Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ10 Digital Camera

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'P' mode

I am taking pictures on 'P' mode only I have absolutely no idea about aperture, shutter speed, ISO settings. And really don't know what is the effect of changing these settings. Can anybody help on these settings ? OR Is there any good website available from where i can learn effect of all these settings ? Please suggest.

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Re: 'P' mode

Use the ASM setting and try changing your exposure until you get an image you like. The manual explains how to do this, and if you look back at messages in this forum, you can also pick up excellent tips on settings to use, etc. I'd use a tripod here, too.

Posted on Sep 06, 2005

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2 Answers

I have a Nikon D40 and when it's in M and S mode the shutter stays open for too long and my pictures come out completely white.


What shutter speed(s) are you using? What happens when you use a faster shutter speed? In the S and M modes you are responsible for setting the shutter speed, and you can set it to anything within the camera's range.

Aug 28, 2013 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

1 Answer

Where is apulture,iso,shutter speed options present in camera


This is one of the biggest drawbacks of a point&shoot camera. You're expected to point the camera and shoot the picture without worrying about minor details like aperture and shutter speed.
You can select the ISO by pressing the FUNC/SET button in the shooting mode and then selecting ISO (third item from the top along the left edge of the screen).
You can control the aperture and shutter speed somewhat by changing the scene mode. For example, the portrait mode will try to give you a wide aperture, the landscape mode will try to give you a small aperture, and the sports mode will try to give you a fast shutter speed.
If you want to take your photography above and beyond the point&shoot level then you need a more capable camera.

May 10, 2012 | Canon PowerShot A420 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nixon S8100 fairly new camera, nice pics if the subject doesnt move but horrible pictures if object moves. Very blurry.


If everything in the picture is blurry, you are moving the camera when you press the shutter button. If only the subject is blurry and the background is clear the problem is too slow shutter speed. If this is cause by movement of the camera you must learn to SQUEESE the button while being sure you don't move the camera. It just takes a little practice. If this problem caused by a shutter speed that is too slow, it is remedied by increasing the ISO "film" speed. Even though you have no film, the camera has a "speed" setting that relates to that. The higher ISO value increases the camera's sensitivity to light and thus allows for faster shutter speed. Normally the ISO choices are 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600. Try using 400. The ISO setting is in one of your camera menus. 400 is fast enough to solve your problem in all but very fast movement of either the camera or subject. Using ISO above 400 will cause your pictures to look grainy and not as sharp. Use the highest speed only when absolutely necessary. Slower ISO numbers produce the finest grain and thus the sharpest pictures. It a trade off between ISO and shutter speed because the exposure is a combination of the ISO and shutter speed and lens opening. Each one effects the exposure by half or double.

Apr 16, 2011 | Nikon Digital Cameras

1 Answer

When taking pictures outside the camera over exposes. Could i have pressed a button that would cause this to happen? when taking pictures indoors the camera takes awsome photos still, but when we go...


Sounds like you set either the aperture to a large small number (large aperture) or the shutter speed to a long value. If this is the case, it should be that in AUTO mode, things work fine, but one of C, M, Av or Tv (custom, manual, aperture priority, shutter priority) modes, the aperture or time are set to something that is good for indoors, but outdoors (where the light is brighter) too much light comes in.

It could also be that the ISO ("film" speed) is set too high for bright light. Again, in AUTO mode, the camera takes care of this setting.

Try each of the shooting modes and see which ones work. If Av is the one that is over-exposed, try making the aperture smaller. If Tv, make the shutter time shorter. If M, make both Aperture smaller and shutter time shorter.

Mar 02, 2011 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

I'm having problems with the settings on my Canon EOS 400D. When I take pictures in AV mode I can get quality pictures but in TV or M modes the pictures always come out so dark even when taking them...


You need to understand the relationship and teractivity of aperture, shutter speed and iso. In Av mod, you choose the aperture and the camera makes thw shutter speed agjustment, In Tv mode, you set the shutter speed and the camera makes the aperture adjustment, In manual, you have to set both shutter speed and aperture manually. If the ISO mode is set to AUTO, the camera chooses the sensors sensitivity to light automatically. Change to specific ISO
(200-400 for daylight and 799-1600 for night). Take a picture in AV mode and note what shutter speed the camera chose. Then switch to TC mode choose the same shutter speed and see if camera chose the same aperture(f-stop) you chose in first shot. Change to Manual and choose same f-stop and shutter speed the camera chose for you in the other modes. Compare all three photos. They should be almost if not exactly the same exposure wise.
In Tv mode choose a dlowers shutter speed, In Manual choose a combo of slower shuuter and wider f-stop(smaller number). Read your manual.

Jan 02, 2011 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

M42 adaptor


Quite right too. When the M42 adaptor is fitted there is absolutely no exchange of information between the lens and the body: M42 lenses pre-date all of those later developments. Your camera will also be unable to stop down the lens automatically when taking the picture, most M42 lenses don't even stop down automatically when connected to an M42 body.

You need to do things the old-fashioned way. Your camera needs to be set to meter manually, shutter priority mode may also be used. In manual mode you focus the lens as normal with the aperture ring set to the lowest aperture number (i.e.aperture is wide open).
You then make sure that the lens in in manual mode as well and stop down to whatever you want, if the image remains bright enough then you can adjust the precise focus using the hyperfocal principle if you like which takes advantage of the increased depth of field of a stopped down lens.
In manual mode, you then tell the camera what aperture you have set (read it from the lens barrel) and set the shutter speed using the camera's light meter to guide you. If using shutter priority mode then the camera will choose the shutter speed for you.
Check everything is set as you intend and press the shutter.

It all sounds long winded but is exactly how many of the world's greatest photos were taken and soon becomes second nature. You also learn far more about the relationship between aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings and will be able to talk about reciprocity like you know about it!

Jun 26, 2009 | Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D / Dynax 7D...

3 Answers

Dark wiew


is it set to auto? if not i suggest you check the aperture and shutter speed setting :)

Sep 22, 2008 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

2 Answers

F828 and ISO question


because you are (a) opening the lens aperture to let in the maximum light and (b) making the sensor more sensitive so that it requires less light, so the camera must do what it can to counter your settings - to reduce the light by minimizing the time of the exposure. I presume this is a hypothetical question, as you don't normally want to use ISO this high with the F828 if it can be avoided.

Sep 12, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-F828 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Shutter speed


Rule of thumb I read was f11 and then 1/ISO for shutter speed. This means that if you're using ISO 100, you use 1/100. ISO 80, then 1/80. White balance set to SUN (because moon is reflecting sunlight). Wait! My camera doesn't do f11!!! Mine, the FZ20, can only do f8, which is more open and therefore lets in more light. So you would need to speed up the shutter to compensate. Moronically, I don't know how many full stops there are between 8 and 11, so I cannot tell you how much to compensate for. :) I think the number I worked before was around 1/150 at ISO 100. And use a tripod.

Sep 07, 2005 | Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ20 Digital Camera

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