Question about Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

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Ist DS problems

My body has a few problems. In longer exposures (like when taking firework shots) there are about 6 pixels/spots that 'burn' in and on the image they are bright red and blue(this doesnt matter for type of shooting, its just most noticable in black scenes) I shoot in full manual, and some of my lenses are manual too (no 'A' setting) and sometimes when i go to trip the shutter, it jsut wont go. i press it and nothing happens, i usually turn the camera off and on and it seems to work afterwards 3rd, my battery life isnt near the 500ish that pentax says it should be. i dont do a lot of viewing on the lcd, and i dont use the flash. when i do use a flash, it is in the hot shoe, powered by its own 4 batteries. Sometimes when the camera says batteries are low, i turn it off and on and it sgood for another 10-30 shots. Off and on aagain... etc. its stupid. Anyways my batteries are all NiMH and they dont get mixed up i have a set of energizer 1700mAh, energizer 2300mAh , panasonic 1600mAh, and i also tried some disposable batteries. So far i have taken 3700 shots. my 4th problem was that the camera would try to autofocus sometimes in manual mode and wouldnt take a pic until you set it to AF, let it forcus, and then set it back to MF. This was solved with a firmware upgrade.. but the other problems were not. What suggestions do you have?

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Re: ist DS problems

I guess one of the reasons I'm intent on filters is not only does my A28/2.8 have a very tiny kink in the glass at one edge (it is otherwise brand-new, having been sitting in its box for awhile), I plan to take the camera sailing. Even then, would you be using filters? I guess it's leftover from the days when salesppl scared us all into getting $20 filters to protect three or four figure lenses!

Posted on Sep 08, 2005

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Re: ist DS problems

Lot's of good filters out there. SMC Pentax filters are still available from B&H (among others). I put some Heliopan filters on my new lenses. Things are a lot different than when the MX was sold. Back then, I only remember a manufacturer as offering one filter. These days, each manufacturer has several levals of quality. Sorry to not be more helpful. For me, I was able to find some 49mm Pentax filters at Frank's Highland Park Camera. Got 'em for 10 bucks each. For the balance of the lenses, purchased Heliopan filters.

Posted on Sep 08, 2005

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What settings would you use on the Nikon D3100 camera to photograph fireworks


Hello
Here are some general guidelines for shooting fireworks:-
Get a good position! Try to determine approximately where the fireworks will be bursting. And get a spot with an unobstructed view of that area. You'll probably need to show up early to get a good spot. Figure out the wind direction and get upwind of the fireworks so that your shots aren't obscured by smoke blowing toward you. Find a spot where you can avoid getting a lot of extraneous ambient light in the picture, as this will cause an overexpose.

Set the camera on the tripod. Don't extend the legs or neck of the tripod. Keep everything close to the ground to keep the camera as steady as possible.
Ensure the camera settings are correct. It is best to set these well ahead of time, as it may be difficult to see your camera controls or your checklist in the dusk or dark. But it's wise to double-check now.
Set your focus to infinity. You're generally far enough away from fireworks that you can adjust your lens focus to infinity and leave it there. If you want to get a closeup of a small part of the burst, you may need to adjust the focus as you zoom in. If you want to include buildings or people in the background, you may want to bring these into focus. Avoid the use of auto focus if possible. Most cameras have difficulty adjusting focus in low light conditions.
Use a smaller aperture. Set the aperture in the f5.6 to f16 range. F8 is usually a good bet, but if you're shooting with ISO 200 film you may want to kick it up to f16.
Turn off your flash. The fireworks are bright enough, and your flash wouldn't effectively reach them anyway.
Take off any filters or lens cap before shooting. If your lens has IS (Canon) or VR (Nikon),Turn it off before shooting. If you are shooting with an SLR or DSLR camera, chances are your lens has the IS (image stabilization) or VR (vibration reduction) feature built in. And if you have IS or VR (it is essentially the same thing, but Canon and Nikon just had to label it differently), then chances are you are used to leaving it on close to 100% of the time - which is generally a good idea. IS/VR is meant to sense the vibration (the shaking of you hands, mostly) and compensate for it. When it does not sense any, it... creates it. Turn it off in order to get sharper images. This tip goes not only for shooting fireworks, but is valid any time you shoot off a tripod.
Frame the picture before shooting. Look through your viewfinder during the first few bursts and figure out where the action is. Point your camera at that spot and leave it there. You don't want to be looking through the viewfinder while you're trying to shoot, because you'll likely shake the camera or your timing will be off. If you're trying to get closeups, of course, your framing will need to be more exact and you'll probably have to play with it more. Once again, frame carefully to exclude other light sources that might distract from the fireworks or cause your photos to be overexposed. 5Keep the shutter open to capture the entire burst. Set the exposure to the maximum length. To get the sharpest image it is best that nothing comes in contact with the camera during the exposure. Use the automatic long exposure of 30 seconds or more. If your camera does not have an automatic long exposure the use of a cable release is OK. Use the BULB (B) setting, which will keep the shutter open as long as the button is depressed. A rule of thumb is to open the shutter as soon as you hear or see the rocket shooting into the sky and to leave it open until the burst is dissipating. This will usually take several seconds.
Spice it up. Even good pictures of fireworks can be boring if there's nothing to distinguish them. You can make more interesting photos by including buildings in the background or spectators in the foreground. Choose your shooting location to try to get an unusual and unique perspective on the show if Possible.
Hope it helps, if so do rate the solution

Dec 27, 2010 | Nikon Digital Cameras

2 Answers

Pentax *ist DS digital SLR Autofocus problem


Being an SLR camera, you should try another lens. It may be a servo fault in the lens. If the lens is okay, then it can be anything in the lens sensing, lens control drive circuits, and or lens to camera interface area. This would have to be properly diagnosed and serviced.

Jerry G.

Oct 11, 2008 | Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Extremely long time writing to CF card


IIRC these cameras support a noise reduction feature through a custom function. The camera will take a second exposure with the shutter closed (i.e. against something pure black) to see which pixels in the camera are "hot", and then will use that information to remove that hot pixel noise from the original image. "hot" pixels depend on temperature and exposure length so the camera would need to do this on every shot.

Mar 05, 2008 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Dead Pixels???


It's a hot/stuck pixel. It's not dust. If it's always the same shade of white and on every shot it's stuck. If it's some shade from grey to white and only shows up on longer exposures, it's hot. Can't be fixed. Canon should be able to map it out, but I'm not sure of their warranty policy. Sometimes warranties on sensors specify a maximum number of defects. Very few, if any, warranty a sensor to be perfect, with zero dead, stuck or hot pixels. If you don't specifically look for it in a print, it's unlikely that you (or anyone else) will notice it.

Sep 14, 2005 | Canon EOS-20D Digital Camera with 17-85mm...

1 Answer

Why is my *ist DS eating my SD cards?!


I've used Sandisk Ultra II 512M cards, a PQI 1G and a Transcend 1G card (all high speed rated) in the *istDS. I've done about 1500 exposures now, many RAW, and have done several rounds of upload to my computer. No problems at all. These same cards work flawlessly in a Panasonic FZ10 as well. Either you have had a bit of bad luck, two defective SD cards in a row, or have a *istDS with a stuck or bad memory card controller. Try using the Reset command in the Set Up Menu, see if that helps. BTW, always format SD cards with the camera once before you start using them.

Sep 13, 2005 | Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Taking long exposure pictures


hi ive just tried it using the same settings and it works on my pc,i dont have a card reader, just the lead that came with the camera,i had compact flash with my last camera so a new reader is next on the list.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

3 Answers

Difference between Auto Picture/Program Mode


Auto Picture-selects on of the picture mode such as landscape(mountain), macro(flower), sport/action(running man) mode, etc. P-sets shutter and aperture. You set everything else. happy face- sets shutter, aperture and everything else.

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

3 Answers

Rapid battery drain in my *ist DS


Have you tried it with lithiums? It may not be a discharge problem so much as a low-battery detect problem. The NiMH are very low voltage even when fully charged compared with a lithium, maybe that's a clue. Either way it looks like a trip to Mr Pentax to get it orted :-( FWIW I use lithium AAs routinely, I tried some NiMH that I had and only got about 250 shots per charg and they failed a bit too abruptly - mid file write! - for my taste. I get 800-1200 shots from a set of Energizer AA lithiums, they give me plenty of warning of impending failure, I can stand the cost and I value the peace of mind that they give :-)

Sep 08, 2005 | Pentax *ist DS Digital Camera

1 Answer

What are defect pixels?


Ocassionally images from digital cameras will have "defect" pixels. These pixels may appear in the final photograph as bright white, green or red spots that are out of place when compared to the rest of the image. Sometimes people call these spots "hot" or "dead" pixels. Usually these pixels, and other types of "digital noise" appear in the darker or underexposed parts of images; additionally, images taken at longer exposure times are much more likely to have this issue. Many Nikon cameras have a "noise reduction" or "NR" process that fixes these problem areas. When NR is activated and image exposure times drop below 1/4 of a second the NR automatically processes the images as they are saved. This Noise Reduction feature is sometimes called "Night Portrait" or "Night Landscape" Scene Modes. If these spots are seen on images photographed under normal conditions (bright light with exposure times shorter than 1/4 second) then the camera may need to be sent in to a Nikon Service Center for repair. Notice the green defect pixel near the center of this image.

Aug 30, 2005 | Nikon Coolpix 3200 Digital Camera

1 Answer

What are defect pixels?


Ocassionally images from digital cameras will have "defect" pixels. These pixels may appear in the final photograph as bright white, green or red spots that are out of place when compared to the rest of the image. Sometimes people call these spots "hot" or "dead" pixels. Notice the green defect pixel near the center of this image. Usually these pixels, and other types of "digital noise" appear in the darker or underexposed parts of images; additionally, images taken at longer exposure times are much more likely to have this issue. Many Nikon cameras have a "noise reduction" or "NR" process that fixes these problem areas. When NR is activated and image exposure times drop below 1/4 of a second the NR automatically processes the images as they are saved. This Noise Reduction feature is sometimes called "Night Portrait" or "Night Landscape" Scene Modes. If these spots are seen on images photographed under normal conditions (bright light with exposure times shorter than 1/4 second) then the camera may need to be sent in to a Nikon Service Center for repair.

Aug 29, 2005 | Nikon Coolpix 5700 Digital Camera

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