Question about Fuji FinePix S7000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Black Spot

Hi all! I get a little dark area that appears on my images (upper left corner) when i photograph using small appertures - f8, f6.3. The same image taken with a larger apperture - f2.8 f4, does not have this area, or rather it is less pronounced. I always see this dark area on my LCD display - when i point camera toward bright subjects it becomes denser, when i point camera at low-lit subjects, the area dissolves and becomes almost not visible. Do i have burnt pixels? Does anyone know what this is? I searched the forum for this and didnt find anything. Any response is appreciated!

Posted by on

1 Answer

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Vice President:

    An expert whose answer got voted for 100 times.

  • Master
  • 779 Answers
Re: Black Spot

Dead Pixel Test This free utility enables you to easily test your digital camera for dead and hot pixels. http://www.starzen.com/imaging/deadpixeltest.htm

Posted on Apr 14, 2007

Add Your Answer

0 characters

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...
3 Points

Related Questions:

1 Answer

PICTURES ARE BLACK


6 Ways To Fix Too Bright and Too Dark Photos

Recompose The Photo This is probably the simplest solution. When taking a photo of a scene with very bright and very dark parts, move your camera to eliminate one of the extremes. In the case of the band, I would have either closed the curtains for the shot, or recomposed completely and photographed from the window looking at the band, and the crowd behind.
Use Exposure Lock If you can't recompose the photograph, instead tell the camera what part of the image you would like to see. The rest of the photo will be either over or under exposed (too bright or too dark) but at least you will see your subject. You can dothis by placing the center of the image at your subject; half depressing the shutter to lock the focus and exposure; move the camera to re-compose the image; and fully depressing the shutter.
In the band image, the camera chose to correctly expose the scene outside, but even if the band member had been correctly exposed, the window would have ended up being over exposed and you would just have seen white.
Some cameras have an option called 'spot metering' to set the part of the image you'd like to be correctly exposed. If your camera has this setting, enable it before using the technique above.
Use Fill In Flash If your scene has a sunny background, but your subject is in the shade (or has a hat on), turn on the flash (as I explained way back in tip number 9 - Using Flash During The Day). I know it seems wrong but it really does work! By using the flash, your subject will look as bright as the background. This would have worked well for the child shot above.
High Dynamic Range Imaging This technique is not for the faintof hearted. It requires a subject that does not move; a good camera with the capability to set the exposure and output RAW images. A tripod and image editing software like Photoshop CS3 are also needed.
High Dynamic Range Imaging (or HDR for short) is a technique for placing both very dark and very light areas in the same photo. It requires you to take a number of photographs of thesame scene - each with a different exposure. First take the shot using the camera's recommended settings. Then, in manual mode and keeping the aperture at the same value as the first shot, take a sequence of shots - each shot having a different shutter speed (above and below the original). You'll have 5-9 shots of the same scene all in different exposures.
hdrunder.jpghdrmean.jpghdrover.jpg
Merging the three images to the left creates the HDR image below. Thanks to Photomatix for the images.
hdrmerged.jpgNow import these into your favorite paint program. I use Photoshop, but you can as easily use a cheaper program designed specifically for HDR photos like Photomatix. Follow the HDR directions and the paint program will merge these images into one great looking shot!
Use a Filter If your scene is of a brightsky and a dark ground (for instance at sunset, or on a cloudy day), you can use a graduated neutral density filter. This filter cuts out someof the light from one part of the photo (the sky). This will correctly expose the ground and the sky without needing to use HDR. These filterscan be complex to setup, so I don't usually recommend them for beginners.
Fix The Original Photo in an Image Editing Program twobright2.jpgFinally, if you can't take another shot at the same location, you can fix the original image by changing the levels using a paint program. This works best when your subject is darker than the rest of the photo (because cameras lose detail in over-bright areas). I've brightened the band member in the top image using this technique and while it looks okay in thissmall shot, this technique can tend to amplify any noise in the image. The darker the subject, the harder time you will have fixing the image.
I discuss exactly how to use this technique in lesson 2 of my free Image Editing Secrets course. I have a tutorial for Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, Paint Shop Pro and the free Google Picassa.
- See more at: http://www.digital-photo-secrets.com/tip/140/6-ways-to-fix-too-bright-and-too-dark-photos/#sthash.58eENOTt.dpuf

Jul 09, 2014 | Nikon D3000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

There is black dot in left upper corner, every time i take picture of sky dot is there, it's not a lens cause i try different one, same result, any idea why?


Common problem, easy solution. It is dust on the chip.
At first try to blow the spot away on the image chip. Don't use your mouth or air, but use the airblaster.
And there are special swap stick which can help. Go to a photodealer, they will have the swaps. If you don't trust yourself, it's on the image chip, let the shop do it.

Sep 07, 2010 | Nikon D200 Digital Camera

1 Answer

It's a small black spot near the bottom left. It


it sounds like a small pieces of dirt got inside the photo mechanism and may need to be clean proffesionally

Jul 21, 2010 | Canon PowerShot SD1100 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Why is the LCD screen white? even when pictures are being taken it also appears white. What can be the possible cause and solution for this?


Well, check what mode you are using. If it's MANUAL, maybe you are using the wrong apperture/speed/iso settings for the light conditions. The picture is being made as you are ordering (with wrong settings), causing a too clear image getting recorded (overexposure); sometimes the overexposure is so extreme that a "all white" image appears on the screen.

Try changing the mode for APPERTURE PRIORITY, SPEED PRIORITY or PROGRAM (A, S or P respectivelly), so the camera will try to compensate the other variables for the correct exposure.

If so, don't give up using the MANUAL mode (which is the best one, in my opinion). Only try to learn a little more about exposure and camera's controls.

Feb 08, 2010 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Canon power shot sd1000 black dot on lens


If by saying the upper right corner of the lens you really mean that there is a dark spot on each image AND the rear display, there may be dirt or dust on the lens itself. Clean the lens with an optical quality cleaner. Do not use paper towels and Windex or the like - as paper towels can scratch the lens.

It is also possible that the dark spot is a "stuck pixel" on the image sensor inside the camera. There is no way to repair a stuck pixel outside of replacing the sensor. Any dark spot (regardless of source) can be edited out by using image editing software. This will allow you to to make the dark spot less noticeable - or practically invisible.

If the dark spot is on the rear display only, it can also be a result of a "stuck pixel" on the display itself. This should not show up an images, but only on the display. There is little that can be done outside of replacing the entire rear screen.

There are other things that can cause these problems, but those listed above are the most common.

I hope this was Very Helpful and good luck!


Nov 20, 2009 | Canon PowerShot SD1000 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Black area in photograph


Unless you are using high-end Nikon Speedlights with camera and flash set for Auto FP High-Speed Sync, your top flash sync shutter speed on the D80 is 1/200 second. The black band you are seeing at faster shutter speeds is because the second curtain of the shutter begins to close before the first curtain reaches the fully-open position (which is when the flash fires). The higher the shutter speed, the shorter the gap between first and second curtains. To get full exposure with flash, there must be an instant when the shutter is fully open -- first curtain completed travel, second curtain not started yet.

"As the speed increases the final image should get lighter" applies to ISO speed. Higher shutter speeds mean less light reaching the sensor, but that's not the cause of the black bands.

Mar 22, 2009 | Nikon D80 Digital Camera with 18-135mm...

1 Answer

Flashing shadow area on olympus e500


While in playback mode, image is blinking, the word shadow appears in lower right hand corner, use the info button repeatedly until all disappears and image is pure.

Mar 25, 2008 | Olympus EVOLT E-500 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Camera shakes when turned on and when taking a picture there is a black area in upper left corner


This soundfs like a Zoom lens element problem May be expensive to get fixed Check out customer support

Jul 31, 2007 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z6 Digital Camera

1 Answer

What is the difference in metering among multi-segment, spot, and center-weighted?


Multi-segment metering uses 256 segments to measure luminance and color. This data is combined with distance information to calculate the camera exposure. This advanced metering system will accurate worry-free exposures in almost all situations including backlight condition. Spot metering uses a small circle area within the middle of image to calculate the exposure. The spot allows precise exposure measurements of a particular object without being influenced by extremely bright or dark areas within the scene. Center weighted measures light values over the entire image area with emphasis given in the central region. In backlight condition or when the subject is not in the center of image, exposure compensation will be required.

Sep 13, 2005 | Konica Minolta DiMAGE Z3 Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Fuji FinePix S7000 Digital Camera Logo

Related Topics:

94 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Fuji Digital Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

92728 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers

Richard Roberts

Level 2 Expert

198 Answers

Are you a Fuji Digital Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...