Question about Panasonic Lumix DMC-FZ10 Digital Camera

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Filter I like to keep a filter on at all times to protect my lens on my new FZ10. I am fairly familiar with the effects of various filters on 35mm cameras but don't know what affects these digitals. I have several UV and Skylight filters around that I can use on my FZ10 with my PD62 adapter. Which works best with digital cams? What do you use?

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Re: Filter

Skylight filters don't generally block UV, they change the colour tint optically, which you can do without danger of image degredation in post-processing, so I woudn't really recommend using a skylight filter for digital cameras. I haven't tried a UV filter on my fz10, only my circular polarizer. From what I've heard however, a uv filter may act as lens protection (or use the lens hood), and might in some circumstances reduce haze (rarely), and there are unconfirmed rumours of possibly reducing purple fringing. If anyone could ever confirm this, I might consider one. Otherwise, UV filters also seem peripheral for digital photography. Probably the most important optical filter you can use is a polarizer. This can cut a lot of excess scattered/polarized light and reduce excess contrast, increase sky colour saturation, etc. It's effects are extremely difficult or impossible to get in editing.

Posted on Sep 06, 2005

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Will the Quantaray 49mm to 55mm step up ring work on a Sony a100 DSLR camera


The step-up ring will on any lens with a 49mm filter thread, regardless of the manufacturer. The easiest way to find out whether it works with any given lens is to see whether the ring fits onto the front of the lens (you could also read the filter size written on the lens itself).
If it doesn't fit, purchase the appropriate step-up ring. That will be much cheaper than buying a whole new set of filters.
If the new lens(es) have a 55mm filter thread then you don't need the step-up ring at all. The filters will mount directly onto the lens.

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I am a sigma lens and filter user for my Nikon D60. I haven't used filters before and have acquired a 72 mm DG Filter. I would like to know how to use it properly, Any suggestions would be gratefully...


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If it's a DG UV (ultraviolet) filter, it cuts reduces the ultraviolet light reaching the lens. UV light scattered from particles in the air is what produces much of the haze that can obscure distant objects like mountains. Other than that, it has little visible effect. Some photographers like to keep an UV filter on their lenses at all times, on the premise that it's cheaper to replace the filter instead of the lens should it bash into something.

If it's a DG Circular Polarizer filter, that's something completely different. A polarizer cuts light waves bouncing in a particular orientation. You get this kind of light in reflections from glass and water, for example. Try looking out a window through the filter. By turning the filter (it has a rotating ring on it), you should be able to accentuate or reduce reflections and glare. It can also darken the sky, reduce reflections from leaves, and has other effects. The best way to explore its uses is to go out on a relatively sunny day and look at things through it. Try taking pictures with and without the filter and compare the results.

Since the D60 meters through the lens, you don't have to do anything to compensate for either filter. Just put it on and take the picture.

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Small scratch on front lens causing shadow on some photos, in particular on clear blue sky when a small area in the photo appears slightly deeper blue than the rest.


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1. Get the front lens element replaced by Panasonic. This will be fairly expensive. Afterwards, buy and fit a skylight filter to protect the lens.

2. Buy a skylight filter to protect the front of the lens from further damage and use photo processing software to retouch the affected images. This won't necessarily cost much, but will be a real pain to have to do all the time.

Whatever you do, do not attempt to polish out the scratch as this will destroy the lens coatings and will also reshape the lens slightly ruining it's optical qualities.

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1 Answer

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