Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ10 Digital Camera

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'P' mode

I am taking pictures on 'P' mode only I have absolutely no idea about aperture, shutter speed, ISO settings. And really don't know what is the effect of changing these settings. Can anybody help on these settings ? OR Is there any good website available from where i can learn effect of all these settings ? Please suggest.

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Use the ASM setting and try changing your exposure until you get an image you like. The manual explains how to do this, and if you look back at messages in this forum, you can also pick up excellent tips on settings to use, etc. I'd use a tripod here, too.

Posted on Sep 06, 2005

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2 Answers

I have a Nikon D40 and when it's in M and S mode the shutter stays open for too long and my pictures come out completely white.


What shutter speed(s) are you using? What happens when you use a faster shutter speed? In the S and M modes you are responsible for setting the shutter speed, and you can set it to anything within the camera's range.

Aug 28, 2013 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

1 Answer

Where is apulture,iso,shutter speed options present in camera


This is one of the biggest drawbacks of a point&shoot camera. You're expected to point the camera and shoot the picture without worrying about minor details like aperture and shutter speed.
You can select the ISO by pressing the FUNC/SET button in the shooting mode and then selecting ISO (third item from the top along the left edge of the screen).
You can control the aperture and shutter speed somewhat by changing the scene mode. For example, the portrait mode will try to give you a wide aperture, the landscape mode will try to give you a small aperture, and the sports mode will try to give you a fast shutter speed.
If you want to take your photography above and beyond the point&shoot level then you need a more capable camera.

May 10, 2012 | Canon PowerShot A420 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Nixon S8100 fairly new camera, nice pics if the subject doesnt move but horrible pictures if object moves. Very blurry.


If everything in the picture is blurry, you are moving the camera when you press the shutter button. If only the subject is blurry and the background is clear the problem is too slow shutter speed. If this is cause by movement of the camera you must learn to SQUEESE the button while being sure you don't move the camera. It just takes a little practice. If this problem caused by a shutter speed that is too slow, it is remedied by increasing the ISO "film" speed. Even though you have no film, the camera has a "speed" setting that relates to that. The higher ISO value increases the camera's sensitivity to light and thus allows for faster shutter speed. Normally the ISO choices are 100, 200, 400, 800, 1600. Try using 400. The ISO setting is in one of your camera menus. 400 is fast enough to solve your problem in all but very fast movement of either the camera or subject. Using ISO above 400 will cause your pictures to look grainy and not as sharp. Use the highest speed only when absolutely necessary. Slower ISO numbers produce the finest grain and thus the sharpest pictures. It a trade off between ISO and shutter speed because the exposure is a combination of the ISO and shutter speed and lens opening. Each one effects the exposure by half or double.

Apr 16, 2011 | Nikon Cameras

1 Answer

When taking pictures outside the camera over exposes. Could i have pressed a button that would cause this to happen? when taking pictures indoors the camera takes awsome photos still, but when we go...


Sounds like you set either the aperture to a large small number (large aperture) or the shutter speed to a long value. If this is the case, it should be that in AUTO mode, things work fine, but one of C, M, Av or Tv (custom, manual, aperture priority, shutter priority) modes, the aperture or time are set to something that is good for indoors, but outdoors (where the light is brighter) too much light comes in.

It could also be that the ISO ("film" speed) is set too high for bright light. Again, in AUTO mode, the camera takes care of this setting.

Try each of the shooting modes and see which ones work. If Av is the one that is over-exposed, try making the aperture smaller. If Tv, make the shutter time shorter. If M, make both Aperture smaller and shutter time shorter.

Mar 02, 2011 | Canon PowerShot S2 IS Digital Camera

1 Answer

I'm having problems with the settings on my Canon EOS 400D. When I take pictures in AV mode I can get quality pictures but in TV or M modes the pictures always come out so dark even when taking them...


You need to understand the relationship and teractivity of aperture, shutter speed and iso. In Av mod, you choose the aperture and the camera makes thw shutter speed agjustment, In Tv mode, you set the shutter speed and the camera makes the aperture adjustment, In manual, you have to set both shutter speed and aperture manually. If the ISO mode is set to AUTO, the camera chooses the sensors sensitivity to light automatically. Change to specific ISO
(200-400 for daylight and 799-1600 for night). Take a picture in AV mode and note what shutter speed the camera chose. Then switch to TC mode choose the same shutter speed and see if camera chose the same aperture(f-stop) you chose in first shot. Change to Manual and choose same f-stop and shutter speed the camera chose for you in the other modes. Compare all three photos. They should be almost if not exactly the same exposure wise.
In Tv mode choose a dlowers shutter speed, In Manual choose a combo of slower shuuter and wider f-stop(smaller number). Read your manual.

Jan 02, 2011 | Canon EOS 400D / Rebel XTi Digital Camera

1 Answer

M42 adaptor


Quite right too. When the M42 adaptor is fitted there is absolutely no exchange of information between the lens and the body: M42 lenses pre-date all of those later developments. Your camera will also be unable to stop down the lens automatically when taking the picture, most M42 lenses don't even stop down automatically when connected to an M42 body.

You need to do things the old-fashioned way. Your camera needs to be set to meter manually, shutter priority mode may also be used. In manual mode you focus the lens as normal with the aperture ring set to the lowest aperture number (i.e.aperture is wide open).
You then make sure that the lens in in manual mode as well and stop down to whatever you want, if the image remains bright enough then you can adjust the precise focus using the hyperfocal principle if you like which takes advantage of the increased depth of field of a stopped down lens.
In manual mode, you then tell the camera what aperture you have set (read it from the lens barrel) and set the shutter speed using the camera's light meter to guide you. If using shutter priority mode then the camera will choose the shutter speed for you.
Check everything is set as you intend and press the shutter.

It all sounds long winded but is exactly how many of the world's greatest photos were taken and soon becomes second nature. You also learn far more about the relationship between aperture, shutter speed and ISO settings and will be able to talk about reciprocity like you know about it!

Jun 26, 2009 | Konica Minolta Maxxum 7D / Dynax 7D...

1 Answer

How to KNOW the light is right 4 an Olympus OM20 Manual camera?


OM-20 was basically a upgraded OM-10 with the manual adapter built in and a number of other refinements.

The viewfinder has LED's to show the shutter speed recommended by the camera's lightmeter for the ISO and aperture selected. It also has an exposure compensation indicator (the +/- symbol) and an indicator for flash ready which doubles up as a post-exposure flash confirmation. There is also the indicator lamp to show manual mode has been selected. OM-10 lacks the manual mode lamp and the +/- indicator.

Like the OM-10, the OM-20 is primarily an aperture priority automatic camera. In this mode you set the ISO film speed, choose which aperture you wish to use (with the ability to use the lens depth of field preview button) and then the camera selects the correct shutter speed. The +/- exposure compensation control allows the user to tell the camera to modify the recommended shutter speed by up to two stops either way.

In manual mode, there is no manual metering. The light meter behaves exactly as it does in aperture priority mode and the viewfinder shows the recommended shutter speed and not the manually selected one. Correct metering is therefore a case of adjusting the aperture first, and then choosing the correct shutter speed indicated in the viewfinder. If the user then decides to select a different shutter speed, then the aperture ring must be adjusted to maintain the correct exposure. For example the aperture is set to f8 and the camera recommends 1/60th of a second. The user decides that a faster shutter speed is required and chooses 1/250th, but the viewfinder remains showing 1/60th. In order to keep the same exposure value the user must open the aperture by two full stops to f4. The camera's light meter will detect the new aperture setting and providing the light on the object is unchanged the viewfinder shutter speed display should now show 1/250th as well to confirm the correct adjustment. Alternatively, the user can choose the shutter speed first by looking at what has been set on the control ring (or by turning the ring to the end of its travel and then counting the clicks from there as all experienced OM users do) and then turning the aperture ring until the shutter speed shown in the viewfinder matches what's been manually set.

It all sounds clumsy and complex but is done far more quickly than I've taken to type this and becomes second nature.

Aperture priority metering is selected on the camera by choosing AUTO on the mode selecter. In this mode the shutter speed ring has no effect and the viewfinder always displays the automatically selected shutter speed.

May 09, 2009 | Olympus OM-2000 35mm SLR Camera

3 Answers

Dark wiew


is it set to auto? if not i suggest you check the aperture and shutter speed setting :)

Sep 22, 2008 | Nikon D40 Digital Camera with G-II 18-55mm...

2 Answers

FEE MESSAGE


Yes, on this camera you leave the aperture ring at f22 and use the camera's controls to set your f-stop. It won't work is you change the ring on the lens. You gain the control of the aperture in the 'M' and 'A' modes. The 'P' setting is for the camera to pick both speed and aperture for you. 'S' is shutter priority, etc

Jan 25, 2008 | Nikon N65 35mm SLR Camera

2 Answers

F828 and ISO question


because you are (a) opening the lens aperture to let in the maximum light and (b) making the sensor more sensitive so that it requires less light, so the camera must do what it can to counter your settings - to reduce the light by minimizing the time of the exposure. I presume this is a hypothetical question, as you don't normally want to use ISO this high with the F828 if it can be avoided.

Sep 12, 2005 | Sony Cyber-Shot DSC-F828 Digital Camera

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