Question about Pentax Optio 750Z Digital Camera

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750z exposure compensation problem

Just got the camera a week ago.... Everything works nice, although takes sometime practicing with buttons and menus (it is not very intuitive), but you find a lot of well thought features. My old Minolta f100 had more logical, but at the end less efficient menus. The thing I have noticed while taking my first photos in bright light, is when I am shooting with exposure compensation (these flashing red areas are very handy to let you now that you have to go some steps down) well, I do go couple steps down and before fully pressing shutter everything looks Ok on LCD, but resulting photo is still overexposed (I see flashing red in Playback). The only way to fix this is to go yet more steps down, so that it looks like I am going to get too little exposure, but the result is ok. Is it a bug in software, a deffect in camera or what?

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Re: 750z exposure compensation problem

This is normal for the 750z.. a friend of mine has the same problem. If you try to print straight from the camera, everything is too bright. My friend has to manually lower the brighness and raise the contrast on every picture.

Posted on Feb 15, 2006

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Too much brightness when using s6800


I do not know the S6800 model specifically however, nikon cameras all generally work in the same way. Somewhere on your camera, probably a button or in the menus, there is an exposure compensation setting. The symbol Nikon uses for the button is a "+/-" enclosed in a circle (often half black on white/white on black printing). Press the button and you will either see a zero, a positive or negative number or a a scale with zero in the center with positive numbers to the right and negative numbers to the left.
If the exposure compensation is not at zero, set it to zero. Your exposures should now be correct. If it is already at zero, set it to a negative number to reduce exposure and darken the picture and to a positive number to increase exposure and lighten the picture. Let me know if this solved your problem.

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1 Answer

Over exposed photos


Your exposure compensation might not be set correctly. Just behind and to the right of the on/off switch you will see a small button with a "+/-" symbol. That is the exposure compensation switch. When you press it, you will see a number displayed on the LCD. If the number is positive, that is your problem. Positive numbers increase exposure and negative numbers decrease exposure. Set the compensation to 0.0 by turning the rear thumbwheel while depressing the exposure compensation button.

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1 Answer

Overexposure


Hi Andrew - look for a "exposure compensation" control on your camera. It may be buried in a menu; or an easily operated dedicated button on the camera body itself. You didn't include the model camera you have - so I couldn't look it up. Try googling: "exposure compensation model" where model is the model number of your camera.

Good luck!

Nov 28, 2011 | Canon Eos Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Nixon S8100 fairly new camera, nice pics if the subject doesnt move but horrible pictures if object moves. Very blurry.


If everything in the picture is blurry, you are moving the camera when you press the shutter button. If only the subject is blurry and the background is clear the problem is too slow shutter speed. If this is cause by movement of the camera you must learn to SQUEESE the button while being sure you don't move the camera. It just takes a little practice. If this problem caused by a shutter speed that is too slow, it is remedied by increasing the ISO "film" speed. Even though you have no film, the camera has a "speed" setting that relates to that. The higher ISO value increases the camera's sensitivity to light and thus allows for faster shutter speed. Normally the ISO choices are 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600. Try using 400. The ISO setting is in one of your camera menus. 400 is fast enough to solve your problem in all but very fast movement of either the camera or subject. Using ISO above 400 will cause your pictures to look grainy and not as sharp. Use the highest speed only when absolutely necessary. Slower ISO numbers produce the finest grain and thus the sharpest pictures. It a trade off between ISO and shutter speed because the exposure is a combination of the ISO and shutter speed and lens opening. Each one effects the exposure by half or double.

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1 Answer

CAN YOU PLEASE EXPLAIN TO TO ME WHAT IS EV COMPENSATION AND HOW DOES IT WORK


EV compensation is "Exposure Value compensation". The camera contains an exposure meter which determines how much light is on the scene and sets the exposure appropriately. However, this meter does not know WHAT you're taking a picture of, nor does it know what effect you're going for. The best it can do is to assume you're taking a picture of an "average" scene and want it to be of "average" brightness. It does this by assuming the scene is "middle gray," halfway between black and white. Most of the time this works fine, because most scenes are, well, average.
However, this is not always the case. Suppose you're taking a picture of a white dog playing in the snow. Almost everything in the scene is bright white, but the camera doesn't know that. It tries to make the scene middle gray, and the result is that you get a gray dog playing in gray snow.
On the other hand, suppose you're taking a picture of a black cat sleeping on the hood of a black car. Here everything is black, but the camera doesn't know it. It tries to make an average scene, resulting in a gray cat sleeping on a gray car.
EV compensation allows you to override the camera's exposure setting. In the first example, you'd want to add two or three stops (positive EV compensation) to force the camera to render the dog and snow as white instead of gray. In the second example, you'd want to subtract a stop or two (negative EV compensation) to render the cat black instead of gray.
How much EV compensation is correct? Well, that depends on the scene. With a digital camera, you can look at the picture and see whether the dog looks white or the cat looks black. Film photographers take lots of shot, using various levels of EV compensation, so that one of them would come out right.

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1 Answer

When I turn my camera on it automatically flips to show the exposure compensation button. The only way I can get it to go away and take a photo is to push the lock button and then it lets me take a photo....


Why don't you push the exposure compensation button (the one that's half-black/half-white with a plus and minus) make sure the setting is on "0" and push the button again to turn it off.

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1 Answer

When taking photos with the camera set at the shutter priority, all the photos come out black. I have a lens with a f/2.8, but the on the screen on top the camera, the f reading is showing LO. I have...


You mention everything except the shutter speed. When the aperture shows "Lo" it's saying that there isn't enough light at your selected shutters peed to produce a good exposure. That's why you have dark photos. You may need to bump the ISO up higher, or use exposure compensation to make it work well. For a football game, 1/750 is nice, but you can usually make 1/500 work.

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4 Answers

Dark Pictures


try reseting the camera back to default settings, there should be a function for that in the menus or a small reset hole somewhere in the camera.

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I dunno where my manual is, but the only time I use that button is when reviewing pictures in camera. If I want to delete the image currently displayed, I press "function" and "esc" instead of having to navigate all the menus. As for pointer in top window, can you clarify? Do you mean along the left edge of the LCD display? The arrow there shows up when you activate certain features of the camera. Manual white balance mode will bring up "WB" indicator, higher sensitivity the "ISO H", continuous rapid sequence shot mode the "Cnt" indicator. As far as battery usage goes, this camera can be a hog. If you run it with LCD and backlight all the time, you'll run out of battery in no time. I haven't timed it, but maybe two hours. However, if you make judicious use of power, it's lasted me a day of travel snapshots. Always carry a spare set of batteries though. Nice thing is if you run out, easy to find emergency spares at a store. I've been more or less satisfied with this camera. Image quality is good, low light sensitivity pretty good, size not smallest, but manageable, ok zoom. Pretty good all around camera, although current cameras of same new price range are now much better. I've been having some problems with the switch, and don't remove the memory card with the power still on!

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Flash pictures too blue - optio 750z - help?


Try playing with the exposure compensation lever. Turn it down a few notches when you use flash. I do that all the time to prevent over exposure Or you can set the flash compensation in the setup.

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