Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20 Digital Camera

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The colour on the EVF and LCD is pretty pink and nearly red

My question is that when setting the white balance to FLASH, no matter the light source is white fluorescent light or incandescent light, the colour on the EVF and LCD is pretty pink and nearly red. Is it the same on your FZ20?

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Yes it is. I believe Panasonic knows that the built in flash casts a very blue tint so they set the flash WB to very red to compensate. Therefore before the flash is triggered as when you watch the LCD. Some threads here even suggested adjust the WB further 2 knots to the red manually (press " up" a few times on the 4-way button to have better skin tone. Try it. The setting stays even when you turn off the camera.

Posted on Sep 07, 2005

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Posted on Jan 02, 2017

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When i take pictures they show with a pink color? i reset the camera to factory settings but still same pink pics advise?


This FE-340 Olympus is a great camera. Lots of features and usually great results
  • Indoor pictures with flash set on auto WB (white balance) should not be a problem
  • Indoor pictures without flash requires setting the WB to match the light source in the room (incandescent, florescent etc) Outdoor pictures WB on auto generally not a problem
For more help Include a photo with the metadata of the photo from the image data file

Dec 02, 2015 | Olympus FE-340 Digital Camera

3 Answers

Why do my in door pictures come out looking very red or oranfe


Unless you tell it otherwise, your camera sets its colour profile based on the colours as seen under natural daylight. If you are using artificial light, the colours will actually be different. Tungsten lighting gives a a yellow/orange colour and fluorescent tends more towards the green. You need to find the White Balance control in your camera's menu and set it for the lighting in your scene. IF you have several differnet types of light, then you might need to work on the image in a photo editing package such as Photoshop or PS Elements.

Search Google for articles on lighting colour casts.

Jul 28, 2014 | Canon Cameras

1 Answer

We have a Canon rebel XT EOS the flash pops up no matter what the


Frustrating I am sure. I had the same problem on my first XTi. I cannot remember what the settings were, but I think I was set for portrait and had flash set as the white balance default source. Therefore the camera always popped up the flash assuming that I wanted or needed fill flash.

Change you white balance to sun/shade/tungston etc as is appropriate, choose a faster ISO speed in lower light levels and try using the P or Tv mode and use a shutter speed that generates a middle range aperature for your particular lens.

Jan 18, 2010 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Colour balance for majority of photo is good but sky or white goes to pink. Colour balance is obviously not the problem. Help?


How about White Balance? Taking a photo outdoors, for example, white your WB is set on "Fluorescent Light" will turn your images bluish. To set WB, see the owners manual.

Jun 07, 2009 | Canon Rebel XT / EOS 350D Digital Camera

1 Answer

Best setting for indoor


There are three possible solutions for you:

1. Just use the Daylight (direct sun) white balance setting. Electronic flash is typically close to the direct sunlight setting for white balance. Advantages: it is simple. Disadvantages: if you are balancing electronic flash with ambient light, you are likely to have an odd mixture of lighting, with the ambient lighting tending toward red (if incandescent) or green (if flourescent).

2. Get a Wratten 85 color correction gel that you can cover your flash's head with, and use the Tungsten white balance setting. This will bring your flash output into line with existing incandescent light sources. Advantages: almost as simple as (1), and allows you to come close to matching a common indoor lighting situation. This will produce more natural-looking environmental shots if you balance the flash and incandescent ambient light contributions to the exposure. Disadvantages: large gel filters get expensive. You may be able to obtain something close to the Wratten 85 color correction filter from a theater supply house more cheaply. Roscolux #3408 is slightly weaker and #3411 is slightly stronger than the Wratten 85. If you have to balance flash with flourescent light sources, try a Roscolux in the cyan series leading to #4360. Some experimentation is likely to be required. The place I looked online offered the Roscolux in 20x24" sheets for about $7 per sheet, a bargain compared to the optical-grade Wratten filters.

3. Set a custom white balance. This is not too difficult, and it will definitely provide the best approximation to your desired white balance that you will obtain in the field. Advantages: this will allow you to reproduce white accurately even with mixed lighting sources. Combine with gel over flash of (2) for the very best approach to balanced flash/incandescent lighting situations. Disadvantages: requires a "white" target (can be a neutral gray photo card, for example) and some additional time before a photo session.

You can obtain some striking effects by purposely mixing color temperature light sources. But day in and day out, getting a balanced shot is a skill that it pays to cultivate.

Feb 03, 2009 | Fuji FinePix S2 Pro Digital Camera

1 Answer

Colour representation on Eos 40d


Have you checked your white balance? Having an improper white balance is one of the most common color problems with digital cameras. 
If true color is what you're after, then you need to tell the camera what true white is, too. Try either shooting a grey card, or using an expodisc. For each lighting situation, you properly expose a shot of the grey card, or a blank frame using the expodisc, and then you set your camera to use that image as the white balance image. Now, your camera will see what you see a whole lot better. Keep in mind that the auto white balance is just a best approximation of what the camera thinks it sees. However, in many situations, there is not only one light source. There are reflected light sources, diffused light sources, and direct light sources all over the place — all of them different color temperatures and intensities. The grey card and expo disc help take these all into account. And while it may seem like a lot of trouble to set the white balance all the time, I think it will be well worth it when you (and everyone) else is amazed at the true colors you are capturing.
Happy shooting!
Jeff

Jun 22, 2008 | Canon EOS 40D Digital Camera

3 Answers

Samsung tv settings


it depends on what your using it for, adjust colour tones to what you think looks natural, contrast between 80-90, keep sharpness below 30. just have a play around till you find what best suits the source material.

Mar 25, 2008 | Samsung LE40R74BDX 40 in. LCD Television

1 Answer

White balance metering


Cameras need a white reference for that measurement, they don't get it from the meter. On your camera (which I think works pretty much like my 10D) you can take a picture of a white card (white reference); the camera would use that frame to set its WB in AUTO mode (AWB). You can also safely guesstimate the K value with a little practice for cases in which a white card is not available or no other white objects are at hand. White Balance measures the light K value which illuminates a scene it doesn't measure the objects in an image. Further, in some cases you may have mixed lighting which makes matters slightly more complex. For example: if you are shooting under tungsten ambient light and want to use flash as a main or fill light you'll have to use a gel on the flash to match the ambient light and set the camera to that K value. This will give uniform light cast (color). However, for creative purposes, it's desirable occasionally to let one of the two light sources "shift". In the example just given, if you set the camera to a K value of 5600-5800 (around a typical flash K value) and use the flash without gels then, the tungsten ambient light would appear as shifted (redish, the typical tungsten colorcast when used with daylight film/wb) while the flash light would be balanced and not shifted. This difference (shift) would give the picture a different feeling.

Sep 14, 2005 | Canon PowerShot EOS D60 Digital Camera

1 Answer

White Balance


What is White Balance? The human eye captures white as white, red as red and blue as blue, regardless of whether you are outside under the sun or inside under incandescent lighting. Although this is something that we take for granted, the human eye actually adapts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. In reality, when light sources vary, colors caught as the reflection of those light sources also vary. For instance, films for cameras that use film are designed to capture the most appropriate coloring outside under the sun. Thus when you take pictures under incandescent or fluorescent lighting without using a flash, the colors in the resulting picture may seem strange. Digital camera and digital camcorders are equipped with a handy feature called "White Balance" that corrects the changes in color under different light sources, just like the human eye. One of the white balance settings, "Auto White Balance" (AWB) automatically adjusts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. White Balance and Coloring The White Balance feature on Canon digital cameras and camcorders is set to "Auto White Balance" at the time of purchase. If you prefer different coloring, if you want to adjust the coloring more in detail, or if you want to change the coloring on purpose, we recommend that you change the white balance setting.

Sep 04, 2005 | Canon Optura 500 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

1 Answer

White Balance


What is White Balance? The human eye captures white as white, red as red and blue as blue, regardless of whether you are outside under the sun or inside under incandescent lighting. Although this is something that we take for granted, the human eye actually adapts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. In reality, when light sources vary, colors caught as the reflection of those light sources also vary. For instance, films for cameras that use film are designed to capture the most appropriate coloring outside under the sun. Thus when you take pictures under incandescent or fluorescent lighting without using a flash, the colors in the resulting picture may seem strange. Digital camera and digital camcorders are equipped with a handy feature called "White Balance" that corrects the changes in color under different light sources, just like the human eye. One of the white balance settings, "Auto White Balance" (AWB) automatically adjusts to correct the changes in color under different light sources. White Balance and Coloring The White Balance feature on Canon digital cameras and camcorders is set to "Auto White Balance" at the time of purchase. If you prefer different coloring, if you want to adjust the coloring more in detail, or if you want to change the coloring on purpose, we recommend that you change the white balance setting.

Sep 04, 2005 | Canon GL2 Mini DV Digital Camcorder

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