Question about Epson PhotoPC 3000Z Digital Camera

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Why do my pictures look too dark?

Why do my pictures look too dark (underexposed)?

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You may need to use the flash. Make sure the setting is not flash off. If you're using the flash, make sure your subject is within the range of 14 feet for wide angle shots or 11 feet for telephoto shots. Use Image Expert to adjust the picture's brightness and contrast. Try adjusting the camera's exposure or sensitivity settings (use the Manual user mode). If you're taking pictures in the Manual user mode, look for the EV! warning that appears on your LCD screen when you are taking pictures out of the ideal exposure range. If you have trouble setting both the aperture and shutter speed manually, try adjusting the aperture and letting the camera choose the shutter speed with Aperture Priority mode. If you're using the macro mode to take a close-up photo, be sure to provide adequate lighting for your subject. If you're taking a picture at night and you want to light up the background as well as your subject, use the camera's slow synchronized flash mode. If you need more light, attach an optional external flash to the camera's hot shoe.

Posted on Sep 12, 2005

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1 Answer

The image looks dark


The finished image looks dark or it looks dark in the viewfinder?
If your question is "the image looks dark" in the viewfinder my answer is it's an F4.5 lens so letting less light into the viewfinder and it will look dark. The big difference will be seen if you are coming from lets say a Nikon 50mm F1.8 which is two stops faster then your F4.5.
If it's the finished picture after you taken it I'd say you underexposed the shot.

Dec 10, 2010 | Nikon Nikkor 55-200mm f/4.5-5.6 G AF-S...

1 Answer

Faces show up dark and unrecognizable


How far away are the faces? The flash on a typical point and shoot camera has a very short operating range, typically 3 to 15 feet. If something appears in the picture ahead of the faces, the flash will shut down prematurely and underexpose the faces.

Aug 12, 2009 | HP Photosmart R847 Digital Camera

1 Answer

LCD screen is very dark, Pictures taken are underexposed


call CANON it is a known problem they will do it FREE just call them see link for sample service advisory dont worry if ur model is not there just call and ask them about BAD CCD

Kindly rate me WELL !

May 31, 2009 | Canon PowerShot A640 Digital Camera

1 Answer

LCD screen is very dark, Pictures taken are underexposed


If the pictures show up normal on the computer then the back light for the LCD is going bad.

Apr 05, 2009 | Canon PowerShot A640 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Dark pictures


If it has the option to control exposure, it is probably set to underexpose

Dec 29, 2007 | Canon PowerShot A560 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Problem with underexposed pictures


I've got the same problem with my new ef 500 dg super and my ef 530 dg super. It occurs on all nikon camera's I could get.
D70, D80 and Fuji S5 Pro. I don't have this problem with an old (4 years) sigma ef 500 dg super.
I will try to contact Sigma for this problem.

Nov 01, 2007 | Sigma EF-500 DG for TTL Flash

1 Answer

Dark pictures


Be sure that you are capturing images in the right shooting mode. For example, if shooting a night scene your image will be underexposed and dark if the image is captured in the Program Auto mode for regular photography, or in any mode other than Night Scene. Be careful that when capturing images, nothing is obstructing the flash.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus D-535 Zoom / C370 Zoom Digital...

1 Answer

Dark pictures


Be sure that you are capturing images in the right shooting mode. For example, if shooting a night scene your image will be underexposed and dark if the image is captured in the Program Auto mode for regular photography, or in any mode other than Night Scene. Be careful that when capturing images, nothing is obstructing the flash.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia D-435 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Dark pictures


Be sure that you are capturing images in the right shooting mode. For example, if shooting a night scene your image will be underexposed and dark if the image is captured in the Program Auto mode for regular photography, or in any mode other than Night Scene. Be careful that when capturing images, nothing is obstructing the flash.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia D-425 / C-170 Digital...

1 Answer

Pictures are underexposed


When you are photographing scenes with mostly light objects (for example, snow, water, and sand), the picture is usually underexposed (darker than it really is). The camera meter registers the brightness of the scene and tries to set the camera lens and aperture for an exposure based on average brightness levels (18% reflectance) causing it to underexpose, as in the following picture. When you are photographing scenes with mostly dark objects (for example, shade, shadow, and overcast skies), and very few light objects, the camera may overexpose the image, causing it to be too light. If you have a flash on your camera, you can compensate by adding "fill flash" for some extra light. If your camera has an exposure compensation adjustment, you can increase or decrease the exposure to correct for these exposure problems. Increase the number to make the image lighter, and decrease the number to make the image darker. You may want to try a series of shots with different exposure compensation adjustments to get a feel for how much difference these adjustments make.

Aug 29, 2005 | Kodak EasyShare CX7530 Digital Camera

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