Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20 Digital Camera

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Double-exposures Anyhow...shooting with a regular film camera I often shot intentional double-exposures to create certain effects. Is this even possible with a digital camera? I would guess the answer is no, but I'm hoping there will be a way I can do this.

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Re: Double-exposures

DMC-FZ10 and an external flash with a manual trigger can do it. Just set a high aperture number, slow shutter speed, take the pictures...change camera direction a little..then as soon as you can, re-trigger the flash manually.

Posted on Sep 07, 2005

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Nixon S8100 fairly new camera, nice pics if the subject doesnt move but horrible pictures if object moves. Very blurry.


If everything in the picture is blurry, you are moving the camera when you press the shutter button. If only the subject is blurry and the background is clear the problem is too slow shutter speed. If this is cause by movement of the camera you must learn to SQUEESE the button while being sure you don't move the camera. It just takes a little practice. If this problem caused by a shutter speed that is too slow, it is remedied by increasing the ISO "film" speed. Even though you have no film, the camera has a "speed" setting that relates to that. The higher ISO value increases the camera's sensitivity to light and thus allows for faster shutter speed. Normally the ISO choices are 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600. Try using 400. The ISO setting is in one of your camera menus. 400 is fast enough to solve your problem in all but very fast movement of either the camera or subject. Using ISO above 400 will cause your pictures to look grainy and not as sharp. Use the highest speed only when absolutely necessary. Slower ISO numbers produce the finest grain and thus the sharpest pictures. It a trade off between ISO and shutter speed because the exposure is a combination of the ISO and shutter speed and lens opening. Each one effects the exposure by half or double.

Apr 16, 2011 | Nikon Digital Cameras

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What settings would you use on the Nikon D3100 camera to photograph fireworks


Hello
Here are some general guidelines for shooting fireworks:-
Get a good position! Try to determine approximately where the fireworks will be bursting. And get a spot with an unobstructed view of that area. You'll probably need to show up early to get a good spot. Figure out the wind direction and get upwind of the fireworks so that your shots aren't obscured by smoke blowing toward you. Find a spot where you can avoid getting a lot of extraneous ambient light in the picture, as this will cause an overexpose.

Set the camera on the tripod. Don't extend the legs or neck of the tripod. Keep everything close to the ground to keep the camera as steady as possible.
Ensure the camera settings are correct. It is best to set these well ahead of time, as it may be difficult to see your camera controls or your checklist in the dusk or dark. But it's wise to double-check now.
Set your focus to infinity. You're generally far enough away from fireworks that you can adjust your lens focus to infinity and leave it there. If you want to get a closeup of a small part of the burst, you may need to adjust the focus as you zoom in. If you want to include buildings or people in the background, you may want to bring these into focus. Avoid the use of auto focus if possible. Most cameras have difficulty adjusting focus in low light conditions.
Use a smaller aperture. Set the aperture in the f5.6 to f16 range. F8 is usually a good bet, but if you're shooting with ISO 200 film you may want to kick it up to f16.
Turn off your flash. The fireworks are bright enough, and your flash wouldn't effectively reach them anyway.
Take off any filters or lens cap before shooting. If your lens has IS (Canon) or VR (Nikon),Turn it off before shooting. If you are shooting with an SLR or DSLR camera, chances are your lens has the IS (image stabilization) or VR (vibration reduction) feature built in. And if you have IS or VR (it is essentially the same thing, but Canon and Nikon just had to label it differently), then chances are you are used to leaving it on close to 100% of the time - which is generally a good idea. IS/VR is meant to sense the vibration (the shaking of you hands, mostly) and compensate for it. When it does not sense any, it... creates it. Turn it off in order to get sharper images. This tip goes not only for shooting fireworks, but is valid any time you shoot off a tripod.
Frame the picture before shooting. Look through your viewfinder during the first few bursts and figure out where the action is. Point your camera at that spot and leave it there. You don't want to be looking through the viewfinder while you're trying to shoot, because you'll likely shake the camera or your timing will be off. If you're trying to get closeups, of course, your framing will need to be more exact and you'll probably have to play with it more. Once again, frame carefully to exclude other light sources that might distract from the fireworks or cause your photos to be overexposed. 5Keep the shutter open to capture the entire burst. Set the exposure to the maximum length. To get the sharpest image it is best that nothing comes in contact with the camera during the exposure. Use the automatic long exposure of 30 seconds or more. If your camera does not have an automatic long exposure the use of a cable release is OK. Use the BULB (B) setting, which will keep the shutter open as long as the button is depressed. A rule of thumb is to open the shutter as soon as you hear or see the rocket shooting into the sky and to leave it open until the burst is dissipating. This will usually take several seconds.
Spice it up. Even good pictures of fireworks can be boring if there's nothing to distinguish them. You can make more interesting photos by including buildings in the background or spectators in the foreground. Choose your shooting location to try to get an unusual and unique perspective on the show if Possible.
Hope it helps, if so do rate the solution

Dec 27, 2010 | Nikon Digital Cameras

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Really Grainy low quality pictures with my new camera.


Try shooting with ISO value of 200 or less; or set to "Auto".

If you're missing the manual, you can get it in English, here. Page 76 briefly discusses ISO settings. This camera can select an ISO as high as 1600. ISO has to do with graininess of film - the higher the number - the more grainy the images. Higher ISOs are selected when light levels are low and no flash is used or is usable (such as when the subject is too distant). Some photographers use higher ISO settings with high shutter speeds to stop fast moving objects (like wheels on a race car). The grainier the film, the quicker it captures light. Fime grained film takes longer to capture light.

Generally, pictures taken outdoors in sunshine look best when ISO is 100 or less. 100 is a good choice for well lit indoor pictures, too; but may be better with an ISO of 200. ISO works like this:

If a picture can be properly exposed with an ISO of 100 in 1/15 sec, it would require only 1/30 sec at ISO 200, or 1/60 sec at ISO 400. When you double the ISO value, the exposure times are halved. What's the big deal about 1/15sec, 1/30 or 1/60 sec you might ask? Easy! the picture will probably be blurry at 1/15 and even 1/30 sec exposure time, due to the camera recording even the slightest movement of your hands. You'll need to supply a tripod or do something else (such as increase the size of the opening of the aperture or f-stop) to get a properly exposed image.

I hope this helped - if it isn't an ISO problem - let me know. Good luck!

Dec 10, 2010 | Canon PowerShot SX30 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

Dose it have to have lithium batteries


Yes it is recommended, because they last longer. If you put in regular batteries in you might get 12 exposures. Lithium's will give you double the exposure.

Dec 20, 2009 | Canon PowerShot A75 Digital Camera

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When on sports setting, my camera shoots slow and blurry when indoors


More than likely, your exposure- specifically your shutter speed settings- are too low. When you have fast action, you must have a higher shutter speed (Higher, meaning that the DURATION of the exposure is less. So, an exposure of 1/250th of a second is more desirable than an exposure of 1/30th of a second when shooting indoor sports. (This difference equates to about 400% more exposure, duration-wise). When shooting sports indoors, a "Fast" lens, meaning that the front of the lens is bigger, which allows more light into the camera at one time. (This normally equates to "F-Stop" settings. So, a 50mm F1.4 lens will be a "faster" lens than a 50mm F2 lens. The lower the F number, the "faster" the lens. This also equates to higher prices...) Another consideration for shooting stop-action sports photography indoors is using higher ISO settings. When you double the ISO number, you cut the amount of light required to make a good exposure in half. So, ISO 200 requires half the light of ISO100, and 400 requires half the light of 200 and so on. Typically, I use a setting of ISO 800 or higher for indoor sports (Which, BTW is my speciality...). The trade-off for using higher ISO settings is that it introduces more noise into the image, which many people find less desirable. I also wrote a few articles for POPULAR PHOTOGRAPHY & IMAGING about shooting sports. The "football" article will more than likely be the most help to you. Basically, ALL sports photography is shot the same way, and if you use these techniques, your work will greatly improve. Here is a link to those, and hope they help!

http://www.popphoto.com/Blogs/Sports-Photography

http://www.popphoto.com/Features/Shooting-Talladega-Superspeedway

http://www.popphoto.com/Features/How-to-Photograph-Football

Jul 10, 2009 | Nikon D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

I seem to be getting double exposure on most films, I brought this camera new in Duty Free New Zealand in 2001 it went well until 2003


Hi

Sounds like the continous shooting option has been enabled.

I would check this first.

Hope this helps

Oct 19, 2008 | Digital Cameras

1 Answer

Help me please


I can answer a few: Auto is for letting the camera 'sense' and automatically choose the settings (focus, shutter speed, so forth). M is for manually setting these (via menu I think). The head is for portrait settings (likely to soften the look slightly), If I recall correctly person in front of sun is actually a night setting ie longer exposure- but I could be wrong; Mountain with cloud is for landscape shooting and Runner for action shots like at a soccer match (faster shutter). I don't recall what the double-dashed whistle shaper or SCN are. Movie mode (if you have a large enough memory card) creates short movies with sound. The double box could be for coding each picture that you want to eventually 'stitch' together. All this is in my (lost) manual and likely downloadable at Canon's website as a digital manual.

TV AV could be when you hook up a TV or VCR.

Aug 22, 2008 | Canon PowerShot A520 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Over-exposure with AF Nikkor 70-300 telephoto


Friends have you tried not using the A-Aperture mode?? Set in on P-for Program or M-for Manual, this should produce the colors you are hoping for. If your photo is still "hot" use the + or - button called the Exposure compensation button on the top of the camera, push that little button and turn the outside main control dial where your right thumb sits 1 third stop at a time, (you have 4 to 5) The + adds light to your photo and the - will make your photos darker play with that and let me know. Barry Brown www.coralreefphotos.com

Jun 26, 2008 | Nikon D70s Digital Camera

1 Answer

Digital slr camera


You'll need to use your camera in manual mode.

If you want the subject sharp, but the background blurred, use a large aperture and high speed exposure. This will reduce the focal length.

Remember that a large apertures are often used for night shots because they allow more light through the lense. A fast exposure will prevent the shot from being over exposed if you are taking it in daylight.

Flash photography is not recommended for the effect you are after.

Mar 24, 2008 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

Sequential shooting modes


There are four sequential modes: Sequential shooting, High-speed Sequential shooting, AF Sequential shooting and Auto Bracketing. Sequential shooting modes can be selected from the CAMERA menu: Sequential shooting: A maximum of 11 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 1.7 fps in HQ mode. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. High-speed Sequential shooting: A maximum of 4 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 3.3 fps. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. AF Sequential shooting: Focus is individually locked for each frame. The AF Sequential shooting speed is slower than for normal sequential shooting. Auto Bracketing: When Auto bracketing is set, exposure is changed automatically for each frame when you start shooting. The exposure differential can be selected in the menus. Focus and white balance are locked at the first frame.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-8080 Wide Zoom Digital...

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