Question about Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

3 Answers

Rapid battery drain in my *ist DS

I had been getting a couple hundred pictures per set of NiMH rechargeables. Every once in a while, though, it seemed like I got only a few pictures. I chalked this up to not charging them completely. Well, yesterday it came to a head. I went on a photo shoot in a nature area with some friends from my local camera club. I just charged the batteries overnight, so I didn't bring a spare set (OK, lesson learned!). After taking 6 (yes, six) shots, the batteries were dead. I took 'em out, rearranged 'em, and put 'em back in. Still dead. Dead dead dead. As in doorknob. Could not take even 1 additional picture. One of my friends had her own set of freshly charged batteries that she graciously let me borrow. Different batteries, different charger. 5 (yes, five) pictures later, they died. 11 photos were the sum total of my expedition yesterday. I brought the Pentax in to the camera store for warranty repair. Several sales folks there said they had the same problem with the Pentax demo camera. They thought it might be common. However, I've only found a couple threads here discussing it, and that was for burst mode. I wasn't using burst mode, since I was photographing static flowers. Anyone else have this problem? Anyone return it for repair? Any difference? Oh, and they said there are no local places that do warranty repair, so it has to get sent back to Pentax meaning a 6- to 8-week wait.

Posted by Anonymous on

3 Answers

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Master:

    An expert who has achieved Level 3.

  • Master
  • 542 Answers
Re: Rapid battery drain in my *ist DS

I think that the charger has just as much to do with it as the batteries. When I first got my *ist D, I regularly got about 400 shots per charge. I bought another charger and the number of shots per charge went down to 100 to 150. I recently purchased the La Crosse charger from Thomas Distributing and I am back up to about 400 shots per charge. By the way this charger is wonderful. It actually provides you with quantitative information about the charging of your batteries with LCDs that are dedicated to each cell instead of a simple LED. If you are serious about NIMH batteries I suggest you give it a look

Posted on Sep 08, 2005

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Master:

    An expert who has achieved Level 3.

  • Master
  • 542 Answers
Re: Rapid battery drain in my *ist DS

I've been using NiMH rechargeables since I bought the DS (Power2000 brand, 2400mah) and getting a consistent 500-700 exposures per charge out of them. They work fine for me in my usual run of shooting week by week, and I like the reusability for that. However, on the strength of John Bean and John McDermott's experience, I decided to use the Lithium disposables for the course of the photo trip I'm on. They're lighter than the NiMH batteries and five sets take up less space than two sets of NiMH plus charger, no charging hassles, etc. Five sets cost me $40. The first set (Everready CRV3) lasted 1300 exposures. I replaced them yesterday with a set of Everready AA Lithium E2s ... I'll let ya know how long they last, how many I consume before June 15...

Posted on Sep 08, 2005

  • Level 3:

    An expert who has achieved level 3 by getting 1000 points

    All-Star:

    An expert that got 10 achievements.

    MVP:

    An expert that got 5 achievements.

    Master:

    An expert who has achieved Level 3.

  • Master
  • 542 Answers
Re: Rapid battery drain in my *ist DS

Have you tried it with lithiums? It may not be a discharge problem so much as a low-battery detect problem. The NiMH are very low voltage even when fully charged compared with a lithium, maybe that's a clue. Either way it looks like a trip to Mr Pentax to get it orted :-( FWIW I use lithium AAs routinely, I tried some NiMH that I had and only got about 250 shots per charg and they failed a bit too abruptly - mid file write! - for my taste. I get 800-1200 shots from a set of Energizer AA lithiums, they give me plenty of warning of impending failure, I can stand the cost and I value the peace of mind that they give :-)

Posted on Sep 08, 2005

Add Your Answer

0 characters

Uploading: 0%

my-video-file.mp4

Complete. Click "Add" to insert your video. Add

×

Loading...
Loading...
3 Points

Related Questions:

1 Answer

After having my Canon PowerShot A1100 IS for a year, the batteries would die after only a few pictures. I was using regular AA batteries in it and not NIMH batteries.


Crazy thing about "regular" AA's I ran into the same thing and just shook ,my head but the regular batteries just don't last in the cameras at all switch to a set of rechargeable and you'll get a lot more pictures per charge. On my little camera I went from getting about 30 pictures to a set of AA's to over 300 with the rechargeable type. I don't know what country you are in but Sony has a set that when you buy them they are already charged AND once used and charged again will hold up to 80% of their power for a year just sitting, basically unheard of for a rechargeable battery

Dec 22, 2010 | Canon PowerShot A1100 IS Digital Camera

3 Answers

Power / batteries


This is a common problem...sometimes you have to turn it on a couple of times.

Mar 17, 2010 | Pentax *ist DL Digital Camera

1 Answer

Camera shuts down


Are you still using alkaline batteries? If so, alkaline batteries just don't have the power for more than a few pictures in a digital camera. Some may also have reached their shelf life at the store, and though brand new and right out of the package may even have problems just powering startup of the camera. Digital cameras that use AA's for the most part should only be used with rechargeable NiMH batteries. If you read the camera's instruction manual concerning batteries, you may see the same recommendation.

Keep in mind rechargeable NiMH batteries will save you money in the long run over alkalines, AND they'll last for at least 100 pictures per charge (and probably many many more). You'll be very pleased with their performance, and may be angry with yourself for not buying them sooner. When at the store, look on the package for a power rating of at least 2500 mah.

May 31, 2009 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

LCD Not on during oicture taking


LCD cameras eat batteries... i bought dollar store batteries for one of my cameras once.... one picture per set of batteries... I recommend you purchase a good set of rechargable batteries and a charger. I actually have two sets ... one in the camera one charging. Now on to the lcd screen... you need to look thru the menu for that camera to see if the setting for the screen is off. On one of my cameras the screen is actually defective... which in some ways is good as it less of a drain on the batteries... incidentally it is a kodak as well.

Robert

Jan 10, 2009 | Kodak EasyShare Z712 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Short battery using NiMH batteries


cudgegong said in another forum:

To resolve the annoying "change the batteries" problem. Goto menu, choose yellow menu, select
file No. reset to ON. Turn camera off and back on.

Voila fixed.

Sep 28, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A85 Digital Camera

3 Answers

Technical problem


I purchased a *ist DS used a couple of weeks ago, and it turns out to have similar problems. This camera seems very fussy about batteries. I am using rechargeable NiMh AAs. After about 30-40 exposures, the camera shows battery depleted. If I turn the camera off, then back on, it will show a charge - sometimes a full charge and will work for another 20 or so exposures. It can keep this up for a couple of days.

I read an explanation in one of the photo blogs (can't remember which) that suggested this was caused by one or two incompletely charged batteries in set of 4. If one is discharged the current from the others supposedly will flow to it, giving fluctuating power readings to the power management curcuit. This sounded plausible enough that I purchased a new charger yesterday which monitors the charge on each battery. Too early to tell whether this solved the problem or not. The other option is to switch to disposable batteries.

Oct 09, 2006 | Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Batteries


Popular alkaline batteries are inexpensive and can be found anywhere, but their power is consumed at a rapid rate. If you're using all of your camera's features, you can deplete a set of alkaline batteries in about 30 minutes! You should consider spending a little more up front for a battery charger and some rechargeable batteries. Many cameras (including many HP Photosmart digital cameras) work with the popular, rechargeable nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) batteries. They are inexpensive and environmentally friendly, and they give you more pictures per charge than any other battery types, except for lithium-ion batteries—another battery of choice for many HP Photosmart cameras.

Sep 08, 2005 | HP Photosmart 945 Digital Camera

3 Answers

Rechargeable batteries NiMH don't last long


i used to have the same problem with my Sanyo 2100mAh. i switched to the Uniross 2300mAh and problem solved. that was using my Ridata 512MB 40X solid state CF. switched to Hitachi 4GB MD (from Muvo2) and now the problem is back. i have learned to live with that though, as it causes no other problem for me except for the faulty battery indication.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax *ist D Digital Camera

1 Answer

What is the difference between the available AA battery chemistries?


AA batteries are available in four basic varieties: Alkaline Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) Nickel-Cadmium (NiCad) Photo Lithium (Li-FeS2) Alkaline and photo lithium are non-rechargeable, while NiMH and NiCad are rechargeable. Each has advantages and disadvantages. Non-Rechargeable vs. Rechargeable: Rechargeable batteries are desirable from an environmental standpoint because they are reusable. Self-discharge refers to the fact that batteries lose energy when unused and even when not in a camera or other device. Rechargeable batteries tend to have relatively high self-discharge rates, approximately 1-2% per day for nickel-based batteries. Non-rechargeable batteries generally have very long shelf lives and extremely slow self-discharge rates. This makes non-rechargeable batteries a better choice for infrequent usage. Non-rechargeable batteries are available fully charged in stores all over the world, which makes them a convenient choice for travelers or customers who have dead rechargeable batteries and no time to recharge. Photo Lithium Batteries (Li-FeS2) (non-rechargeable): Photo lithium batteries will yield the longest battery life of any AA battery, surpassing NiMH by 50-100% and surpassing alkaline by 100-500%, depending on the load. While they are more expensive than alkaline batteries, their additional energy capacity makes the cost the same or less per shot than alkaline batteries. Nickel-Metal Hydride Batteries (NiMH) (rechargeable): NiMH batteries are the lowest cost overall solution for users that take a lot of pictures (more than the equivalent of a roll of film per month) or use a lot of high-power features. The largest disadvantage to NiMH batteries is their fast self-discharge rate of 1-2% per day whether the batteries are in a camera or not. NOTE: NiMH batteries need to be completely charged and discharged a few times when new to achieve their full capacity. Rechargeable batteries will eventually fail. If you have been getting acceptable battery life and then see a decrease in life, either quickly or slowly over time, a worn-out battery may be the cause. Storing or charging the batteries in high temperature conditions will accelerate this potential failure. Alkaline Batteries (non-rechargeable): Although the cheapest and easiest to find, alkaline batteries yield the worst performance of all the chemistries in a digital camera. They lose capacity at high power drains and at low temperatures. Skiers and other winter outdoor enthusiasts may find them unsatisfactory. Alkaline batteries are frequently available in two types: High drain (ultra, titanium, maximum etc.) Regular The high drain versions are a premium product designed to operate better under heavy loads than the standard product. However, there is a trend of major brands to increase the performance of their standard battery to b

Aug 30, 2005 | HP Photosmart 120 Digital Camera

Not finding what you are looking for?
Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera Logo

200 people viewed this question

Ask a Question

Usually answered in minutes!

Top Pentax Digital Cameras Experts

kakima

Level 3 Expert

92728 Answers

Donald DCruz
Donald DCruz

Level 3 Expert

17129 Answers

halotheracer
halotheracer

Level 2 Expert

68 Answers

Are you a Pentax Digital Camera Expert? Answer questions, earn points and help others

Answer questions

Manuals & User Guides

Loading...