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I have a laptop and the mouse does not seem to work we have had it for around 2 months please can you help me

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Remove your mouse (unplugged computer) and see if your mousepad (on your laptop) works. If it works then you have to change your mouse.

Posted on Aug 31, 2008

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Am using Win XP When I turn the pc on with recovery disk inserted the Press Any Key to boot from cd" screen comes up but pressing any key does not get a response then it continues on to the sign in...


OK! Lets troubleshoot this together.

First thing we want to do is verify that your keyboard & mouse and plugged into the correct places and are powered up and able to work.

Turn your computer on and look at your keyboard and tell me if any lights are on to show that it has power and is operational.

Watch the keyboard lights until the computer gets to the login page and tell me if the lights come on and stay on? Or do the lights turn on for a moment and then turn off again?

If you do not see any lights, please clarify if there are NO LIGHTS on your style of keyboard or if there are lights but they are not lighting up.

If your keyboard has lights and they are not lighting up at all, then turn off the computer and unplug the mouse and keyboard and swap them around. Then turn the computer on again and tell me if the lights come on and the mouse and keyboard become operational.

Once we verify this we can continue to the next step of troubleshooting. Please report what you find and I will help you solve this.

Nov 08, 2010 | IBM NetVista PC Desktop

1 Answer

I bought my HP Pavilion dv5 about 3 months ago. On the keypad you have to forcefully push it down if you don't use it within a period of time and the mouse pointer works after that. I was wondering if I...


I have an HP dv5 as well, for about 2 years now. After about a year, I started having problems with the mouse keypad. The left button would work intermittently. I eventually figured out that these mouse buttons aren't designed for heavy use. It's best to use an external mouse. I ended up buying a replacement part off of eBay and installing it (which was a major pain--you have to take apart most of the laptop to get it installed). I'm not sure if the problem you have is related. Was there any impact to the laptop at all that might have loosened something up inside?

Nov 06, 2010 | PC Desktops

3 Answers

The ps2 ports for both keyboard and mouse do not work. i got around that by hooking both up with a usb connector. BUT when the computer is on with no mouse activity for a while, the mouse ''dies.'' Then...


HI,
Go into the BIOS utility and set the BIOS to defaults, hit F10, save the changes and exit the BIOS, the computer will restart, see if that helps.

To get into the BIOS hit the Esc or Del key when the computers just starting up.


Good luck.

Sep 14, 2009 | E-Machines eMachines Desktop PC

1 Answer

How-to move cursor ?


If there is a black square in the middle below the keybord, that is what is called a glidepoint. You just use your finger to glide the mouse arrow around inside of that box. The bars are for the mouse buttons.
If you are like me, I like to hook up a regular mouse via USB and use the regular mouse instead.

I hope that I have provided the correct information that will assist you in the resolution of this issue. If you have any questions, please post back with a comment to this thread.
If I have helped you with your question and/or solved the problem, please take just a moment to rate this post. Thank you!

May 09, 2009 | PC Desktops

1 Answer

Mouse Sensitivity Issue


If your laptop is Vista, this page should have a download for a Vista touchpad driver:

http://consumersupport.lenovo.com/lenovo/drivers/2412/50.html

If it's an XP laptop, try this link:

http://consumersupport.lenovo.com/lenovo/drivers/2412/313.html

If one of them works, let me know which one and rate appropriately. If neither of them do, we'll try something else.

Thanks.

Aug 25, 2008 | Lenovo 3000 N100 0768 - Pentium Dual Core...

2 Answers

I HAVE A LOGITECH CORDLESS MEDIA MOUSE BOUGHT ABOUT THREE MONTHS AGO AND IT WORKED VERY WELL UNTILL A FEW WEEKS AGO WHEN THE VOLUME BUTTON STARTED TO MALFUNCTION IT BEHAVES LIKE IF IT WERE BLOCKED ON THE...


1) Do not ask questions in CAPS. It's bad form and considered rude in some forums.
2) It's a failed mouse. Replace it or call the manufacturer for replacement.

Jul 17, 2008 | PC Desktops

3 Answers

Dyne Mouse Problem


a mouse doesn't need a special driver, try uninstalling it from device manager and refresh.
or plug in to another usb port.

Mar 08, 2008 | PC Desktops

2 Answers

Computer


fb.gif Replacing a Laptop Keyboard and Mouse
Buying Laptops Computer Repair Replacing PC Parts Copyright 2007 by Morris Rosenthal All Rights Reserved
Copyright 2007 by Morris Rosenthal -All Rights Reserved contact info How to replace a Notebook Keyboard and Mouse with USB Adapter When your laptop keyboard fails, you can usually buy a replacement for somewhere between $60 and $120, but putting it in is a real bear, and given the current prcies laptops have fallen to, it's tough to justify as well. When you own the same notebook computer for as long as I have, the pointing device, be it a pad or an intellipoint thingy, is going to fail. Laptop keyboard life is also somewhat limited compared to regular keyboards, hair winding around the works is a big problem, but I'd hate to encorage folks with limited mechanical skills to go prying off their keys because it takes some skill to get them back on. So, most notebooks have a PS/2 port to allow for an external mouse or keyboard, but few have both. You can try a PS/2 splitter if you can find one, but the more elegant solution is a USB to PS/2 adaper, shown at right. usb1.jpg USB Keyboard and Mouse Adapter
usb2.jpg Computer End of USB Cable
The USB to PS/2 adapter comes equipped with a standard USB input, the rectangular shaped connector (left). The other end sports two PS/2 ports, green and purple, green is for mouse, purple is for keyboard. You don't have to use them both at the same time, but for a notebook with a failing keyboard and pointer (Ahem) it's a good solution. Windows has had native support for USB mice and keyboards at least as far back as Windows 98, I wouldn't bet on '95 as all the USB support was sketchy. The point is, as long as you're using WIndows 98 or later, you don't need any special software with the USB to PS/2 adapter. So, what's the big deal about installing a USB adapter that I did a whole page about it? Try it when the laptop CD drive has failed:-) The CD drive on my notebook went south over a year ago and I never got around to replacing it because I figured with a failing keyboard and mouse, I should be looking for a new notebook. The solution is to actually install the USB to PS/2 adapter on another PC with the same version of Windows. Then, install it on the notebook, and every time Windows looks for a driver on the CD that doesn't work, point it to the A: drive instead, go to the other PC and copy the reqired file onto a floppy, and do sneaker net. It may have taken 20 minutes, but it's a once in a lifetime job, so it was worth it.
usb3.jpg Female Mouse and Keyboard Connectors
Don't replace anything without troubleshooting first! Thinking about doing this for a living?
In case you're wondering, if you want to install real software, as in programs that won't fit on a floppy, onto a notebook with a dead CD drive, you can buy an external USB CD for much cheaper than a replacment drive for the notebook. Installing the software from the USB CD can be just as much fun as above, unless they provide the drive on a floppy, you'll have to install the software on another PC with the same OS first and then bring the required files over one at a time as Windows asks for them. You can use a Jump Drive instead of a floppy, though it's the same amount of work. BTW, I know I use laptop and notebook unterchangably, it's habitual, not intentional:-)

Good Luck, Please dont for get to Vote.Thank You.















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Jan 11, 2008 | PC Desktops

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