode first (page 54 and 55), with the flash set to ON always (page 64). If your not satisfied with the results, try Program auto-exposure mode, and adjusting exposure compensation (page 70).

Jul 09, 2011 | Canon PowerShot SX210 IS Digital Camera

4 Answers

When i take picture,the picture is white n some time become very very bright, but if take video is ok.


this can be usually associated with your white balance in still camera mode.
Check to see your white balance is set correctly or just set it to auto. Also make sure the mode you are in it set. (ie. indoor, outdoor, auto, speed)

May 04, 2011 | Canon PowerShot A460 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Orange blue lines, image over exposed for outdoor shots


Hi,
You might have chosen either to fast an ISO (i.e. 800 or 1600) or you have too much light entering the lens (sensor) in other words the automatic exposure is turned off manually or there is a fault, check first the menu options as a rough guide you should have the ISO set around 200 - 400 the aperture set around F6.3 to 8 with a shutter speed at 200 ish, all this depends on the brightness of the day but if you have auto exposure on which every new camera would have these days then that is all taken care of. Try different SCN and ISO to see if problem still persists. If the problem is intermitted, try to find a pattern in to when the faulty pictures appear.

Or else try to remove the memory card. Turn On camera without memory card, now press menu button and go to setup menu and under setup menu please look for format then press Ok, under format please format the internal memory. Now if you already reformat the internal memory, take atleast 3 pictures on a same subject, then hit review if the lines appeared on both pictures on same location, it means camera needs of service please call Kodak toll free 1 800 235 6325., For U.S and canada support.
Thank you!

May 17, 2010 | Kodak EasyShare Z612 Digital Camera

1 Answer

My nikon D60 is taking dark photos.


The only reason the camera will be taking dark photos is when it is under exposing the image taken. This can be due to the exposure compensation set to under expose the metered exposure. Make sure the expsosure compensation is set to '0' or increase it to compensate for the dark photos.

Also inaccurately metering a scene (such as a high contrast scene) can easily fool the meter into under exposing, especially outdoors.

Jan 03, 2010 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera with 18-55mm +...

1 Answer

What is the best setting for taking photos through glass.i have a olympus sp-590uz .ive only had the caamera a few days any help would be great


Photography through glass isn't difficult if you know a few guidelines.
If you're indoors in a museum, or aquarium etc, it would be best to turn the flash off. This will eliminate the flash reflecting into your photos.
If you need to use a flash, make sure you're not squared on the glass. IF you're at a direct, 90 degree angle from the glass, that's when the flash will reflect off the glass and back into your lens. An angle between 50-70 degrees will all the light from the flash to illuminate the subject on the opposiite side of the glass without reflecting.
You're camera has a high megapixel resolution so you can get great color and detail. If you use the zoom feature, you'll need to hold the camera very steady or if possible, use a tripod.
Another technique that alot of photographers use is called "bracketing" . Many of the newer digitals have a setting that will allow you to do this. Bracketing is simply taking 2 or more photos of the same image with slight exposure setting changes being the only difference between each shot. For example, one shot would be normal exposure, one would be a step or two over-exposed, and another would be a step or two under-exposed.
Many of the cameras will take the 3 shots all together-check your owner's manual for specifics.
With these simple techniques, you'll look like an ace!
K

Sep 18, 2009 | Cameras

1 Answer

Background is overexposed


So, the problem doesn't seem to be the flash if the actual subject in the foreground is exposed properly. My guess is that the background is being lit by another light source. Typically, your camera uses a flash for dark areas or what it gauges as a dark area. This doesn't adjust the background for additional light sources. For example, if you're standing outside and there's a tree covering someone that you're taking a picture of your flash will adjust to "properly" light that individual. However, because the flash was used for the main subject, the background is actually now overexposed. The overexposed background will show up as a brightly lit area because the camera had to adjust for the foreground. This will actually reverse itself when it's dark out - meaning if the background and foreground are dark, the flash will expose the foreground, but the background will be black. Hopefully, that helps you understand lighting and exposure. Now, to fix this problem when shooting, you would need to consider several options - 1. SLR camera with aperture and f-stop settings as well as compensation controls. This will allow you to control every element of the exposure, but you still need to be aware of the lighting behind the "subject" to properly expose your shots. 2. backlighting compensation - common settings on both SLR and point and shoot cameras that makes auto lighting conversions for backlighting and other common lighting issues. Test whatever options are on your camera to see what works best for your specific problem. 3. Photoshop retouching - you may take one shot with your subject exposed properly and a second shot with the background then merge the images together. 4. using a tripod to shoot without using the flash - this may give you the closest exposure to exactly what you see when looking at your subject.

Dec 19, 2008 | Polaroid i733LP Digital Camera

1 Answer

Poor quality photographs


I think this is down to your choice of lens. If you have the kit lens, it is pretty poor unless in bright sunlight. You could try keeping the shutter open longer using AV+/- or increasing the ISO but this increases the chance of a blurry photo. Remember the sensor on the Canon is huge compared to the Kodak - so more light will need to enter the lens to expose it properly. This is why SLR lenses are huge compared to compact cameras.

Aug 25, 2008 | Canon EOS Rebel G 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

Over-exposure with AF Nikkor 70-300 telephoto


Friends have you tried not using the A-Aperture mode?? Set in on P-for Program or M-for Manual, this should produce the colors you are hoping for. If your photo is still "hot" use the + or - button called the Exposure compensation button on the top of the camera, push that little button and turn the outside main control dial where your right thumb sits 1 third stop at a time, (you have 4 to 5) The + adds light to your photo and the - will make your photos darker play with that and let me know. Barry Brown www.coralreefphotos.com

Jun 26, 2008 | Nikon D70s Digital Camera

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