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How to Install plumbing in the basement?

How do I add plumbing in the basement if the sewer line is higher than the fixtures?

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A sewer ejector pump is the answer. The waster line is run into the sump basin, pumped through a checkvalve into  the sewer line that grades with gravity.  A vent pipe needs to be run also, (you can't pump out without replacing the air, it's like trying to suck air out of a bottle) If you add a high water alarm, which is a good idea. It is run off of a separate electrical breaker (insurance) to let you know if the pump isn't working before it's flood time.  The check valve makes sure, that what you pump out, stays out. Otherwise the pump will keep cycling.

Posted on Aug 27, 2008

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You can buy toilets that are basically like a garburator and chop everything up and pump it into the sewer pipe. a sink and shower can also be dumped into this box that is located behind the toilet i have stuck many in and they work awesome

Posted on Dec 01, 2012

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Smell of rotten eggs in shower drain


This is likely "sewer gas" and can cause headaches, dizziness, etc. if you remain exposed to it for a prolonged period of time. This originates mostly in the drain openings of fixtures that are seldom used - such as sinks and showers of basements, guest rooms, etc.

When these fixtures do not get used regularly, the relatively small amount of water that is designed to always be present in the "trap" portion of the drain pipe eventually evaporates. This trapped water prevents the the gasses in the sewer / septic system from passing through the trap. Without it, these gasses will rise through the pipes connected to the sewer / septic system and exit into your living space via the drain opening in the floor drain, shower, tub, sink and even toilet if left unused long enough.

It is usually resolved very easily by slowly pouring about a 1/2 gallon of water down the drain. The water now isolates the drain opening from the sewer / septic system and effectively stops odors from escaping. If you find that this is happening regularly (often from floor drains in dry basements) you should slowly pour water 1/2 gallon of water into the drain, and then add 2 to 3 ounces of cooking oil. The oil is lighter than water and will sit on top of the water surface. Oil does not evaporate and blocks the water from evaporating through it. Evaporation of the water in the trap will take place from the sewer / septic side of the trap, but it occurs at a much slower rate.

After filling the traps with water or water & oil, just ventilate and you're done!

Apr 03, 2014 | Maax Breeze: One Piece Round Shower...

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Basement plumbing. I want to put in a basement bathroom and my plumbing drain from the house is 4' from the basement wall. I need to put in a sewer basket and venting. any diagrams to follow?


My suggestion is to build up the floor where the tub will be maybe 12" above original floor and u can make a couple steps up to the tub the whole length of tub

Dec 10, 2010 | Home

1 Answer

Do the saniflow toilet need to be plumbed in to mains waste? I have a patient who needs a toilet located outside the house that needs to be trouble free


Hi and welcome to FixYa, I am Kelly.

In short yes it will need plumbed with a smaller drain line to the home waste drain.

The unit uses a fast-rotating blade to reduce waste and toilet paper in the flush water, which is immediately and entirely released under pressure through "small-diameter piping" to the sewer or septic tank. No special maintenance is needed and the pump is sealed for life. This simple and cost-effective alternative to conventional plumbing is ideal for basement renovations and other home-improvement projects. Properly sized, a Saniflo macerating system can handle all the fixtures in a bathroom, including the sink, shower, tub and toilet & endash; even on a septic system. What's more, these fixtures will work up to 12 feet below and as far as 150 feet away from a septic tank or sewer line.


Go to this page and download the manual for the installation instructions:

http://www.saniflo.com/Downloads.aspx

These are all the installation downloads available on that page:

Installation Instructions:

SANIBEST SANIGRIND SANIPLUS SANICOMPACT SANIPACK SANIALARM SANISHOWER SANISWIFT SANIVITE SANICUBIC Classic SANISTAR SANITOP

Thanks for using FixYa,

Kelly

Jun 01, 2010 | Home

1 Answer

For years we have been dealing with sewer gases coming into the house. Sometimes it would get to the point of backup or the toilets would not flush. The city will come in and put the snake out well onto...


I once solved a problem like this -- it was the bathtub drain which had no P-trap on it. This could fit your situation -- when the drain is snaked there is less waste to produce odor. When the line gets sludge in it again, the odor returns.

No p-trap means the odor can come up thru the line with nothing to stop it.

Has anyone checked to see if all fixtures have p-traps? One way to investigate, if you can't see the plumbing, is to run drain water somewhere in the house and see if you can hear the drain water running when you put your ear to each of the plumbing fixture drains.

You would probably have to run the drain water from a fixture which is "in front of" the fixture you are checking so the water would run past it on the way to the main drain.

Apr 29, 2009 | American Standard Cambridge 5' Americast...

1 Answer

Fowl odor (sewer like) when washer is running.


Can you see the washer drain line,or is it inside the wall.
You should never smell sewer, I would find a good plumber,or a handy man that knows plumbing, and have him open the wall (if needed)
and install p-trap where the washer is located, at about floor level.
From what you said I think that someone ran a straight line to the cellar and installed the p-trap down there, also have them check the line to see if the line has been connected to a breather line, if not have him install a breather line right there with a one way breather valve inside the wall. The buildup and mildew around the compartment is due to the way it was made by the MFG of the machine, most 1000.00 front washers have a very poor design with this. All you can do is to remove it and clean it with bleach once a month. If you live in an nice area,but not very rich, the cost to do the drain should be around or under 350.00. I hope you get this squared away with no problems.

Mar 21, 2009 | Kenmore Washing Machines

2 Answers

Sewer Gass after using Bocsh 300 washer


When you have problems with sewer gas smells around a
fixture, there can be a number of causes.
1. Sewer gas coming back up into the home
a. Blocked vent.
b. No vent.
2. Leaking drains that cause rotting below the floor.
3. Moisture that causes mold buildup.
4. No trap on your sink.
5. One roof vent on septic system.
6. Toilet needs to be reset and calked.

Sewer gas can come back up into your home, when the
trap completely empties after a letting the water out
of a fixture, when the trap dries out, or when it is
sucked out by another fixture flushing. When water
goes into a pipe, it first has to push the air ahead
of it, if there is no place for it to go, it comes up
the trap. This causes a buildup of pressure if there
is no vent.

If there is a vent, the pressure is relieved up to the
roof, carrying with it all of the yucky smells. When
the water runs down the drain, the air behind it has
to be replaced, if its not, the pipes will try to ****
it from some drain...typically the shower drain, but
sometimes the floor drain when its close to a washer.
When vacuum draws air in through the trap on the
laundry tub it also takes the water out of the trap,
leaving an opening where the sewer gasses can come
back up from the septic system .

Think about your pipes as if they are a drinking
straw. When you put a straw into a glass of water,
the water fills the straw. But if you put your thumb
over the end of the straw and pull it out of the
water, the water (or liquid) stays in the straw. This
shows you, air has volume. When you remove your thumb
from the end of the straw, the water flows back into
the glass. This is the principal of a vent.

So if you only have the smell when a fixture is
running, the trap is refilling after the fixture and
blocking the sewer gasses from coming into the home,
but your vent is probably not functioning.
In addition, if you have only one vent up through the
roof on a septic system, you can get sewer gas smells
coming up through your home. As the wind blows
across the roof, it pressurizes the plumbing system.
Since the septic tank is full of water, the wind
cannot go into the septic tank. So it bubbles up through the
traps into the house. Installing a vent on an
opposing roof pitch, helps to relieve the pressure buildup,
since the wind then is only hitting one side of the
roof.

Floor drains are succeptable to this type of pressure.

If your drains are partially clogged it can work
similar to a clogged vent. Since there is no place
for the water to go, it forces the air, which is much
lighter up through traps, bringing sewer gas into the
home.

If your fixture is not set right or is wabbling, the
traps or wax ring that seals it underneith may not be tight.
When this happens, if you empty the fixture, sewer gas
will come under the sink into the room.

Each of these senarios will require a different
solution. The key to solving your problem, is having
the right questions to ask when the plumber comes out
to look at it. The previous information should
provide you with a basis for the questions you need.

Make sure before you call a plumber to check
cleanout covers and pipes to see if they have
openings to the sewer. If you have an opening
without a trap, you will get sewer gasses.

In conclusion, if you don't have a vent inside the
wall which equalizes the air pressure inside the
pipes, if you are on a septic system with only
one roof vent, if the vent is clogged off due to
sludge and soap scum, if you don't have a proper trap
on your sink, or if the drain is clogged, sewer gas can escape
into your home.

Thanks for using FixYa - a FixYa rating is appreciated!!

Feb 13, 2009 | Frigidaire ATF6000ES Front Load Washer

2 Answers

Installing a Washer in basement


The top of the drain pipe that the washing machine drains in to should be about 3 feet off the ground. If the sewer pipe is higher than that you can either get a longer hose, or drain it into a sump with a sump pump that pumps it into the sewer pipe. If you don't have a sump, first try the longer hose and make sure it drains to a point higher than the sewer pipe (that would be the easiest) or cut a hole in your floor and put in a sump and sump pump (the most difficult).

Oct 08, 2007 | Washing Machines

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