Question about Makita Reciprocating Saw 2600 Spm, 8 Amp

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Depth/Length Problem what is the right stroke depth/length for me?

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A longer stroke depth (e.g., 1-1/4") is best for faster, more aggressive cuts, while a shorter stroke length (e.g., 3/4") is needed for plunge cuts

Posted on Aug 27, 2008

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Controlling Depth of Field


A photographed object will only appear sharp in an area a specific distance from the camera. The human eye and brain still accept some areas of the image as acceptably sharp if they lie near the plane of focus and already show a small degree of blur. This zone, which is still in acceptably sharp focus, is called depth of field.

You'd typically want a wide depth of field when shooting landscapes, so as to have everything from the flower in the foreground to the mountains on the horizon in focus. You'd typically want a narrow depth of field for such subjects as portraits and flowers, blurring the background to avoid distractions.

How large this depth of field is depends on the distance to the subject, the aperture, and the focal length of the lens. Whether you're shooting film or digital makes no difference.

If the plane of focus lies further away from the camera, the depth of field is wider than if the camera focuses on an object close by.

Small apertures (large f/numbers) result in a wider depth of field.

Short focal length lenses (wide angle) have a wider depth of field than long focal length lenses (telephoto).

The depth of field is determined by the actual focal length of the lens, not the "35-mm equivalent" often used in the camera specifications. Because most compact cameras have sensors much smaller than SLRs, they have much shorter lenses, giving wider depth of field. This is great for landscapes, not so great for portraits.

To get a narrow depth of field, set the aperture as large as you can (smaller f/numbers), move in close to the subject, and zoom in. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Portrait mode. And yes, the last two items above, moving in close and zooming in, are in opposition, You'll have to decide on the best balance for your picture.

To get a wide depth of field, set the aperture as small as you can (larger f/numbers), move away from the subject, and zoom out. If your camera doesn't give you direct control over the aperture, try using the Landscape mode.

Before going on vacation or shooting your child's wedding, experiment with these factors. Shoot things in your backyard or at a park, trying for both narrow and deep depth of field, then look at the pictures on your computer.

on Jun 23, 2011 | Cameras

4 Answers

My pool is 16feet wide by 32 long 10 feet deep what is the square footage


What you looking to know?

Square feet suggests a flat area, like the floor plan of the pool, which would be 16 x 32 = 512 square feet. Like you'd measure walls for tiles or paper etc.

As you've given 3 dimensions, sounds like your after the cubic capacity/volume of the pool, in which case your looking at cubic feet (same as flat area above, but with the added depth to go from flat 2d, to 3d (2 vs 3 dimensions)), which would be 16 x 32 x 10 = 5,120 cubic feet.

Jun 02, 2015 | Pool & Spa

1 Answer

How many cubic yards are 2106 cubis feet


Imagine or draw a cubic yard. It has a length of 1 yard, a width of 1 yard, and a depth of 1 yard. Now each of these yards can be broken down into 3 feet, since there are 3 feet in a yard. Thus, a cubic yard has a length of 3 feet, a width of 3 feet, and a depth of 3 feet. We have 3 x 3 x 3 or 27 cubic feet in a cubic yard.

Next, take 2106 and divide by 27. The answer is 78 cubic yards.

Good luck.

Paul

Mar 14, 2015 | Office Equipment & Supplies

2 Answers

My pool is 15' X 30 '. Deepest part of pool is 6' in the center. One end of the pool is 3' deep the other end is 4'. What are the gallons required to fill the pool?


not possible to calculate with the information provided. here is a basic formula to get you close.
length x width x average depth x height in feet x 7.5 gallons / cubic ft

Aug 30, 2014 | Pool & Spa

1 Answer

How to isolate the background with finepix s2950


You're looking for what's called a narrow depth of field. The depth of field is controlled by three factors.
The shorter the focal length of the lens the wider the depth of field. To decrease the depth of field, zoom in to a longer focal length (to the telephoto end of the range).
The closer you are to the subject the narrower the depth of field. To decrease the narrow field, move closer to the subject. Also, separate the subject from the background as much as possible.
The wider the aperture the narrower the depth of field. Unfortunately the lens on your camera does not have a particularly wide aperture.
In addition to all that, the sensor on your camera is much smaller than the sensor on a dSLR or most film cameras. This means that the lens on your camera is much shorter than would be used on those larger cameras. From the first point above, a shorter lens gives a wider depth of field. The point is that a compact camera simply cannot narrow the depth of field nearly as much as a larger and more sophisticated camera.

May 01, 2012 | FUJIFILM FinePix S2950 / S2990 Digital...

1 Answer

How much shock n swim for a pool 16 x42


What you appear to be asking is the volume of your Pool in gallons! Here is the formula and resulting answer:

Length X Width X average Depth X 7.5 (for rectangluar) (or 5.9 for a circle or oval)

You need to know 3 values:

The overall length in feet (assuming 42 on your note)
The overall Width in feet (assuming 16 on your note)
The average depth, take a depth measurement at 3-4 locations equally apart along the length from deep to shallow (or vice-versa) (example might 8ft, 6ft, 4ft, 3ft) add these measurements together and then divide the total sum by the number of depth measurements (example 4) this will be the average (example 5.25)

So the resulting formula would read 42 x 16 x 5.25 x 7.5 = 26,460 gallons for the example

So if your pool's average depth is about the same, then your volume is rounded to about 26,500

Your shock product should clearly state how much one bag will treat a given volume (example 10,000 gals) for regular treatment or shocking. Usually shocking involves doubling or even tripling the normal maintenance dosage, but check the product labels and instructions for manufacturer's recommendation.

Aug 04, 2011 | Intex 15' X 42" Easy Set Pool Complete...

1 Answer

Scuba Gauges what do I need them for?


"A diver relies on scuba gauges to know three things: 1.-Depth 2.-Air Consumption 3.-Time Depth and Time are vital for nitrogen and air management. A scuba diver needs to know how deep he has been and for how long in order to judge the necessity and length of decompression stops and to calculate residual nitrogen for repetitive dives. The time of a dive is easily tracked using a scuba diving watch and the depth is tracked using a depth gauge. "

Dec 01, 2008 | Aeris Max Depth Analog 2 Gauge Console

1 Answer

Focus


What is the focal length of your lens?

In order to work with depth-of-field, two things are essentially contributors to fully focused image without depth, 1) it depends on your lens focal length 18-70mm or 70-200mm, 2) your f-stop. 2.8 (large iris) or 30 (small iris).

Simply put, a smaller iris (>15 fstop) increases the DOF, or makes things in front-of and behind the subject more visible/clear. Larger iris (<15 ftop) reduces the DOF, or makes things in front-of and behind the subject less focused/recognizable.

There's quite a lot that goes in to DOF, so check out the link above for the details.

Nov 13, 2007 | Nikon D50 Digital Camera with 18-55mm Lens

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