Question about Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-D770 Digital Camera

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Focusing the 770

Could someone tell me if there is merit to focusing the 770 by first zooming in on the subject, then zooming out to compose your picture? Or does the focus change as a result of the zooming? I'm just trying to refine the process. Thanks, Tom

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Re: Focusing the 770

I've only had my 770 a couple of days now. I answered your question on gut instinct and not intelligence. Your initial question...."does the focus change as a result of the zooming? " the answer is Yes. The zoom lens on the 770 is a "variable focal length" design as opposed to a "true zoom". A "true zoom" holds its focus as the lens is zoomed. While a variable focal length design requires refocsuing after the lens is zoomed. Sony uses a CPU-driven focus system to automatically adjust the lens' focus as the zoom ring is turned--- yet appears to be a "true zoom" to the user. So when we focus the 770 in a manual mode and then change the zoom length....you need to touch up focus. This info from a review at the following site. http://www/imaging-resource.com

Posted on Sep 11, 2005

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Re: Focusing the 770

Tom-- I shot TV news video for 20 years..... Focusing on Professional level Video cameras is still manual. The customary technique (where possible) is to zoom tight on the principle subject matter, *focus* and then return to the framing you prefer. The camera"s lens system doesn't care. This procedure is largely for your own confidence that the visual target is in focus. It's a manual form of the EZ-Focus function on the 770 LCD. (which I like just to reinforce my belief that I have attained proper focus.--- Would I use EZ-Focus only for a critical picture? Probably not. Gimme optics every time.)-----

Posted on Sep 11, 2005

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Re: Focusing the 770

Tom, It's best to do the zoom first, then focus (if you are using the autofocus).

Posted on Sep 11, 2005

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Barring a malfunction with your len's autofocusing mechanism, the problem that you're experiencing is likely due to the limitations of the camera's focusing / zoom range in Macro mode.

You didn't say what ranges you were shooting from but basically, in order to get proper focus, you must first make sure you're within the proper lens to subject distance for the macro mode that you've chosen.

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