Question about Olympus Camedia D-520 Zoom Digital Camera

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Exposure and flash problems

I have a simple point and shoot Olympus 520 D Since I acquired the camera I have not been able to come up with "rules " for flash use even though I have read a number of online and print articles. One of main problems is taking small group posing with one person wearing dark clothing and others much lighter. Does any one have suggestions or link to step by step suggestions for flash setting for the 520

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Re: exposure and flash problems

I assume your camera is the Olympus D520. This camera gives you very little control of the flash. The only thing available to you is the ability to change the Exposure compensation. I would experiment with raising the exposure compensation adjustment a few steps. This may or may not help. What you describe is quite common. The flash distance on small cameras is usually only about 10 to 12 feet and past that distance, it quickly falls into blackness. Some cameras have Slow Synchronizing which lets the lens stay open a bit longer past the flash. This adds light to the background. You might check the manual and see if your camera has that feature.

Posted on Sep 06, 2005

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Hold shutter open on a olympus 7010 for night shoots


One of the biggest disadvantages of a point&shoot camera is that they expect you to point and shoot without having to bother with minor details like shutter speeds and apertures. The 7010 is no different, offering no way of controlling the shutter speed directly. The best you can do is to set either the Night Scene or Night Landscape mode.

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Flash card error appears on the screen and stops the camera from shooting


Solution 1 • Unlock focus area selector. • Auto-area AF selected for Custom Setting 2 (AFarea mode): choose another mode. • Press shutter-release button halfway to turn monitor o?¬? or activate exposure meter • Memory card is full, locked, or not inserted. • Flash is charging. • Camera is not in focus. • CPU lens with aperture ring attached without locking aperture at highest f/-number. • Non-CPU lens is attached: rotate camera mode dial to M. • Mode dial rotated to S after shutter speed of bulb selected in mode M: choose new shutter speed • P, S, A, and M modes: lower ?¬? ash. • Digital Vari-Program modes: turn ?¬? ash o?¬? Turn long exposure noise reduction o?¬? Turn long exposure noise reduction o?¬? Press multi selector up or down or rotate sub-command dial to choose photo information displayed Select All for Playback folder. Note that Current will automatically be selected when next photo is taken • Select On for Rotate tall. • Photo was taken with O?¬? selected for Auto image rotation. • Camera orientation was changed while shutter-release button was pressed in continuous shooting mode. • Camera was pointed up or down when photo was taken Use Nikon-approved card. • Card may be damaged. Contact retailer or Nikonauthorized service representative. • Delete unwanted ?¬ les or insert new memory card

Jan 28, 2011 | Olympus EVOLT E-410 Digital Camera

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What is the uses and main parts of a simple camera?


All cameras have a body, memory, lens, shutter release, battery and some sort of control to select exposure type and time (auto, night, sun, shade, flash, etc.).

There are *many* variations of how these components are implemented on cameras - even by the same manufacturer. Some of the more expensive cameras give greater creative control to the user by way of offering adjustable exposure times and aperture openings, interchangeable lenses, and much, much more; instead of a simple "Automatic" or "Program" mode. The newer "point and shoot" digital cameras are getting better more sophisticated, but without extensive controls offered by the dSLR cameras, it will be nearly impossible to duplicate the "Wow" effect achieved by those cameras. Of course, a "point and shoot" camera is much less expensive and easier to learn, carry and use.

If you already have a camera, and want to know more about it - provide the manufacturer's name and model, and I'll see what info I can get you.

Please take a moment to rate this reply if you found it helpful.

Jun 29, 2010 | Digital Cameras

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Flash Setting Causes Delay


Without seeing the image, it's difficult to pinpoint the problem. But, going on the description you've described here, my guess would be that your shutter speed is too low to record any movement sharply, or is recording movement you are making while holding the camera. Some things that you may want to review with the camera to ensure that you're shooting the images correctly:

First, if you can look at the image using a photo editing program, see if you can review the EXIF (also called metadata) file and look at the exposure. Generally, anything under 1/30th of a second will show motion blur introduced from hand-holding the camera. If the shutter speed is below this, you should consider using a higher ISO setting or opening the apperture (this equates to a lower "F" number, so "F4" allows in LESS light than "F2.8") to allow more light into the lens. Remember that doubling the ISO will allow you to make an exposure with HALF the light. The down side to this is that higher ISO settings, particularly in Point and Shoot cameras, introduce higher levels of noise.

Ensure that you are no more than 10 feet from your subject. Most on-camera flash units are much less effective beyond this distance.

If you are photographing sports/action, remember that a shutter speed of 1/250th of a second will eliminate most motion blur.

Also remember that most point and shoot digital cameras are "one chip" cameras and often have multiple tasks to perform while making an image (focus, exposure, flash, recording and writing the file are all performed at the same time...), so it's not uncommon to see delays (also called "shutter lag") in point and shoot cameras (DSLR's have multiple chips, and don't have this issue...). One way to resolve this is to depress the shutter release half way. This keeps the chip "hot" and ready to expose. Doing this with a point and shoot camera greatly increases the responsiveness to the shutter release.

Hope this helps and happy shooting!

Jul 14, 2009 | Sony Cyber-shot DSC-H9 Digital Camera

2 Answers

Photos very grainy. Have quality set to super fine.


What camera?
Is it a pocket camera where the lens in internal? that would explain some of it.
Go into your menu and look up ISO and make sure its not set to anything above 400 if you are worried about digital grain or noise.
for the sharpest image you should have it set to the lowest speed setting.

hope that helps,
Caleb

Jun 26, 2008 | Olympus Evolt E510 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Flash drains Li-Ion rechargeable batteries instantly


Inferior batteries from a dodgy site on E-bay -at a guess Sport out on some regular batteries. Shooting in brief mode I would think takes a larger whack out of the batteries than ordinary shooting I would imagine. What are the pictures of?

Jul 09, 2007 | Olympus Camedia E-20N Digital Camera

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Sequential shooting modes


There are four sequential modes: Sequential shooting, High-speed Sequential shooting, AF Sequential shooting and Auto Bracketing. Sequential shooting modes can be selected from the CAMERA menu: Sequential shooting: A maximum of 11 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 1.7 fps in HQ mode. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. High-speed Sequential shooting: A maximum of 4 frames can be shot sequentially at approximately 3.3 fps. Focus, Brightness (exposure) and White Balance are locked at the first frame. AF Sequential shooting: Focus is individually locked for each frame. The AF Sequential shooting speed is slower than for normal sequential shooting. Auto Bracketing: When Auto bracketing is set, exposure is changed automatically for each frame when you start shooting. The exposure differential can be selected in the menus. Focus and white balance are locked at the first frame.

Sep 04, 2005 | Olympus Camedia C-8080 Wide Zoom Digital...

1 Answer

Blurry pictures


It is possible you were shooting in the NIGHT & PORTRAIT Scene mode. In this mode, the camera sets a slow shutter speed for the background exposure and fires the flash for the subject exposure. Since the shutter speed is slow, your subject should be still and the camera should be on a tripod - otherwise blur can result. Since this mode should only be used when the above conditions can be met, you should select PROGRAM AUTO mode for low light situations where you are taking images within six feet of your subject and the flash is required for proper exposure.

Sep 01, 2005 | Olympus D-630 Zoom Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurry pictures


It is possible you were shooting in the Night Scene mode. In this mode the camera sets a slow shutter speed for the background exposure and fires the flash for the subject exposure. Since the shutter speed is slow, your subject should be still and the camera should be on a tripod otherwise blur can result. Since this mode should only be used when the above conditions can be met, you should select Auto or Program mode for low light situations where you are taking images within six feet of your subject and the flash is required for proper exposure.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia D-435 Digital Camera

1 Answer

Blurry pictures


It is possible you were shooting in the Night Scene mode. In this mode the camera sets a slow shutter speed for the background exposure and fires the flash for the subject exposure. Since the shutter speed is slow, your subject should be still and the camera should be on a tripod otherwise blur can result. Since this mode should only be used when the above conditions can be met, you should select Auto or Program mode for low light situations where you are taking images within six feet of your subject and the flash is required for proper exposure.

Aug 31, 2005 | Olympus Camedia D-425 / C-170 Digital...

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