Question about Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-F828 Digital Camera

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F828 and ISO question

If set the aperture on my F828 to F2.2 and raise the ISO setting from 64 to 400, will the shutter speed increase or decrease when shooting on a sunny day? Thanks Richard Cooper

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Re: F828 and ISO question

If you're in shutter-priority mode, yes, the shutter speed will increase. If you're in manual mode, it won't do anything until you set it manually. Just remember that, for any given exposure, shutter speed and f-stop are inversely proportional. Higher fStop, lower shutter speed. Lower f-Stop, higher shutter speed. And that the higher the f-stop, the smaller the aperture. On the F828, f2.0 is largest aperture (most light), f8 is smallest aperture (least light). ISO, on the other hand, is an approximation of film speed. In reality, however, raising the ISO just amplifies the signal downstream from the sensor - but the net effect is the same as lowering the f-stop (bigger aperture), which allows you to have a faster shutter speed for the same exposure. Hope this helps...

Posted on Sep 12, 2005

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Re: F828 and ISO question

Because you are (a) opening the lens aperture to let in the maximum light and (b) making the sensor more sensitive so that it requires less light, so the camera must do what it can to counter your settings - to reduce the light by minimizing the time of the exposure. I presume this is a hypothetical question, as you don't normally want to use ISO this high with the F828 if it can be avoided.

Posted on Sep 12, 2005

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1 Answer

How to fix slow shutter speed?


When in Any auto mode or P or A your camera automatically will adjust your shutter speed for ambient light conditions. So if your having issues where your camera is choosing to slow a shutter speed and you photos are coming out blurry then there isn't enough light either because other settings in the camera are limiting light or where ever you are taking photos is poorly lit. Setting your ISO Higher should allow the camera to increase the shutter speed, but will often introduce noise to your photos. The more you play with your camera and learn digital photography the more you'll understand how to make your photos the best they possibly can be. For the time being if getting a no blurr shot is key put your camera in S mode which means shutter priority this will allow you to control and lock your shutter speed and set your ISO to auto this will force the ISO and Aperture to change instead of your shutter speed to get a good photo.

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Pics too dark


decrease shutter speed, increase aperture size (lower F-stop), and/or increase ISO.

Mar 28, 2014 | Canon EOS Rebel XSi Digital Camera

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How do I set the Iso and flash


ISO is the sensitivity to light. The lower numbers 80, 100, 200 are the LEAST sensitive (but provide the best looking pictures). Sensitivity has to do with the amount of light needed to properly expose an image. ISO is a part of exposure that works with Aperture (f stop) and shutter speed (in seconds - or fractional seconds). Here's how it looks:

steve_con_63.jpg

The graphic above shows that varying either of these three values changes the exposure. If you change one by one step, you have to change one of the others by one step to get about the same exposure result. Each of the step values on your camera for the shutter, aperture and ISO is twice as much as the previous value. ISO 1600 is 2x ISO 800, which is 2x ISO 400, and 2x ISO 200 and finally, 2x ISO 100 (some cameras go to ISO 50 or less!).

The shutter works the same way: 1/1000 is 2x faster than 1/500, and 2x 1/125, and 2x 1/60, and 2 x 1/30, etc. These are easy to see the how each is twice as much as the other.

Finally, the aperture. Each "f stop" allows 2x as much light as the previous value. f2 lets 2x as much light as f2.8, which lets in 2x as much as f4, etc. I know the number don't double like you would expect, and the smaller numbers allow more light (you'd think it was the other way around) - but it's because we're talking about a circular lenses and it has to do with how we calculate area of a circle (3.14 x R squared). It may be easier to recall small numbers = equal large openings by thinking of f numbers with a "1/" over them - like this: 1/f1.4, or 1/f2, 1/f2.8, etc. Here's a chart that shows how aperture and shutter speed work together at one ISO setting.

steve_con_64.jpg

Read them across, the top line shows that 1/250 @ f1.4 is the SAME as 1/125 @ f2.0, which is also the SAME as shooting 1/60 @ 2.8, etc. If you were to increase the by one step, the shutter speeds would increase by a factor of two. Twice as much light by opening the aperture by a single stop means you must halve the exposure time or halve the ISO value. Likewise, if it's too dark to get a decent picture; increase exposure time or ISO value to capture enough light.

Assume a properly exposed picture requires 1/30 of a second at f5.6 with ISO 200. If the camera was increased by one step to ISO 400, you can take the picture a f5.6 still but in 1/60 sec - greatly reducing the chance of blur from holding the camera in you hand. You could even go up one more step to ISO 400 and shoot in 1/125 sec, which would reduce the blur even more. Fast shutter speeds reduce the "camera shake" and stop motion in sports photography - or other moving objects. If you had the camera set up on a tripod, you could dial the ISO down to ISO 100 and shoot at 1/30 of a sec at f5.6. If your lens can open up to f4, you can shoot in half the time because the lens is letting in twice the light. Some point and shoot cameras don't allow changing f stops or even shutter speeds - so all you can do it raise and lower ISO.

Which camera and flash do you have?

May 23, 2011 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

I'm having problems with the settings on my Canon EOS 400D. When I take pictures in AV mode I can get quality pictures but in TV or M modes the pictures always come out so dark even when taking them...


You need to understand the relationship and teractivity of aperture, shutter speed and iso. In Av mod, you choose the aperture and the camera makes thw shutter speed agjustment, In Tv mode, you set the shutter speed and the camera makes the aperture adjustment, In manual, you have to set both shutter speed and aperture manually. If the ISO mode is set to AUTO, the camera chooses the sensors sensitivity to light automatically. Change to specific ISO
(200-400 for daylight and 799-1600 for night). Take a picture in AV mode and note what shutter speed the camera chose. Then switch to TC mode choose the same shutter speed and see if camera chose the same aperture(f-stop) you chose in first shot. Change to Manual and choose same f-stop and shutter speed the camera chose for you in the other modes. Compare all three photos. They should be almost if not exactly the same exposure wise.
In Tv mode choose a dlowers shutter speed, In Manual choose a combo of slower shuuter and wider f-stop(smaller number). Read your manual.

Jan 02, 2011 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

How do I make my shutter speed faster?


Shutterspeed depends on 3 things: the amount of available light, the aperture (lens opening) and the ISO setting.
Every full step you can open the aperture (like from F8 to F5,6) will half the shutterspeed. And every time you double the ISO, the shutterspeed will half. Raising the ISO will increase the noise in the picture.
Mode P, S, A and M will allow you to make these settings manually. If you use the N mode, the camera will do most of these things by itselves.

May 03, 2010 | Fuji FinePix S1000FD Digital Camera

1 Answer

Delay between pressing the shutter button and the camera firing. Canon40d


Not sure what you are really asking here as it would depend on the settings you have selected to use.

For instance if your ISO ) ASA film speed) is set to 64 and you have an aperture priority setting of say 6 then the shutter will go clllllllllickkkkk ( be slow say 1/30th of a second. As opposed to say ISO of 200 and an aperture of 16 the camera will go cliick now if you select ISO 400 and aperture of 16 the camera will clk This is the "sports type setting for fast moving objects ) I am presuming daylight average light for the above
after 4pm or in some shade areas shutter speed can also be delayed and the picture result is blurred due to camera shake at low speeds.
then u need a tripod

Now what have you selected as an amateur snapshot artist?
Day night settings
AUTO
ISO 100 + ........
portratit
landscape
night

Any of these settings on auto will also be delayed depending on ISO and the amount of ambiant light available to the camera. So you need to get to know your cameraq by practice

Some settings ( see manual) suggest using shutter priority to get good pics
Others suggest aperture priority.

It might be better for you to get a basic digital photography book to help you understand and compose good pics ( Digital photography for dummies ( or DP basics)


Hers a tip worth remembering with apertures

Smaller the number larger the hole(aperture)
Larger the number smaller the aperture

larger hole for lower light
smaller hole for very bright light

so experiment with aperture to be familiar on what to select for the degree of light then test different ISO speeds and keep notes.

When you use zoom increase the EV by 1+ and see what the difference is to standard distance

All great fun and learning and now cheaper because you dont have to pay for film or development to see what creative pics you have made!

So perhaps the camera does not have a problem, it just has you, and

you need to bond so Good Luck and ,many happy snappy hours of fun


Please rate my help++++Thanks for using FIXYA

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1 Answer

Blurry action pictures!


This Powershot A590 camera has a Kids and Pets mode that may help. If that doesn't work, you need to set your camera to Shutter Priority (TV) mode on the dial. Then you use the arrows to increase or decrease the shutter speed setting. Depending on the sport/action, your shutter may need to be 1/400 up to 1/1000 or higher.

You may find you don't have enough light to get a fast shutter speed at the standard ISO, so you may also need to increase the ISO. Only increase it as much as needed to get your shots, and don't forget to return it to a lower ISO when you are done. You set the ISO from the Func/Set button menu.

You will have a relatively shallow area of focus (called depth of field) unless you have a LOT of light and are using a relatively slower shutter (e.g. 1/400 vs 1/1000). So be sure to keep the center of the focus on the player you are shooting.

Check your user manual for instructions on how to change to the AV mode and how to set the ISO. If you don't have your user manual, you can download it here, from Canon.

Finally, this type of camera tends to have a lot of "shutter lag" between when you press the shutter and when it takes the photo. You need to plan ahead and press the shutter in advance of the "peak action" when you want to capture the photo.

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1 Answer

Aperture Priority Mode - an undocumented feature


In addition to the "quirks" of the Landscape and Aperture Priority Modes (neither mode works as documented!)..... The camera also behaves differently in full Manual Mode (it changes the settings, whether you want it to or not to compensate for available light)... At lower Zoom Levels, the camera will adjust the Shutter Speed Only, to try and compensate for available light... For example: with the Camera preset to F5.6 Aperture, and 1/48 sec. shutter speed, the camera will adjust the shutter speed between a range of 1/30 to 1/291 sec, to try and "auto expose" the shot for lower or higher light levels, even though you're in manual mode. At an Aperture Setting of 2.8 and 1/48 of a second, the number of internal steps in shutter speed the camera is willing to take, increases dramatially - for example: shutter speeds up to 1/600 of a second, even though you have the shutter set to 1/48 in manual mode. The camera WILL NOT attempt to adjust the Aperture to compensate for proper exposure in available light (OR WILL IT??).... It depends on your Zoom settings! It won't if your're near to full wide angle, but IT WILL if you are using the Zoom. Once you cross some unknown zoom threshold (it doesn't have to be at full zoom), then the camera begins to change both the Aperture and Shutter speed to compensate for available light, even though you are in "Full Manual", versus Auto Exposure Mode. In Manual Mode, (as in Aperture Priority Mode), the amount of change the camera is willing to make to your settings, appears to be related to a preset number of internal steps, with the number of steps dependent on both Aperture and Zoom Settings, before it gives an EV Warning for Over or Under Exposure conditions.... The type (shutter speed only for wide angle, shutter and aperture for zoom) and amount (number of internal "steps" it takes to increase/decrease shutter speed and increase or decrease aperture), is dependent on the amount of zoom you are using for the current shot.

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