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E-mailing photos In what format should I save my digital photos in order to e-mail them or post them to the Web?

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Re: E-mailing photos

JPEG format storage is ideal for posting your photos to the Internet and for e-mailing them to friends. (It’s also useful for archiving when you've finished editing them and need to save storage space.) The compressed images still look good on-screen and contain a relatively large amount of information in the shrunken file. JPEG storage is great for maximizing space but not for maintaining image quality. If you want to get smaller files for archiving, use minimal JPEG compression (high quality/low compression). The ideal compression is lossless, which means there's no discernible drop in image quality even though the file size has decreased.

Posted on Sep 08, 2005

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Photos to big to import to some sites from my sony digital DSC-WX9 camera


You can use just about any photo editing program to reduce the resolution of the photos. For example, in Windows Photo Gallery select "E-mail" from the menu.
If you know you're not going to do anything but email the photos, you can reduce the resolution in the camera so as to create smaller photos in the first place using the Still Image Size command in the Shooting menu. However, if you happen to take a great photo you won't be able to make a good print of it because it's too small.

Mar 05, 2012 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-WX9 Digital Camera

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How do I E-Mail Photos from my Olympus fe-290 on a dell laptop with winows vista. I do have the USB cord, thanks you


method 1 without photo management software:

To e-mail pictures from your camera with your laptop just hook up the camera to your laptop
and widows should come up with a menu asking you what you want to do with this device.
choose open folder to view files this should make the cameras media show up on the desktop.
You should also be able to see the media on the camera under my computer removable storage.
Or if it shows up here as a camera just right click and choose explore device. With most cameras
thier should be a folder called DCIM your pictures should be in this directory. Some cameras may
have subdirectories like video and thumnails in this directory also.

Once you've found the pictures, open you e-mail client or web mail and create a new e-mail. Open the attachment button. this should bring up a file manager that will allow you to find your pictures and select the ones you want to send. Some e-mail programs will have a white clipboard area beside the attachment button. If the e-mail client your using does, then you can just drag and drop
the pictures here to attach them to your e-mail

If your sending large picture files say 6.0mp and up then don't send more than one to 3 per e-mail
otherwise it can chog up your e-mail client for several minutes to hours.

If you want to send many pictures or video files to friends and family members you might consider
Dropbox. This is an online backup and storage program that will allow to share files online.

Method 2 with photo management:

Photo management software can take alot of the manual process of getting photos from your camera and storing them on your hard drive, fixing lighting, fixing red eye, fixing orientation,
tagging, organizing and other things you may want to do with your photos and automating the
process. Some of these have either the ability to create web albums or email pictures directly
from the photo management software. I personally like Picasa from Google

May 02, 2011 | Olympus FE-310 Digital Camera

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Photo,s are too big for sending by e-mail


You can set the resolution on the camera for lower resolution. You may not want to do this if you are planning to print the photos on a printer especially if you want larger prints. The best solution is to download the pictures in the cameras resolution and then reduce the resolution using a graphics program such as photoshop to a web format resolution.
There are shareware programs that can also reduce the resolutiion once loaded onto your PC.

May 17, 2009 | Fuji FinePix S8000fd Digital Camera

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When i email photo it is too large for receiver to open


Hi I am vortash that's very unusual as most emails will take up to a gig on a download now hot mail ., yahoo .. etc so maybe its the format your trying to send that's the problem .. pictures in BMP bitmap are far larger files than say JPEG or JIF files and most mail servers require Jpeg for photo attachments .. and I do know that some cameras actually load pictures to your computer in Bitmap form .. so you need to change them .. easy enough just save them again but choose Jpeg or Jif compliant and the computer will do the rest .. hope this helps Regards Vortash

Jan 20, 2009 | Fuji FinePix F10 Digital Camera

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Savings photos to cd


As advised, I opened the 'Save to cd' part of Windows XP (Home) and followed the instructions. Easy when you know how! Many thanks, Tim

Jun 30, 2008 | Digital Cameras

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Getting lines in photos


go to the canon web site they have an advisory out on this I just got mine back actually they kept my S1 IS and sent me a new S5 IS because "they did not have the part and wanted to expedite my repair"

Here is another site I found when I encountered my problem
http://www.imaging-resource.com/NEWS/1164376280.html

I sent my camera in per Canons instructions, received an e-mail a few days later(1/9/08) confirming that they would repair it a few more days later (1/16/08)I received another e-mail confirming that it had been repaired and shipped. Today (1/17/08) I got it and to my very pleasant surprise the box contained a new S5 IS!!! I will be sending them a very nice THANK YOU for it after I post this.

PS: e-mail accepting repair 1/9/08
1/16/08 e-mail stating it shipped on 1/15/08,
received 1/17/08 via FED EX

Jan 10, 2008 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

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Sending photos as an e-mail attachment


When sending photos as e-mail attachments, the image (file) size should not be too large. Use the included image viewing program called Image Expert to save photos in reduced size. For instructions on installing Image Expert, see "Installing the image viewing program" on page 42 of the Instruction Manual. 1. Launch Image Expert. 2. Choose "Open Image" from the "File" menu. 3. Specify the image you want to reduce, then click "Open". If the camera is connected using the USB cable, it is displayed as a removable disc. images on the camera can be opened directly by specifying the remove-able disc. 4. Click on "Change Size" in the "Image" menu. 5. Input values at "Width" and "Height", then click "OK". If "Keep Aspect Ratio" is checked, the size is changed without changing the image’s vertical:horizontal ratio. 6. The image is displayed at its new size. 7. Click on "Save As" in the "File" menu to save the image with the new size.

Sep 11, 2005 | Toshiba Sora PDR-T10 Digital Camera

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Saving photo files


The building blocks of your image library are the actual file formats in which you save your images. There are two major formats: compressed and uncompressed. • The advantage of uncompressed storage is that you can save a maximum amount of image-forming information for color fidelity and clarity. • Compressed file formats get rid of some information to shrink the file size (thereby increasing a disk's storage capacity). We recommend saving all your work-in-progress images (equivalent to the negatives in film cameras) as TIFF files. This way they will remain at maximum quality, so you can create other versions for printing or e-mailing, and can save them in smaller, compressed files like JPEGs. The advantage is that you'll always be able to recreate an effect or enhancement by starting with the original TIFF file without losing image integrity.

Sep 08, 2005 | HP Photosmart 120 Digital Camera

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